• U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Jeremy Jackson, a course chief at the Fort Hood Air Assault School who is from New Orleans, stabilizes a rope from the ground as four of his instructors rappel out of a UH-60 Black Hawk hovering 85 feet above the ground as a demonstration for students of class 02-14, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School is a grueling 10-day course that qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations, to include aircraft orientation, sling load operations, proper rappelling techniques and fast-rope techniques. The high standards of the school require the student to take part in a 12-mile march with rucksack in under three hours on the morning of graduation to be awarded their wings. Every iteration of the Fort Hood Air Assault School begins with 132 students, and ends with an average of 80 graduates. On the day this photo was taken, class 02-14 was down to 46 students.  (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

    Air assault school rappel testing

    U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Jeremy Jackson, a course chief at the Fort Hood Air Assault School who is from New Orleans, stabilizes a rope from the ground as four of his instructors rappel out of a UH-60 Black Hawk hovering 85 feet above the ground as a...

  • Students and instructors of Fort Hood Air Assault School class 02-14 complete phase three rappel testing Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School is a grueling 10-day course that qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations, to include aircraft orientation, sling load operations, proper rappelling techniques and fast-rope techniques. The high standards of the school require the student to take part in a 12-mile march with rucksack in under three hours on the morning of graduation to be awarded their wings. Every iteration of the Fort Hood Air Assault School begins with 132 students, and ends with an average of 80 graduates. On the day this photo was taken, class 02-14 was down to 46 students.  (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

    Fort Hood Air Assault School students complete rappel testing

    Students and instructors of Fort Hood Air Assault School class 02-14 complete phase three rappel testing Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School is a grueling 10-day course that qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations...

  • U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Jeremy Stanton of Midland, Texas, an instructor at the Fort Hood Air Assault School, observes students as they descend 85 feet to the ground out of a UH-60 Black Hawk during phase three testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School is a grueling 10-day course that qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations, to include aircraft orientation, sling load operations, proper rappelling techniques and fast-rope techniques. The high standards of the school require the student to take part in a 12-mile march with rucksack in under three hours on the morning of graduation to be awarded their wings. Every iteration of the Fort Hood Air Assault School begins with 132 students, and ends with an average of 80 graduates. On the day this photo was taken, class 02-14 was down to 46 students.  (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

    Fort Hood Air Assault instructor keeps students safe

    U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Jeremy Stanton of Midland, Texas, an instructor at the Fort Hood Air Assault School, observes students as they descend 85 feet to the ground out of a UH-60 Black Hawk during phase three testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault...

  • Instructors at the Fort Hood Air Assault School prepare ropes for phase three rappel testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations, to include aircraft orientation, sling load operations, proper rappelling techniques and fast-rope techniques. The school itself is 10 days of rigorous, fast paced training. The high standards of the school require the student to take part in a 12-mile march with rucksack in under three hours on the morning of graduation to be awarded their wings. Every iteration of the Fort Hood Air Assault School begins with 132 students, and ends with an average of 80 graduates. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

    Rappel rope for air assault

    Instructors at the Fort Hood Air Assault School prepare ropes for phase three rappel testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations, to include aircraft orientation, sling load...

  • Fort Hood Air Assault instructor Sgt. Jon Garcia, from Santa Cruz, Cali., inspects the safety equipment of a UH-60 Black Hawk during phase three rappel testing of class 02-14, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations, to include aircraft orientation, sling load operations, proper rappelling techniques and fast-rope techniques. The school itself is 10 days of rigorous, fast paced training. The high standards of the school require the student to take part in a 12-mile march with rucksack in under three hours on the morning of graduation to be awarded their wings. Every iteration of the Fort Hood Air Assault School begins with 132 students, and ends with an average of 80 graduates. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

    Fort Hood Air Assault school instructor clips into Black Hawk

    Fort Hood Air Assault instructor Sgt. Jon Garcia, from Santa Cruz, Cali., inspects the safety equipment of a UH-60 Black Hawk during phase three rappel testing of class 02-14, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile...

  • Students of the Fort Hood Air Assault School watch four of their comrades get tested in rappelling as they wait their turn, Nov. 20, 2013. Students are required to tie their own harness in under 90 seconds, and rappel correctly 85 feet to the ground to pass. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th MPAD)

    Air Assault Schools tudents wait to rappel

    Students of the Fort Hood Air Assault School watch four of their comrades get tested in rappelling as they wait their turn, Nov. 20, 2013. Students are required to tie their own harness in under 90 seconds, and rappel correctly 85 feet to the ground to...

  • Students of Fort Hood Air Assault School class 02-14 rappel 85 feet out of a UH-60 Black Hawk during phase three testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School is a grueling 10-day course that qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations, to include aircraft orientation, sling load operations, proper rappelling techniques and fast-rope techniques. The high standards of the school require the student to take part in a 12-mile march with rucksack in under three hours on the morning of graduation to be awarded their wings. Every iteration of the Fort Hood Air Assault School begins with 132 students, and ends with an average of 80 graduates. On the day this photo was taken, class 02-14 was down to 46 students.  (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

    Air assault students rappel 85 feet out of UH-60 Black Hawks

    Students of Fort Hood Air Assault School class 02-14 rappel 85 feet out of a UH-60 Black Hawk during phase three testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School is a grueling 10-day course that qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault...

  • U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Jeremy Stanton of Midland, Texas, an instructor at the Fort Hood Air Assault School, untangles rope before phase three rappel testing of class 02-14, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School is a grueling 10-day course that qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations, to include aircraft orientation, sling load operations, proper rappelling techniques and fast-rope techniques. The high standards of the school require the student to take part in a 12-mile march with rucksack in under three hours on the morning of graduation to be awarded their wings. Every iteration of the Fort Hood Air Assault School begins with 132 students, and ends with an average of 80 graduates. On the day this photo was taken, class 02-14 was down to 46 students.  (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

    Fort Hood Air Assault School instructor shows students the ropes

    U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Jeremy Stanton of Midland, Texas, an instructor at the Fort Hood Air Assault School, untangles rope before phase three rappel testing of class 02-14, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School is a grueling 10-day course that qualifies...

  • Fort Hood Air Assault instructor Sgt. Anthony Eashman (center), from San Francisco, Cali., guides two students during phase three rappel testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations, to include aircraft orientation, sling load operations, proper rappelling techniques and fast-rope techniques. The school itself is 10 days of rigorous, fast paced training. The high standards of the school require the student to take part in a 12-mile march with rucksack in under three hours on the morning of graduation to be awarded their wings. Every iteration of the Fort Hood Air Assault School begins with 132 students, and ends with an average of 80 graduates. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

    Fort Hood Air Assault School conducts rappel tests

    Fort Hood Air Assault instructor Sgt. Anthony Eashman (center), from San Francisco, Cali., guides two students during phase three rappel testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter...

  • Fort Hood Air Assault instructor Sgt. Anthony Eashman (center), from San Francisco, Cali., guides two students during phase three rappel testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations, to include aircraft orientation, sling load operations, proper rappelling techniques and fast-rope techniques. The school itself is 10 days of rigorous, fast paced training. The high standards of the school require the student to take part in a 12-mile march with rucksack in under three hours on the morning of graduation to be awarded their wings. Every iteration of the Fort Hood Air Assault School begins with 132 students, and ends with an average of 80 graduates. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

    Fort Hood Air Assault School rappel testing

    Fort Hood Air Assault instructor Sgt. Anthony Eashman (center), from San Francisco, Cali., guides two students during phase three rappel testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter...

  • U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Randy Crigger, an instructor at the Fort Hood Air Assault School who hails from Kansas City, checks the harnesses of students in class 02-14 before they are tested on rappelling 85 feet out of a UH-60 Black Hawk, Nov. 20, 2013. Students must tie thier harnesses correctly in under 90 seconds to pass. Air Assault School is a grueling 10-day course that qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations, to include aircraft orientation, sling load operations, proper rappelling techniques and fast-rope techniques. The high standards of the school require the student to take part in a 12-mile march with rucksack in under three hours on the morning of graduation to be awarded their wings. Every iteration of the Fort Hood Air Assault School begins with 132 students, and ends with an average of 80 graduates. On the day this photo was taken, class 02-14 was down to 46 students.  (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

    Air Assault School instructor inspects student's harness

    U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Randy Crigger, an instructor at the Fort Hood Air Assault School who hails from Kansas City, checks the harnesses of students in class 02-14 before they are tested on rappelling 85 feet out of a UH-60 Black Hawk, Nov. 20, 2013...

  • Fort Hood Air Assault instructors Sgt. Jon Garcia (left), from Santa Cruz, Cali., and Sgt. 1st Class Jeremy Stanton, from Midland, Texas, untangle ropes before conducting phase three rappel testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations, to include aircraft orientation, sling load operations, proper rappelling techniques and fast-rope techniques. The school itself is 10 days of rigorous, fast paced training. The high standards of the school require the student to take part in a 12-mile march with rucksack in under three hours on the morning of graduation to be awarded their wings. Every iteration of the Fort Hood Air Assault School begins with 132 students, and ends with an average of 80 graduates. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

    Air Assault School instructors show students the ropes

    Fort Hood Air Assault instructors Sgt. Jon Garcia (left), from Santa Cruz, Cali., and Sgt. 1st Class Jeremy Stanton, from Midland, Texas, untangle ropes before conducting phase three rappel testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School qualifies soldiers...

  • U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Jeremy Stanton of Midland, Texas, instructs two students of Fort Hood Air Assault School class 02-14 as they prepare to rappel 85 feet out of a UH-60 Black Hawk during phase three testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School is a grueling 10-day course that qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations, to include aircraft orientation, sling load operations, proper rappelling techniques and fast-rope techniques. The high standards of the school require the student to take part in a 12-mile march with rucksack in under three hours on the morning of graduation to be awarded their wings. Every iteration of the Fort Hood Air Assault School begins with 132 students, and ends with an average of 80 graduates. On the day this photo was taken, class 02-14 was down to 46 students.  (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

    Rappel testing in Fort Hood Air Assault School

    U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Jeremy Stanton of Midland, Texas, instructs two students of Fort Hood Air Assault School class 02-14 as they prepare to rappel 85 feet out of a UH-60 Black Hawk during phase three testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School is a...

  • U.S. Army Sgt. Anthony Eashman, of San Francisco, Cali., instructs students of the Fort Hood Air Assault School class 02-14 during phase three rappel testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School is a grueling 10-day course that qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations, to include aircraft orientation, sling load operations, proper rappelling techniques and fast-rope techniques. The high standards of the school require the student to take part in a 12-mile march with rucksack in under three hours on the morning of graduation to be awarded their wings. Every iteration of the Fort Hood Air Assault School begins with 132 students, and ends with an average of 80 graduates. On the day this photo was taken, class 02-14 was down to 46 students.  (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

    Air Assault School instructor keeps Soldiers safe during rappel testing

    U.S. Army Sgt. Anthony Eashman, of San Francisco, Cali., instructs students of the Fort Hood Air Assault School class 02-14 during phase three rappel testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School is a grueling 10-day course that qualifies soldiers to...

  • Two students of the Fort Hood Air Assault School class 02-14 prepare to rappel 85 feet out of a UH-60 Black Hawk during phase three testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School is a grueling 10-day course that qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations, to include aircraft orientation, sling load operations, proper rappelling techniques and fast-rope techniques. The high standards of the school require the student to take part in a 12-mile march with rucksack in under three hours on the morning of graduation to be awarded their wings. Every iteration of the Fort Hood Air Assault School begins with 132 students, and ends with an average of 80 graduates. On the day this photo was taken, class 02-14 was down to 46 students.  (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

    Air Assault School students rappel 85 feet out of UH-60 Black Hawks

    Two students of the Fort Hood Air Assault School class 02-14 prepare to rappel 85 feet out of a UH-60 Black Hawk during phase three testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School is a grueling 10-day course that qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and...

  • Two students of Fort Hood Air Assault School class 02-14 approach the UH-60 Black Hawk they are about to rappel 85 feet out of during phase three testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School is a grueling 10-day course that qualifies soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations, to include aircraft orientation, sling load operations, proper rappelling techniques and fast-rope techniques. The high standards of the school require the student to take part in a 12-mile march with rucksack in under three hours on the morning of graduation to be awarded their wings. Every iteration of the Fort Hood Air Assault School begins with 132 students, and ends with an average of 80 graduates. On the day this photo was taken, class 02-14 was down to 46 students.  (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar, 7th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

    Air Assault School students approach Black Hawk for rappel testing

    Two students of Fort Hood Air Assault School class 02-14 approach the UH-60 Black Hawk they are about to rappel 85 feet out of during phase three testing, Nov. 20, 2013. Air Assault School is a grueling 10-day course that qualifies soldiers to conduct...

Instructors at the Fort Hood Air Assault School conducted rappel testing out of two UH-60 Black Hawks Nov. 20. Students in the course have to tie their own harnesses in under 90 seconds, and correctly rappel 85 feet to the ground to pass. Air Assault School qualifies Soldiers to conduct airmobile and air assault helicopter operations, to include aircraft orientation, sling load operations, proper rappelling techniques and fast-rope techniques. The school itself is 10 days of rigorous, fast paced training. The high standards of the school require the student to take part in a 12-mile march with rucksack in under three hours on the morning of graduation to be awarded their wings. Each class begins with 132 students, and ends with an average of 80 graduates. At the time these photographs were taken, class 02-14 was down to 46 students.

Page last updated Fri November 22nd, 2013 at 14:05