KABUL PROVINCE, Afghanistan -- Spc. Mohamed Sullaiman joined the U.S. Army from Freetown, Sierra Leone, in 2015. He cites that he was, "inspired as an old man," but Sullaiman chose to serve not just for himself, he also knew it could give his family a better life.

"I am here working for my family," said Sullaiman, who deployed to Afghanistan with the Rock Battalion earlier this spring to fight for the country he now calls his own.

Three years ago, Sullaiman graduated from basic training with more than just a rank, he earned the right to become a U.S. citizen. Since then, he has excelled as a Soldier and a leader.

"Spc. Sullaiman is a fit, inspired, disciplined train and truly inspirational Soldier," said 1st Lt. Gerald Prater, Sullaiman's platoon leader, "He is an outstanding contributor to the organization."

A large part of his motivation to be a standout Soldier is the hope to one day bring his whole family to the United States. While Sullaiman has served on active duty for the last three years, his wife and two children still live in Freetown. His wife is raising their two children since Sullaiman joined the Army in 2015.

Sullaiman hopes the opportunities available to Americans will open new doors for his wife and children -- opportunities to escape poverty and tribal rivalry and exchange them for security and freedom.

Having been away from his family for three years, most recently in Afghanistan, Sullaiman understands the importance of constant communication, "I try hard to talk to them every night so they know that everything is okay. That I'm alright." He also contacts the State Department regularly to keep in step with the process for his family's permanent resident visa.

Sullaiman has kept his spirits high despite the separation, "I have a special prayer every night at midnight for an hour to ask help from Allah to guide me in the right way. He's helping me not lose faith. It's just a matter of time. I'm still going to keep praying until it finally happens."

A devout Muslim, Sullaiman fasted during Ramadan despite patrolling daily in the July heat. "It wasn't really easy. There were a lot of challenges but I overcame them."

His determination is evident whether he's serving overseas or in the United States. While it's easy to save money for his family while deployed, Sullaiman, who turned 36 in June, lives in the barracks and stays within his paycheck so he can send money to his family every month. He doesn't own a car and visits his family once a year, "Depending on how much money I save," he says.

Sullaiman exudes optimism, and plans on taking three weeks off after deployment to visit his family. His goal, with full support from his leadership, is to return with his family after his much deserved leave. When asked about what it will be like when his family joins him in the United States, "I'll be one of the happiest men. I will say thanks to Allah for everything."

Sullaiman continues to work alongside his chain of command to bring his family to the United States.