Fabrizio Nardello, who retired in December 2021, served 42 years with U.S. Army Garrison Italy’s resource management office. A native of Vicenza, Nardello devoted his career to modernizing databases for the Army’s civilian recruitment process in Vicenza.
Fabrizio Nardello, who retired in December 2021, served 42 years with U.S. Army Garrison Italy’s resource management office. A native of Vicenza, Nardello devoted his career to modernizing databases for the Army’s civilian recruitment process in Vicenza. (Photo Credit: Anna Ciccotti) VIEW ORIGINAL

VICENZA, Italy - U.S. Army Garrison Italy’s resource management office is not quite the same without Fabrizio Nardello, who spent nearly four decades working there.

Nardello recently retired after 42 years. A Vicenza native, Nardello recalled that at age 21 he had just returned from a one-month stint in England, where he went to improve his English. In July 1978, he walked around the corner to Caserma Ederle, looking for work. Within weeks he started at the budget office.

“When I was first hired, most people were still using manual typewriters, ledgers, calculators and carbon papers. We were answering telephones, the ones with actual bells inside,” Nardello said. “Years later, desktop workstations became the newest rage. Technology enthusiasts like myself wondered how personal computers might revolutionize the workplace.”

With computers, Nardello pioneered developments at Caserma Ederle, to include database infrastructure and processes to modernize the Army’s manning database – not glamourous work yet vital nonetheless.

He embraced data structures and applied computer-based systems in support of the Vicenza’s civilian personnel office, raising the office’s effectiveness above any other overseas Army garrison. For these efforts and more, Nardello was recognized with several awards.

Now, colleagues look back at working with Nardello and recall how integral he was to the job.

“Fabrizio was the hardest working among us and did things that will forever change how we do business,” said Stefania Villanova, former colleague at RMO.

In turn, Nardello recalls how leaders empowered and inspired him to succeed, to include Ivo Bove and Ed Dunn.

“I was fortunate to have bosses that always supported me and gave me space to operate independently and work in autonomy,” Nardello said.

Training is key to a successful career with the Army, Nardello said. Being flexible, adaptable and becoming knowledgeable in a specific area are also important.

“This creates a sense of ownership and dedication to the mission. At the same time, employees feel that they are not just a number or a machine,” he said.

Now retired, Nardello cherishes quality time with his elderly parents and his lifelong passion – hiking the Dolomites. He’s also a globe-trotter. In October, after the fiscal year ends, Nardello was known to hit the road. He’s been to Australia, Peru, Africa, and the United States.

“As soon as conditions allow, I have plans to resume traveling and explore other parts of the world still on my bucket list,” he said.