19th Expeditionary Sustainment Command Soldiers team up with the 2nd Infantry Division and 138th Movement Control Team to welcome and in-process rotational forces for a nine-month tour once they arrive to the Korean Peninsula.The 19th ESC detachment's mission is to register incoming Soldiers from 1st Cavalry Division at Fort Hood, Texas, or any other rotational forces arriving into the country, into the Defense Biometrics Identification Detection System.As DoD's largest physical access control system, DBIDS uses fingerprints and, in some cases, hand geometry to accurately identify personnel entering military installations. In addition to validating identity credentials, DBIDS also verifies authorizations and assigns access privileges based on identity, affiliation and the current threat level. DBIDS identifies individuals who are wanted, barred from the installation or have other law enforcement alerts."The first group's flights started arriving in January," said 2nd Lt. Krystal Onyema, detachment officer, Human Resources Operations Branch, 19th ESC. "When we first started we had to figure out the best way to get these Soldiers through, now what use to be a six-hour process takes three."On average, Onyema and her team receive 300 Soldiers per flight and close to two flights per week."Once in country, the Soldiers pass through customs and are properly and expeditiously immigrated into Korea. Then they are bussed to their final destination at Camp Casey," explained Sgt. Angelique Alexander, movement sergeant, 138th MCT.The 138th Movement Control Team plans, coordinates, and provides transportation support and in-transit visibility in order to sustain the western portion of the Korean peninsula.The mission is slated to continue well into the spring and the Soldiers of 19th ESC are more than ready to help with the proper intake of additional troops in the Republic of Korea. -30-