Lt. Col, Warren Ford, Professor of Military Science for University of Central Oklahoma Army ROTC, prepares to receive his COVID vaccination from Cadet Morgan Scott, a nursing major and student in Ford’s Military Science IV class, March 5.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Lt. Col, Warren Ford, Professor of Military Science for University of Central Oklahoma Army ROTC, prepares to receive his COVID vaccination from Cadet Morgan Scott, a nursing major and student in Ford’s Military Science IV class, March 5. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
Cadet Morgan Scott, a nursing major and ROTC Cadet at the University of Central Oklahoma, reviews paperwork for Lt. Col, Warren Ford, Professor of Military Science for University of Central Oklahoma Army ROTC, before he is given the COVID vaccine March 5.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Cadet Morgan Scott, a nursing major and ROTC Cadet at the University of Central Oklahoma, reviews paperwork for Lt. Col, Warren Ford, Professor of Military Science for University of Central Oklahoma Army ROTC, before he is given the COVID vaccine March 5. (Photo Credit: Photo by Justin Bishop) VIEW ORIGINAL
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EDMOND, Oklahoma - Lt. Col. Warren Ford, Professor of Military Science for University of Central Oklahoma Army ROTC, was told to take a seat and roll up his sleeve March 5. Giving those instructions was Cadet Morgan Scott, a nursing major and student in Ford’s Military Science IV class. Following a review of paperwork Scott administered the vaccination to Ford.

Ford received the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. Scott described the difference between that vaccine compared to other COVID vaccines.

“Like Pfizer, this vaccine contains mRNA from the coronavirus. The mRNA signals the body to create a viral protein that is able to trigger an immune response when it’s detected,” Scott explained. “The other ingredients are used to stabilize and transport the mRNA during the process. These include lipids, sucrose, acetic acid, and salts.”

Scott went on to discuss the importance of following safety measures during the pandemic.

“I work in a hospital and most of our floors have been converted to COVID units. I’ve seen a lot of patients experiencing the worst time of their lives healthcare wise,” she said. “This pandemic has also been a strain on healthcare providers.”

“Any measure that can be taken to save a life makes a difference,” she continued. “Taking care of patients with COVID has been eye-opening. The safety measures are not only important, but are necessary in order to save lives. Wearing a mask and being cognizant is a small price to pay to ensure the health and safety of others.”

When asked what it felt like to administer the vaccine to Ford she replied, “It was a great experience and shows off the skills we learn outside of the ROTC program. It shows that my Army instructors are taking this serious and getting vaccinated. It takes a lot of courage to get a vaccine that was created in 10 months, but the science is there and it’s a step in the right direction to beat this thing.”

Following the 15-minute wait period after the vaccination, Ford had this to say about his experience, “I don’t think, at this point in time, that there is much we do that’s more important than following the guidelines for COVID mitigation; including getting the vaccine,” he said.

“COVID is the most significant public health crisis in 100 years. How can you not do everything you can to prevent spreading this virus? It’s a force protection issue,” added Ford. “As leaders we have a responsibility to do everything possible to protect our Soldiers and each other. I believe that the vaccine is safe and effective and that it’s a necessary tool to protect the force. Having my COVID vaccine administered by one of my Cadets was just an awesome opportunity.”

Ford said he was proud to have Scott be the person who administered his vaccine.

“Cadet Morgan Scott is just an amazing example of how our future leaders are already making an impact in our communities and in our Army. She is going to be an outstanding Army Nurse,” he said.

Scott did not start her college career in Army ROTC.

“I don’t have a lot of family in the military and there was very little influence to join. I needed to work harder to pay for college and saw ROTC as a good leadership program and scholarship opportunity,” she explained.

Scott walked into the ROTC department with a friend who was looking for more information. She soon enrolled, earned a ROTC scholarship and has been a standout Cadet ever since. In her short time in the UCO Army ROTC program she has: graduated from the Army Air Assault School, completed the Bataan Memorial Death March and will attend the Army Nurse Summer Training Program at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center this summer. She is also on the ROTC Ranger Challenge Team and member of the President’s Honor Roll.

The University of Central Oklahoma Army Reserve Officer’s Training Corps (ROTC) is designed to develop and train prospective Army officers. College students take ROTC classes and participate in related activities along with their normal college degree program, becoming an officer cadet and learning valuable leadership skills that are well-suited for either a military or civilian job.

Learn more about Army ROTC at UCO. If you have questions about the Nurse Corps, Army ROTC or scholarship opportunities contact UCO ROTC’s scholarship and enrollment officer at armyrotc@uco.edu.

About Army ROTC

Army ROTC is one of the best leadership courses in the country and is part of your college curriculum. Through classes and field training, Army ROTC provides you with the tools to become an Army Officer without interfering with your other classes. ROTC also provides you with discipline and money for tuition while enhancing your college experience.

Army ROTC offers pathways to becoming an Army Officer for high school students, current active duty Soldiers, and for current National Guard and Army Reserve Soldiers through the Simultaneous Membership Program.

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