Graduates of Cavalry Riding School earn spurs
1 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The three newest members of B Troop, 4th U.S. Cavalry Regiment (Memorial), received their spurs and took their first charge across Brown Parade Field during the Cavalry Riding School graduation ceremony May 7 at Fort Huachuca, Arizona. The new troopers are Army Spc. Katie Storckman, animal care specialist; Navy Reserve Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Lee Lovorn, currently working as a civilian at the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC); and Marine Capt. John E. Walton, test support branch chief, JITC. (Photo Credit: Karen Stevens Sampson) VIEW ORIGINAL
Graduates of Cavalry Riding School earn spurs
2 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The three newest members of B Troop, 4th U.S. Cavalry Regiment (Memorial), received their spurs and took their first charge across Brown Parade Field during the Cavalry Riding School graduation ceremony May 7 at Fort Huachuca, Arizona. The new troopers are Army Spc. Katie Storckman, animal care specialist; Navy Reserve Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Lee Lovorn, currently working as a civilian at the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC); and Marine Capt. John E. Walton, test support branch chief, JITC. (Photo Credit: Karen Stevens Sampson) VIEW ORIGINAL
Graduates of Cavalry Riding School earn spurs
3 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The three newest members of B Troop, 4th U.S. Cavalry Regiment (Memorial), received their spurs and took their first charge across Brown Parade Field during the Cavalry Riding School graduation ceremony May 7 at Fort Huachuca, Arizona. The new troopers are Army Spc. Katie Storckman, animal care specialist; Navy Reserve Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Lee Lovorn, currently working as a civilian at the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC); and Marine Capt. John E. Walton, test support branch chief, JITC. (Photo Credit: Karen Stevens Sampson) VIEW ORIGINAL
Graduates of Cavalry Riding School earn spurs
4 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The three newest members of B Troop, 4th U.S. Cavalry Regiment (Memorial), received their spurs and took their first charge across Brown Parade Field during the Cavalry Riding School graduation ceremony May 7 at Fort Huachuca, Arizona. The new troopers are Army Spc. Katie Storckman, animal care specialist; Navy Reserve Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Lee Lovorn, currently working as a civilian at the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC); and Marine Capt. John E. Walton, test support branch chief, JITC. (Photo Credit: Karen Stevens Sampson) VIEW ORIGINAL
Graduates of Cavalry Riding School earn spurs
5 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The three newest members of B Troop, 4th U.S. Cavalry Regiment (Memorial), received their spurs and took their first charge across Brown Parade Field during the Cavalry Riding School graduation ceremony May 7 at Fort Huachuca, Arizona. The new troopers are Army Spc. Katie Storckman, animal care specialist; Navy Reserve Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Lee Lovorn, currently working as a civilian at the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC); and Marine Capt. John E. Walton, test support branch chief, JITC. (Photo Credit: Karen Stevens Sampson) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT HUACHUCA, Ariz. – The three newest members of B Troop, 4th U.S. Cavalry Regiment (Memorial), received their spurs and took their first charge across Brown Parade Field during the Cavalry Riding School graduation ceremony May 7.

The new troopers are Army Spc. Katie Storckman, animal care specialist; Navy Reserve Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Lee Lovorn, currently working as a civilian at the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC); and Marine Capt. John E. Walton, test support branch chief, JITC.

"Today's graduates completed four months of the B Troop Cavalry Riding School," said Col. Jarrod Moreland, garrison commander. "They are taught everything they need to know about taking care of their new equine battle buddies and how to skillfully handle a pistol and saber while mounted."

Moreland commended the graduates for their perseverance, allegiance and success.

"It takes passion and commitment to represent our southwestern military heritage by becoming a member of B Troop."

In addition to committing to the training to become a member of the unit, our troopers spend additional time caring for their mounts and a large number of weekends and holidays representing Fort Huachuca all over the community in southern Arizona.

"I love history," Lovorn said. "Riding for B Troop is an expression of regional and national history and heritage."

Lovorn said he was raised globally by military parents and now claims southern Arizona as his home.

As a teen starting high school here, Lovorn remembers his first time seeing the B Troop cavalry ride at a Fourth of July parade during his father's command.

"I saw them ride; I immediately said, "YES! I want to do that," he reminisces. "I am now living that dream, and it is awesome!"

Lovorn's mount is a chestnut horse named Charlie.

Although not an experienced rider before Cavalry Riding School, Storckman is familiar with the B Troop horses while providing them care assisting at the veterinary care center.

"The riding school is more of a unique experience than I think I could get just going trail riding elsewhere," Storckman said.

"In this riding school, you obtain history, understand maneuvers, and what cavalry riding was like back in the day."

Storckman's B Troop mount is Cochise, a large bay gelding who boasts a spirited personality.

"This is my first experience riding," Walton said.

Walton said the whole process of caring for a horse and riding is therapeutic.

"Riding, for me personally, is a great escape from routine and the daily craziness of my occupation," Walton said.

Walton's mount is a mahogany bay horse named Kidd.

Organized in 1973 B Troop is a U.S. Army mounted ceremonial unit whose mission is to promote the heritage and traditions of the U.S. Army in the Southwest during the period of the Indian Wars and support recruiting, community relations, and official/nonofficial ceremonial functions. Through appearances at social, cultural, and other activities, B Troop advances the interests of the U.S. Army, military horsemanship of the 1880s, and the history of Fort Huachuca.

Troopers wear authentic 1886 cavalry uniforms and are armed with the cavalry weapons of that era and the horses are saddled and bridled with equally authentic equipment.

The unit is officially established by regulation and funded by the Army, but relies solely on volunteers to fill its ranks. Troopers volunteer from active duty, reserve and retired military personnel, Department of Defense civilians employed at Fort Huachuca, and military family members 18 years of age.

A Ladies Auxiliary supports B Troop, primarily by participating in parades riding sidesaddle and wearing period-authentic clothing, and often assists with horse care and training.

An artillery section, known as K Battery, also supports B Troop. These members do not ride but operate the Troop's 1840 mountain howitzer at ceremonies and public events.

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Fort Huachuca is home to the U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence, the U.S. Army Network Enterprise Technology Command (NETCOM)/9th Army Signal Command, and more than 48 supported tenants representing a diverse, multiservice population. Our unique environment encompasses 964 square miles of restricted airspace and 2,500 square miles of protected electronic ranges, critical components to the national defense mission.

Located in Cochise County, in southeast Arizona, about 15 miles north of the border with Mexico, Fort Huachuca is an Army installation with rich frontier history. Established in 1877, the Fort was declared a national landmark in 1976.

We are the Army's Home. Learn more at https://home.army.mil/huachuca