Schofield Barracks, Hawaii--local television crews set up for an interview with Keith Yamanaka, the Chief of the Energy Branch under the Directorate of Public Works, U.S. Army Garrison Hawaii. Local journalists took the opportunity to spotlight the Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) Schofield Generating Station (SGS) to educate local audience about the resilient and sustainable asset located in the Kunia plain area of Schofield Barracks. The HECO SGS generates 40 megawatts using bio-diesel fuel (cooking oil) and has the capability to power all of Schofield Barracks, Wheeler Army Airfield and and Kunia Field Station. This multi-faceted energy asset can also jump-start other HECO power plants during outages.
Schofield Barracks, Hawaii--local television crews set up for an interview with Keith Yamanaka, the Chief of the Energy Branch under the Directorate of Public Works, U.S. Army Garrison Hawaii. Local journalists took the opportunity to spotlight the Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) Schofield Generating Station (SGS) to educate local audience about the resilient and sustainable asset located in the Kunia plain area of Schofield Barracks. The HECO SGS generates 40 megawatts using bio-diesel fuel (cooking oil) and has the capability to power all of Schofield Barracks, Wheeler Army Airfield and and Kunia Field Station. This multi-faceted energy asset can also jump-start other HECO power plants during outages. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL

WHEELER ARMY AIRFIELD, Hawai’i — Amidst a critical need for stable electricity supply on Oahu, the U.S. Army Garrison Hawaii’s Schofield Generating Station (SGS) has risen as a key player in supporting Hawaiian Electric Company's (HECO) infrastructure. Operating five out of its six generating units on January 8, for the duration of the day. The SGS has been providing a substantial 40 megawatts (MW) of power to the island's grid, for over 8 hours with the sixth unit currently undergoing scheduled maintenance.

The SGS, a pivotal asset in the island's power network, extends beyond just meeting immediate power needs. It plays a crucial role in assisting recovery from island-wide blackouts by kick-starting other power plants. Moreover, in the event of an extended island-wide power outage, it is equipped to provide Wheeler Army Airfield (WAAF), Schofield Barracks (SB), and Field Station Kunia with dedicated power for seven days using onsite fuel, and up to 30 days with on-island fuel.

Schofield Generating Station 1) Assist recovery from an island wide blackout by kick starting other power plants.  
2)  Provide WAAF, SB and Field Station Kunia dedicated power for 7 days with
onsite fuel and up to 30 days with on island fuel in the event of extended
island wide power outage.
3) Allows more un-firm renewable resources to be used on the grid by
preserving power quality when the sun and wind fluctuate
Schofield Generating Station 1) Assist recovery from an island wide blackout by kick starting other power plants.
2) Provide WAAF, SB and Field Station Kunia dedicated power for 7 days with
onsite fuel and up to 30 days with on island fuel in the event of extended
island wide power outage.
3) Allows more un-firm renewable resources to be used on the grid by
preserving power quality when the sun and wind fluctuate
(Photo Credit: U.S. Army)
VIEW ORIGINAL

This facility, developed through a collaborative effort between the Army Office of Energy Initiatives (OEI), U.S. Army Garrison Hawai’i and HECO, is not just a testament to military and civilian cooperation but also a key player in enhancing renewable energy usage. The SGS allows for a greater integration of un-firm renewable resources into the grid, maintaining power quality even when solar and wind sources fluctuate, as evidenced by today's extreme conditions.

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ASCIIScreenshot (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL

HECO's 50 MW Schofield Generating Station, situated on an eight-acre land leased for 35 years by the Army, stands out for its strategic location above the tsunami strike zone, providing an added layer of resiliency against natural disasters. Its fast quick start reciprocating internal combustion engines, operating on diesel or biodiesel, not only cater to Oahu's renewable variability but also align with federal renewable goals, with an annual requirement of 3 million gallons of biodiesel.

In May 2021, a black start test of the SGS Microgrid highlighted its capability to independently restore and sustain power across three military installations for 33 hours using 100% on-site renewable energy, marking a significant milestone in disaster preparedness and grid resilience.

The success of the Schofield Generating Station, now a beacon of innovation and resilience, opens up avenues for similar models to be replicated at other Department of Defense installations, setting a standard for military and civilian collaboration in energy management and sustainability.