Battalion recapitalizes Patriot air defense systems
The 6th Battalion, 52nd Air Defense Artillery receives new Patriot equipment during a six-month long recaitalization program.

SUWON AIR BASE, South Korea - Patriot air defense units in South Korea play a critical role in protecting Allied assets from the threat of tactical ballistic missiles.

In order to successfully execute their missions, air defense units must have the best equipment available.

For this reason, the 6th Battalion, 52nd Air Defense Artillery Regiment recently completed the Army-wide Recapitalization Program, which enhanced the readiness posture of the Patriot Missile System.

“This is a great program,” said Chief Warrant Officer 2 Gerald Davis, 6-52nd ADA’s Battalion Readiness Center officer-in- charge. “The RECAP definitely provided the necessary equipment face-lift for the Iron Horse Soldiers to continue to perform their mission at the highest caliber.”

Each firing battery that went through the Recapitalization Program, known as RECAP, received factory-rebuilt Patriot systems and support equipment over the last six months.

Davis and his Soldiers played an important role in facilitating the RECAP process.

“We served as the chief coordinator between the Low-Tier Project Office who issued the new equipment and the line units receiving them, ensuring a seamless transition,” Davis said.

However, the process is more complicated than it seems.

“We [Battalion Readiness Center] also must ensure that all new equipment are fielded properly and more importantly, validated for operation,” Davis said. “Sometime it was a long process.”

As the U.S. Army’s Patriot fleet continues to age, it becomes increasingly difficult, not to mention, expensive to maintain its readiness posture.

Several maintenance programs, such as the “Clean & Green” Deep Maintenance, were implemented in the past to prolong the lifespan of the current weapons system.

However, it became apparent to Army leaders that a complete system overhaul was necessary to maintain operation standard. A comprehensive Recapitalization reset the service life of the Patriot system.

Davis explained, “It will cost the Army and the taxpayers a lot more money to continue the piecemeal upgrades here and there than to do a complete upgrade of everything at once.”

Davis and his Soldiers also had a more immediate incentive to be part of this process.

“I can truly see the difference we are making as the result of the RECAP,” Davis said. “At the end of the day, I have the comfort to know that we are significantly contributing to the fight by ensuring all equipment are fully mission capable so that Soldiers can focus on the mission.”

Davis grew up in Baton Rouge, La., and was the middle child among three siblings. Since childhood, he has always been fascinated with air defense artillery. It was no surprise that when Davis first enlisted in the Army back in 1998, he chose Patriot Missile System Operator as his military occupational specialty.

Twelve years later, his passion for the Patriot system is still evident in his daily duty.

In order to successfully execute their missions, air defense units must have the best equipment available.

For this reason, the 6th Battalion, 52nd Air Defense Artillery Regiment recently completed the Army-wide Recapitalization Program, which enhanced the readiness posture of the Patriot Missile System.

“This is a great program,” said Chief Warrant Officer 2 Gerald Davis, 6-52nd ADA’s Battalion Readiness Center officer-in- charge. “The RECAP definitely provided the necessary equipment face-lift for the Iron Horse Soldiers to continue to perform their mission at the highest caliber.”

Each firing battery that went through the Recapitalization Program, known as RECAP, received factory-rebuilt Patriot systems and support equipment over the last six months.

Davis and his Soldiers played an important role in facilitating the RECAP process.

“We served as the chief coordinator between the Low-Tier Project Office who issued the new equipment and the line units receiving them, ensuring a seamless transition,” Davis said.

However, the process is more complicated than it seems.

“We [Battalion Readiness Center] also must ensure that all new equipment are fielded properly and more importantly, validated for operation,” Davis said. “Sometime it was a long process.”

As the U.S. Army’s Patriot fleet continues to age, it becomes increasingly difficult, not to mention, expensive to maintain its readiness posture.

Several maintenance programs, such as the “Clean & Green” Deep Maintenance, were implemented in the past to prolong the lifespan of the current weapons system.

However, it became apparent to Army leaders that a complete system overhaul was necessary to maintain operation standard. A comprehensive Recapitalization reset the service life of the Patriot system.

Davis explained, “It will cost the Army and the taxpayers a lot more money to continue the piecemeal upgrades here and there than to do a complete upgrade of everything at once.”

Davis and his Soldiers also had a more immediate incentive to be part of this process.

“I can truly see the difference we are making as the result of the RECAP,” Davis said. “At the end of the day, I have the comfort to know that we are significantly contributing to the fight by ensuring all equipment are fully mission capable so that Soldiers can focus on the mission.”

Davis grew up in Baton Rouge, La., and was the middle child among three siblings. Since childhood, he has always been fascinated with air defense artillery. It was no surprise that when Davis first enlisted in the Army back in 1998, he chose Patriot Missile System Operator as his military occupational specialty.

Twelve years later, his passion for the Patriot system is still evident in his daily duty.

Page last updated Thu June 30th, 2011 at 00:00