Specialists Cody Stutz and Manuel Heredia, both assigned to 21st Brigade Engineer Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), take part in training using LVC-IA version 4.0 April 15 outside the Lt. Gen. Harry W.O. Kinnard II Mission Training Complex.
Specialists Cody Stutz and Manuel Heredia, both assigned to 21st Brigade Engineer Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), take part in training using LVC-IA version 4.0 April 15 outside the Lt. Gen. Harry W.O. Kinnard II Mission Training Complex. (Photo Credit: Stephanie Ingersoll) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. – The Rakkasans are now among the first in the Army to use LVC-IA version 4.0, which allows commanders, leaders and mission command staffs to train as they fight. The simulated training was part of Rak Talon IV, a 3rd Brigade Combat Team command post and fires exercise using the new Command Post Integration Infrastructure, or CPI2, platforms.

Rakkasans tested the fourth iteration of the LVC-IA April 12-16 at Fort Campbell’s Lt. Gen. Harry W.O. Kinnard II Mission Training Complex with CPI2.

“Once the Rakkasans go through and we show everybody how it’s done, we’ll give the other brigades our lessons learned, so they can learn from our lessons,” said Capt. Andrew Laud, assistant brigade aviation officer for 3rd BCT.

The latest version of LVC-IA was tested at Fort Campbell earlier this year, with the help of Fort Carson, Colorado, and will eventually be fielded to the 10 remaining Army installations, said Kimberly Gilbert Mason, Live, Virtual, Constructive and Gaming coordinator at the KMTC.

Laud said LVC-IA, allows the implementation of realistic live training, but without the logistics, man-power and expense of having another brigade play the enemy in the field.

It will be especially helpful for seeing a larger picture of the battleground.

“Now we don’t need those additional personnel,” Laud said. “It really alleviates the stress and logistics, resources, ammo, trucks, all this additional stuff to do realistic training.”

The process begins with Soldiers uploading standard operating procedures, or SOPs, into the system. Soldiers will know whether the plans they came up with worked, or what needs to be changed and how. They can then adjust their plans and see how that scenario plays out in the simulation.

Laud said the technology is very helpful to 3rd BCT as they prepare for their next rotation at Joint Readiness Training Center-Fort Polk, Louisiana, in September.

“With CPI2 and all the new systems we are going to be using at JRTC, this is extremely important to be able to test everything because we don’t want JRTC being the first place we are making something work,” Laud said. “Being able to do this and then getting in at least one live iteration, for combined arms live fire, before we go into JRTC is going to be extremely helpful and make us successful at JRTC. Of course, if we are successful at JRTC, we think we will be able to be successful in real life, real world situations.”

Laud said the training also sets 3rd BCT apart from others because they will be one step ahead with the technology they use.

“Getting to be the first people to use this technology, we are really appreciative of that,” he said.

Sergeant First Class Michael Prater, plans operations noncommissioned officer-in-charge for 3rd BCT, said the setup for equipment is much easier and does not require the time it once did with earlier mod-els.

“Now we have a smaller footprint, a more mobile footprint, that makes operations easier to collapse, get out of an area, reset and go to a different area,” Prater said.

In the past, set up for training took a large chunk of the day, but now it can be done in as little as an hour, he said.

Staff Sergeant Patrick Fuller, nodal network systems operator with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd BCT, was happy for the extra training, which is needed to prepare for big events like JRTC.

“The big thing was to get the simulation feed,” Fuller said. “That is something we don’t have in a real-world environment, because we don’t have real enemies coming in and attacking us.”

He said the training brought together many elements.

“A lot of times our sections will be working separately, doing what they need to do, but this brought everyone together,” Fuller said. “All the Rak Talons staff training exercises we’ve done have brought all the staff together to work as a team and we’re getting to see that and get the kinks out. This is good training to see where our weaknesses are, where our strengths are and work on our weaknesses to get them all to strengths and then push that to JRTC to have a good rotation.”