Receiving the colors
Brenda Lee McCullough, IMCOM-Readiness director, passes the colors to Col. Chad R. Foster, charging him with command of U.S. Army Garrison-Fort Hood during a change of command ceremony at Fort Hood, Texas, May 27. (Photo Credit: Blair Dupre, Fort Hood Public Affairs) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT HOOD, Texas - While speaking to the large crowd gathered in front of III Corps Headquarters here May 27, Col. Jason Wesbrock shared the “sobering” advice he received from then-Lt. Gen. Paul Funk, former III Corps and Fort Hood commander, two years ago as he took command of U.S. Army Garrison – Fort Hood.

“Very simply, he said, ‘Don’t screw up my hometown,’” Wesbrock shared.

After weathering more than his fair share of storms since taking command of the Fort Hood Garrison that rainy day two years ago, Wesbrock said Fort Hood may be a little dusty from the ride, but is stronger than ever.

Surrounded by family, friends and community leaders, Wesbrock officially handed over the reins of the Fort Hood Garrison to Col. Chad R. Foster during the traditional passing of the colors. Wesbrock handed the unit colors to Brenda Lee McCullough, director of U.S. Army Installation Management Command-Readiness, who passed the colors to Foster, officially charging him with the responsibility of the Fort Hood Garrison.

“I could talk for hours about Col. Jason Wesbrock’s contributions and their lasting impact on Fort Hood, but I know Jason would tell you the installation team is responsible for those accomplishments,” McCullough said. “What I will tell you is that commanding a garrison today is a challenging business and requires strong, resourceful and inspiring leadership.”

The role of the garrison commander is essentially to serve as the installation’s city manager, overseeing the everyday functions of the garrison staff, which helps make an installation run smoothly. The Fort Hood Garrison is comprised of one management and control office, six directorates, six installation support offices and two subordinate military units. Together, the nearly 6,000 employees in those offices provide support to the more than 360,000 Soldiers, Marines, Airmen, family members, civilians and retirees at Fort Hood.

“I’ve had a very privileged and unique opportunity to experience something that few in uniform get to do, and that’s the opportunity to look behind the curtain and see how the city that is Fort Hood runs,” Wesbrock said. “Our Fort Hood workforce consists of talented, quiet professionals who, regardless of conditions, ensures that Fort Hood continues to operate.”

Relinquishing command
Col. Jason Wesbrock passes the colors to Brenda Lee McCullough, IMCOM-Readiness director, symbolizing him relinquishing command of U.S. Army Garrison-Fort Hood during a change of command ceremony at Fort Hood, Texas, May 27. (Photo Credit: Blair Dupre, Fort Hood Public Affairs) VIEW ORIGINAL

Wesbrock will not go far, as he will serve as the chief of staff for First Army – Division West.

Addressing Foster, as he took command of the Fort Hood Garrison after last serving as the chief of staff of the Army’s Command Assessment Programs, McCullough said he has her full support as he begins his new role as the Fort Hood garrison commander.

“I am confident you will lead this garrison with the same professionalism, pride and expertise that you’ve demonstrated throughout your career,” McCullough added. “I look forward to see you, and the Fort Hood Garrison, build on recent successes, and begin planning and execution to enhance the Great Place.”

Foster said this is his third time at Fort Hood and he could not be happier to be at the Great Place. He said he looks forward about the opportunity to serve at Fort Hood once again.

“I would like to thank all you for allowing me to come home – home to my Army home,” Foster added. “If you’re the ones who taught me how to Soldier, you taught me how to survive and I could never repay you. I look forward to serving you over the next two years.”