• Sgt. Jennifer E. Wynn, an ammunition stock control and accounting specialist and a native of Crete, Neb., takes a break from her job to spend some time with Maj. Eden, a combat stress control soldier, who works with the Bagram Warrior Restoration Center and travels from base to base, unit to unit around Afghanistan spreading her unconditional love to help raise spirits and reduce tensions. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Mary Rose Mittlesteadt, Task Force Lifeliner)

    A dog gone good time

    Sgt. Jennifer E. Wynn, an ammunition stock control and accounting specialist and a native of Crete, Neb., takes a break from her job to spend some time with Maj. Eden, a combat stress control soldier, who works with the Bagram Warrior Restoration...

  • Sgt. Matthew Webber, a human resource specialist and a native of Sacramento, Calif., takes a break from his job to spend some time with Maj. Eden, a combat stress control soldier, who works with the Bagram Warrior Restoration Center and travels from base to base, unit to unit around Afghanistan spreading her unconditional love to help raise spirits and reduce tensions. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Mary Rose Mittlesteadt, Task Force Lifeliner)

    A dog gone good time

    Sgt. Matthew Webber, a human resource specialist and a native of Sacramento, Calif., takes a break from his job to spend some time with Maj. Eden, a combat stress control soldier, who works with the Bagram Warrior Restoration Center and travels from...

  • Soldiers with Task Force Lifeliner break away from work to spend some time with Maj. Eden, a combat stress control soldier, who works with the Bagram Warrior Restoration Center and travels from base to base, unit to unit around Afghanistan spreading her unconditional love to help raise spirits and reduce tensions. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Mary Rose Mittlesteadt, Task Force Lifeliner)

    A dog gone good time

    Soldiers with Task Force Lifeliner break away from work to spend some time with Maj. Eden, a combat stress control soldier, who works with the Bagram Warrior Restoration Center and travels from base to base, unit to unit around Afghanistan spreading...

  • Capt. Jodie Grimm, Task Force Lifeliner's Brigade judge advocate and a native of North Potomac, Md., takes a break from his job to spend some time with Maj. Eden, a combat stress control soldier, who works with the Bagram Warrior Restoration Center and travels from base to base, unit to unit around Afghanistan spreading her unconditional love to help raise spirits and reduce tensions. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Mary Rose Mittlesteadt, Task Force Lifeliner)

    A dog gone good time

    Capt. Jodie Grimm, Task Force Lifeliner's Brigade judge advocate and a native of North Potomac, Md., takes a break from his job to spend some time with Maj. Eden, a combat stress control soldier, who works with the Bagram Warrior Restoration Center and...

  • Spc. LaCedric Cobbs (left), a native of Shreveport, La., Sgt. Matthew Webber (center), a native of Sacramento, Calif., and Spc. Ezekiah Jackson, a native of Chicago, Ill., all human resource specialists for Task Force Lifeliner, take a break from their job to spend some time with Maj. Eden, a combat stress control soldier, who works with the Bagram Warrior Restoration Center and travels from base to base, unit to unit around Afghanistan spreading her unconditional love to help raise spirits and reduce tensions. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Mary Rose Mittlesteadt, Task Force Lifeliner)

    A dog gone good time

    Spc. LaCedric Cobbs (left), a native of Shreveport, La., Sgt. Matthew Webber (center), a native of Sacramento, Calif., and Spc. Ezekiah Jackson, a native of Chicago, Ill., all human resource specialists for Task Force Lifeliner, take a break from their...

  • Sgt. Nicole Linn, Task Force Lifeliner's behavioral health specialist and a native of Baumholder, Germany, enjoys some time with Maj. Eden, a combat stress control soldier, who works with the Bagram Warrior Restoration Center and travels from base to base, unit to unit around Afghanistan spreading her unconditional love to help raise spirits and reduce tensions. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Mary Rose Mittlesteadt, Task Force Lifeliner)

    A dog gone good time

    Sgt. Nicole Linn, Task Force Lifeliner's behavioral health specialist and a native of Baumholder, Germany, enjoys some time with Maj. Eden, a combat stress control soldier, who works with the Bagram Warrior Restoration Center and travels from base to...

BAGRAM AIR FIELD, Afghanistan - This soldier walked in with her head held high, standing on all four legs ready for her mission. The task at hand - to give a paw and warm woof to other soldiers deployed in a high-stress combat area.

The four-legged combat stress control soldier, named Maj. Eden, works with the Bagram Warrior Restoration Center and travels from base to base, unit to unit around Afghanistan spreading her unconditional love to help raise spirits and reduce tensions. During her travels, she made a special stop at the 101st Special Troops Battalion, Task Force Lifeliner headquarters on Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan.

"There is only one of her kind [combat stress control dog] in theater; she is a therapy dog for soldiers to love on, let loose and relax - to help remind soldiers of home," said Sgt. Nicole Linn, a behavioral health specialist with Task Force Lifeliner.

The Lifeliners are known across the U.S. Army for being the logistical lifeline for service members across Afghanistan, but for a day Maj. Eden reached out to provide a lifeline for those who work tirelessly taking care of others.

"We brought her in today and to provide Lifeliners an outlet, it is a morale booster for everybody," said Linn, a native of Baumholder, Germany.

Maj. Eden made her way through each work area to introduce herself. Each Lifeliner soldier then had the opportunity to head outside and play ball with Maj. Eden and give her some much appreciated attention.

"Everybody really enjoyed playing with her. There were smiles all around," added Linn.

For Capt. Carol Jordan, the 101st Special Troops Battalion human resource officer, the visit from Maj. Eden brought back fond memories of who she has waiting back home.

"I have two doggies, Sir Charles and Molly," said Jordan, a native of Charleston, S.C.

Jordan didn't become a pet owner until about two years ago when she found the need for companionship. She realized how she had become accustomed to having consistent interaction with someone around at all times during her previous deployment.

"When my pets entered into my life it was truly life changing. I love them and they love me back and it is an unconditional love," she smiled. "They are a part of my family. It was comforting to see Maj. Eden and to find comfort in the memories of my own pets."

As resiliency stays a top priority for the Army, Maj. Eden will continue to travel around Afghanistan to give unconditional love and provide a dog gone good time to the soldiers she meets.

Page last updated Wed November 20th, 2013 at 10:35