• General Peter W. Chiarelli, the Vice Chief of Staff of the Army, speaks to awardees and their families at the Combined Logistics Excellence Awards Banquet.

    GEN Chiarelli

    General Peter W. Chiarelli, the Vice Chief of Staff of the Army, speaks to awardees and their families at the Combined Logistics Excellence Awards Banquet.

  • LTG Mitchell H. Stevenson, Deputy Chief of Staff of the Army for Logistics, and Sergeant Major of the Army Raymond F. Chandler III, prepare to present a plaque to a winning unit at the Combined Logistics Excellence Awards Ceremony.

    LTG Stevenson and SMA Chandler

    LTG Mitchell H. Stevenson, Deputy Chief of Staff of the Army for Logistics, and Sergeant Major of the Army Raymond F. Chandler III, prepare to present a plaque to a winning unit at the Combined Logistics Excellence Awards Ceremony.

RICHMOND (May 17, 2011) -- Ninety-nine logistics units from throughout the Army were honored last week at the Army's 2011 Combined Logistics Excellence Awards (CLEA) in Richmond, Virginia.

On hand to recognize the winners for excellence in maintenance, deployment, and supply operations were General Peter W. Chiarelli, Vice Chief of Staff of the Army; Raymond F. Chandler III, Sergeant Major of the Army; and Lieutenant General Mitchell H. Stevenson, Deputy Chief of Staff of the Army for Logistics.

The 99 units are stationed in 28 states, five countries, and Puerto Rico. Many were involved in last year's historic logistics operations, when the Army moved out millions of pieces of equipment from Iraq and closed hundreds of bases as combat operations ended. Others were involved in moving 30,000 service members and their equipment into Afghanistan, as part of last year's surge, or providing humanitarian aid following the earthquake in Haiti.

"One of the things I like best about these awards is that they are presented to organizations, not individuals," General Chiarelli said. "Without a doubt there are exceptional people, stand-outs even, in each of the depots, companies, maintenance shops, combat support hospitals, installations, and units recognized. But this business of ours is a team sport, and in everything we do we succeed or fail as a team."

Sergeant Major of Army Chandler told the winners their contributions over the last year have been "miraculous" and that because of them "we continue to win our Nation's Wars." He said their job is far from done, especially when it comes to repairing equipment coming out of war zones. "After two years in theater, an armored truck has incurred 10 to 12 years of use," he said. "After two years, an aircraft has eight to 10 years of use. This year, nearly 100,000 pieces of equipment will be reset, which in the long run, will save us millions of dollars."

Last year marked the Army's largest logistics operation in six decades. Lieutenant General Stevenson said: "The herculean efforts of these units on a daily basis made it all possible. They are examples for the entire Nation of how far ingenuity, determination, teamwork, and skill can take us."

The honorees are from Active Army, Reserve, and National Guard installations, and went through a rigorous program to be considered for this award. The competition begins when an Army Command nominates one or more of its units based on published guidelines and regulations. From there, evaluators from the U.S. Army Transportation, Ordnance, and Quartermaster Centers, augmented by Army National Guard and Reserve Soldiers, travel worldwide to conduct on-site evaluations of the units nominated by their Commands.

Following is a list of the 99 CLEA winning and runner-up units:

Maintenance Excellence Awards

1. Depot Winner: Tobyhanna Army Depot, Tobyhanna, Pennsylvania
The Tobyhanna Army Depot Command Post Systems and Integration program team is transforming internal business procedures to streamline operations, eliminate waste, enhance quality, and increase production. Its innovative, rapid solutions meet demands of the warfighter by resolving logistics problems; reducing maintenance repair cycle times; and establishing strategies that improve fielding, training, sustainment, and extending the life of systems.

2. Depot Runner Up: Red River Army Depot, Texarkana, Texas
Red River Army Depot employees outperform expectations in deployment, establishment, and sustainment of Stored Theater Provided Equipment - Iraq. They focus on ensuring 169 combat tracked vehicles are maintained and sustained at fully mission capable rates and available within 96 hours of a request. Their application of Lean Six Sigma principles has resulted in an efficient operation, and reduced cycle time for receiving and unloading equipment convoys by 75 percent.

3. Active Army, Table of Organization and Equipment, Small Winner: B Battery, 2/20th Field Artillery, Fort Hood, Texas
This unit has an excellent driver's program and its shop operation is very organized. The unit has a very good Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services program. Soldiers go through phases of training including a hands-on portion and quiz to ensure they understand and properly execute tasks. The unit has a Forward Repair System that is very clean and well maintained.

4. Active Army, Table of Organization and Equipment, Small Runner Up: HHSC 1st Military Intelligence Battalion, Wiesbaden, Germany
Maintenance records are well managed and organized. HAZMAT area is controlled, clean, and organized. Soldiers have a genuine concern in the daily operations and maintenance of equipment they work on.

5. Active Army, Table of Organization and Equipment, Medium Winner: 317th Maintenance Company, Bamberg, Germany
The Communication and Electronic shop is very innovative in purging and servicing night Vision Goggles (NVGs). The shop created a system that allows it to purge multiple sets of NVGs, and reduce repair time and man-hours while conducting PRE-RESEST and RESET. Tools are properly accounted for and signed out from the tool room and the unit has excellent supply records. The shop areas are all very neat, clean, and well organized. All personnel are safety conscious while conducting operations.

6. Active Army, Table of Organization and Equipment, Medium Runner Up: D Company 6-101st Aviation Regiment, Fort Campbell, Kentucky
This unit performed maintenance under austere conditions while deployed in Afghanistan. It maintained an Operational Readiness rate above 70 percent on numerous types of aircraft. On numerous occasions its maintenance sections repaired damaged aircrafts below the required repair time. Its management of repair parts was crucial during unscheduled repairs.

7. Active Army, Table of Organization and Equipment, Large Winner: 2-4th Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Sill, Oklahoma
This unit was evaluated in a field environment at White Sands, N.M., 600 miles from their home station of Fort Sill, Okla. The unit drove its wheeled vehicles for two days without a vehicle breakdown. It has a very solid maintenance program, from Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services, to supply and tool accountability. The entire organization, from the battalion commander to the lowest ranking Soldier, is involved with maintenance. Every Soldier is energetic, eager to learn, and well-versed in roles and responsibilities.

8. Active Army, Table of Organization and Equipment, Large Runner Up: 532nd Military Intelligence Battalion, Camp Humphreys, Korea
In addition to being a split unit with one company several miles away, it has been in a holding pattern for several years, pending a motor pool completion project. Despite this, the unit continues to provide excellent maintenance on its equipment. All Soldiers are enthusiastic about Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services and can perform checks with little or no flaws. The tool room is in immaculate condition and has an excellent Test, Measurement and Diagnostic Equipment program, ensuring tools are calibrated in a timely manner.

9. Active Army, Table of Distribution and Allowances, Small Winner: USAG-Humphreys TMP, Camp Humphreys, Korea
This organization has one of the best maintenance management systems in place. Each maintenance clerk is well versed in all aspects of maintenance documents, all of which were available during the evaluation. The organization recently received its Standard Army Maintenance System equipment, and the maintenance clerks are working diligently to learn the system. The tool room is very organized and all tools are cleaned and calibrated.

10. Active Army, Table of Distribution and Allowances, Small Runner Up: USAG-Daegu Maintenance Division, Camp Henry/Camp Carroll, Korea
This unit has a very organized Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services program. It is involved with ensuring all drivers are performing correctly. It also has a well organized Quality Assurance/Quality Control section. Fuel and mileage accountability is well managed. Maintenance areas are very clean and organized. The supply section is very clean and organized, and its supply accountability is one of the best.

11. Active Army, Table of Distribution and Allowances, Medium Winner: HHC, U.S. Army Joint Multinational Training Command, Grafenwoehr, Germany
Maintenance and Supply records are extremely organized and kept for every piece of equipment for two years. The unit has made drastic improvements from last year at this same time, especially in the motor pool, arms, and NBC rooms. The tool room is very well organized and clean. The shop areas are clean and organized to improve efficiency in equipment repair.

12. Active Army, Table of Distribution and Allowances, Medium Runner Up: 39th Signal Battalion, Chievres, Belgium
The unit has a demanding mission, which requires them to be very smart about the systems it takes offline to conduct Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services. It does this flawlessly, ensuring that higher commands have systems at their disposal with no loss due to scheduled maintenance. The unit tracks Test, Measurement and Diagnostic Equipment vigorously. Maintenance records and training are tracked with both Standard Army Maintenance System equipment and on a unit-maintained website.

13. Active Army, Table of Distribution and Allowances, Large Winner: Army Field Support Battalion-North East Asia, Camp Carroll, Korea
This organization is very well versed in maintenance operations. Its standard operating procedure is very well written and every portion of the standard operating procedure is followed. All members of the organization know their responsibilities and carry them out with precision. This organization has the best Lean Six Sigma program the judges witnessed. They are constantly finding ways to improve their processes.

14. Active Army, Table of Distribution and Allowances, Large Runner Up: 58th Transportation Battalion, Ft Leonard Wood, Missouri
This unit has a great tool accountability program. The hazardous material program is well managed. Its supply accountability is flawless. Its shop supply is organized and showed improvements from the previous yearAca,!a,,cs evaluation.

15. Army Reserve, Table of Organization and Equipment, Small Winner: HHC 415th Chemical Brigade, Greenville, South Carolina
Unit personnel have a motivated attitude and strong desire to learn and improve. The executive officer says she directs all their supported units to submit packets for the CLEA as a way to focus the units on developing excellence and continued improvement.

16. Army Reserve, Table of Organization and Equipment, Medium Winner: 238th Maintenance Company, San Antonio, Texas
The unit's driver training program is very well managed, and its safety programs are some of the best. The Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear section is up to date and in great shape. The unit has a robust cross training program. Its shops put together a robust forward operating base support package for servicing items such as M4K Forklifts and M1000 trailers. The dynamic part about this unit's strength is that 50 percent of the Soldiers are cross leveled and many Soldiers are out of their military operational specialty but are being trained in needed tasks.

17. Army Reserve, Table of Organization and Equipment, Medium Runner Up: 471st Engineer Company, Ft Buchanan, Puerto Rico
Command emphasis is a strong element of this unit's maintenance program and is briefed in its yearly training plan. A testament to this strength is the E5 mechanic's ability to step up and fill the void of the vacant E7 Motor Sergeant position.

18. Army Reserve, Table of Organization and Equipment, Large Winner: 346th Transportation Battalion, Ceiba, Puerto Rico
This battalion is very successful in adapting to the structural transformation of its units, while maintaining force modernization of equipment and keeping Soldiers qualified in their military operational specialty.

19. Army Reserve, Table of Distribution and Allowances, Small Winner: Area Maintenance Support Activity # 101 (G), St Joseph, Minnesota
It is obvious that customer service is a priority for this shop and not simply a catch phrase. The personnel's high level of maintenance and leadership experience projects through a positive and motivated attitude to support all their customer units. The Supervisor had a proactive approach toward interacting with customers as well as managing work order backlog.

20. Army Reserve, Table of Distribution and Allowances, Small Runner Up: Area Maintenance Support Activity #57(G), New Century, Kansas.
This shop has an aggressive approach toward building its workload. It is apparent that the shop personnel have a strong team effort that promotes battle rhythm within the organization.

21. National Guard, Table of Organization and Equipment, Small Winner: FSC 1140th Engineer Battalion, Cape Girardeau, Missouri
The unit scored the highest of all National Guard units evaluated in this activity. A strong supervised Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services program resulted in the unit's readiness rate above 98 percent during the past year. All tools, sets kits, and outfits are extremely clean and organized for accountability. The unit maintains an excellent working relationship with its supporting field maintenance shop.

22. National Guard, Table of Organization and Equipment, Small RunnerUp: D Battery 2-174th Maneuver Air Missile Defense Battalion, McConnelsville, Ohio
The unit is well organized with great standard operating procedures and a very good supervised Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services program. All members are proficient in their military operational specialty and work hard to improve policies and procedures in the unit's maintenance program. They had a large number of items enrolled in the calibration program with a zero percent delinquent rate for calibration.

23. National Guard, Table of Organization and Equipment, Medium Winner: 267th Maintenance Company Lincoln, Nebraska
The unit has a very good driver training program with all required training documented. The command has a strong emphasis on maintenance with support from senior enlisted personnel and officers at all levels. The weapons and equipment are clean and revealed a strong supervised Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services program for all equipment. The maintenance section is doing an outstanding job closing the loop on all required paper work for equipment.

24. National Guard, Table of Organization and Equipment, Medium Runner-Up: 153rd Military Police Company, Delaware City, Delaware
The unit maintains a readiness rate of 95 percent, contributing to a strong supervised Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services program. The unit maintains a strong maintenance training program using all available resources in the state. The Standard Army Maintenance System equipment data was validated with wheel vehicles with no deficiencies.

25. National Guard, Table of Organization and Equipment, Large Winner: 216th Engineer Battalion, Cincinnati, Ohio
The unit has a strong maintenance awards program and the results show in the repairs and services performed by the unit. This unit is the most improved from participating in the program last year. The condition of all equipment revealed a strong supervised Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services program. The Standard Army Maintenance System equipment data was validated against the unit's equipment with no deficiencies.

26. National Guard, Table of Organization and Equipment, Large Runner-Up: 113th Sustainment Brigade, Greensboro, North Carolina
This unit recently had a significant change and was preparing for deployment but did a great job on training Soldiers on new equipment. The unit supply room did an outstanding job of tool box accountability and shortages. The driver training program is very efficient and all required documentation is on hand for validation.

27. National Guard, Table of Distribution and Allowances, Small Winner: Combined Support Maintenance Shop-Oregon, Clackamas, Oregon
This facility scored the highest for this activity. The shop has an outstanding standard operating procedure and safety program. The technicians are well trained and the quality control program is the best the judges evaluated. The shop is performing repairs and services in a timely manner with minimal backlog. Management is doing a great job with their awards and incentives.

28. National Guard, Table of Distribution and Allowances, Small Runner-Up: Field Maintenance Shop # 12 West Paducah, Kentucky
This shop is the most improved facility from the past year's competition. The facility is clean and state of the art. The repair parts are being managed with all required documentation. The safety and environmental program is noteworthy.

29. National Guard, Table of Distribution and Allowances, Medium Winner: Combined Support Maintenance Shop, Raleigh, North Carolina
The State of North Carolina has dominated this category for the past few years and continued to shine as a well organized facility. The shop scored well in the readiness and supply operations due to well trained technicians. The state has a strong command emphasis on awards programs from the senior enlisted and officers at all levels. The technicians are very proficient at their duties and responsibilities and knowledgeable on their shop standard operating procedures.

30. National Guard, Table of Distribution and Allowances, Medium RunnerUp: 183rd Regional Training Institute Maintenance And Supply Shop, Ft Pickett, Virginia
This was the unit's first year to participate in the program. The facility is new and well designed for maintenance and supply training. The record keeping in the maintenance section is noteworthy. The Standard Army Maintenance System equipment data is validated with no deficiencies. The environmental program is noteworthy.

31. All Others, Small Winner: 6981st Civilian Support Group, Mannheim, Germany
This unitAca,!a,,cs 1,000 plus lines of repair parts are organized and placed in the proper location; the unit has 100 percent accountability. The supply section is organized, clean, and the employees are proud to display their area. The vehicle maintenance section, although small, maintains services and unscheduled maintenance with no flaws. The HAZMAT area is exceptionally organized and a model for units to follow.

32. All Others, Small Runner Up: Busan Storage Center, Busan, Korea
This organization is well versed in maintenance operations. The Maintenance section takes pride in daily operations -- all members are energetic and proud of their maintenance operation. The entire workforce, including the Commander, is at the forefront when it comes to maintenance operations. They continuously strive to find ways to improve their operation and cut costs.

33. All Others, Medium Winner: Maintenance Activity, Vilseck, Vilseck, Germany
Shop areas are very organized and clean. All personnel are safety conscious. During the judge's evaluation, leadership was not available due to training, but this did not impede the operations. The employees show extreme competence with the day to day operations. Supply personnel are diverse and knowledgeable, allowing flexibility in this section. The allied trades section fabricated some much needed tools for units that are not available in the supply system, allowing them to more easily work on weapons.

34. All Others, Medium Runner Up: Installation Materiel Maintenance Activity, Fort McCoy, Wisconsin
This unit is extremely safety conscious, ensuring the evaluators had personal protective equipment prior to entering its facility. The tool room is a vast improvement over last year's evaluation. While no tactical vehicles are owned by the unit, personnel are trained and licensed to drive, ensuring that they are able to drive safely. While conducting Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services on organic equipment the workers follow the locally-produced checklist.

35. All Others, Large Winner: Material Maintenance Division, Ft Bragg, North Carolina
This organization has a "world class" publication section. The supply warehouse made significant improvements and is totally organized. Its bench stock inventory is flawless and everyone in the supply section is very well-versed in daily operations. Each area in the maintenance division is organized, each employee is knowledgeable, and the entire operation is flawless. They are constantly involved in Lean Six Sigma projects resulting in cost savings and improvements to their daily operations.

36. All Others, Large Runner Up: Maintenance Activity, Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern, Germany
Maintenance Activity Kaiserslautern continuously strives in cost saving measures. Its apprenticeship program is the best program evaluated by the judges. The driver training program is very well managed and everyone participates in annual sustainment training. Every section has multiple points set up for safety, as well as utilizing a central point in each shop to stock special tools, decreasing the amount of time it takes a worker to retrieve a special tool.

37. Aviation Winner: 3rd Military Intelligence (Aerial Exploitation), Camp Humphreys, Korea
The leadership involvement in aviation and ground maintenance programs clearly identify them as winners. From the Battalion Commander and Command Sergeants Major down to the lowest level, all are actively involved in Command Maintenance. Preventive Maintenance Checks and Services on weapons and masks are performed by the assigned individuals. Weapons are cleaned and serviced. Maintenance documents are filled out correctly and maintained. Standard operating procedures are being followed in all areas.

Deployment Excellence Awards

38. All Army Operational Deployment, Small Winner: Regimental Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 2nd Striker Cavalry, Rose Barracks, Vilseck, Germany
This unit deployed from Vilseck, Germany to Afghanistan replacing the 82nd Airborne Division. It assumed the role of Task Force Zabul with the mission of helping to work towards bringing peace to the Afghanistan people. Soldiers are partnering with Afghan National Security Forces and other International Stabilization Forces to form Combined Team Zabul, whose mission is to conduct population oriented operations and neutralize insurgent activity in key terrain, and to promote freedom of movement for the Afghanistan people.

39. All Army Operational Deployment, Small Runner Up: B, Battery, 1st Battalion, 182nd Field Artillery, Detroit, Michigan
The unit deployed from Fort McCoy, Wis.; where they trained before heading to Kuwait. The 130 member group deployed to Kuwait Naval Base in November 2010 in support of Operation New Dawn in order to provide base security and force protection. Particularly noteworthy was the error-free preparation of deployment documentation.

40. All Army Operational Deployment, Large Winner: 3rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii
This Brigade deployed from Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, to the National Training Center, Fort Irwin, Calif., in preparation for its mission in Afghanistan. Its emphasis on Unit Movement Officer training gave it a firm foundation in the development and maintenance of unit movement data. The Brigade ran an extremely successful centralized container out-load operation that minimized required containers by consolidating equipment and ensured hazardous cargo was recognized and shipped properly. The unit completed its movement ahead of schedule.

41. All Army Operational Deployment, Large Runner Up: 1st Battalion, 119th Field Artillery, Charlotte, Michigan
The 1st Battalion, 119th Field Artillery Regiment of the Michigan Army National Guard deployed with 530 Soldiers from Fort McCoy, Wis., to Camp Virginia, Kuwait, in November 2010 in support of Operation New Dawn. The Battalion's missions range from multi-national general support, to providing convoy security, to movements from Kuwait to Iraq.

42. Active Army, Small Deploying Unit Winner A Battery, 5-7 Air Defense Artillery Battalion, Kaiserslautern, Germany
In March 2010, Alpha Battery deployed to Morag, Poland, to conduct PATRIOT familiarization training with the Polish Air Force. The unit exceeded all Army standards during its deployment in support of the PATRIOT exercise and demonstrated the ability to efficiently deploy its 51 pieces of equipment, 24 containers, and 83 personnel. The unit executed its deployment through excellent logistical and operational planning. Despite the complexity of the movement, the Battery excelled and completed all tasks necessary to complete the mission.

43. Active Army, Small Deploying Unit Runner Up: 240th Quartermaster Supply Company, Bamberg, Germany
The Company deployed 120 personnel to Afghanistan in support of theater opening; distribution; and reception, staging, onward movement, and integration functions. The unit deployed as a newly modularized unit with its organic assets and capabilities to support brigade support battalions and forward support companies and provide backup support to echelons above division, within a Corps area of operations.

44. Active Army, Large Deploying Unit Winner: 2nd Battalion (Airborne), 503rd Infantry, Vicenza, Italy
The unit deployed from its training site in Germany to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The battalion deployed 823 paratroopers to nine different locations throughout Afghanistan, and 95 paratroopers to a rear detachment in VMC. The unit deployed 11,341 pieces of equipment to nine combat outposts and forward operating bases throughout Afghanistan. The unit maintained 100 percent personnel and equipment accountability throughout the deployment process, and the battalion met and exceeded required timelines.

45. Active Army, Large Deploying Unit Runner Up: 54th Engineer Battalion, Bamberg, Germany
The battalionAca,!a,,cs deployment to Afghanistan was successful. Its skilled, professional, and proficient logistics operations planning ensured the safe and efficient deployment of 759 personnel and 132 pieces of cargo containing more than 3, 000 pieces of equipment to six different locations in Afghanistan. The unit excelled in equipment preparation, documentation, and met all deployment timelines and standards.

46. Active Army, Supporting Unit Winner: 14th Transportation Battalion (MC), Vicenza, Italy
The battalion supported OIF/OND by coordinating and synchronizing the deployment and redeployment of more than 400 units, including the rotation of 18 brigade-sized units into and out of Iraq. Simultaneously, the battalion was also executing the Responsible Drawdown of Forces in Iraq. This added significant complexity to their support of deployment and redeployment of 40 brigades. The battalion also took the lead in the transition from TRANS LOG WEB to Transportation Coordinator's Automated Information System II, Theater Operations.

47. Active Army, Supporting Unit Runner Up: 39th Transportation Battalion, Kaiserslautern, Germany
The Battalion supported deployments of United States Army Europe units to OIF and OEF, Africa, the Balkans; and numerous training and humanitarian support missions. They ensured deploying unit requirements were entered correctly in the Defense Transportation System and that the units received transportation support when it was needed. They always met critical deployment air and sea schedules. The board and the validation team selected the unit because of outstanding deployment support provided to numerous units deploying and redeploying.

48. Army Installation, CONUS Winner: U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Bragg, Fort Bragg, North Carolina
Fort Bragg successfully redeployed Soldiers from combat deployments and at the same time deployed a full Brigade Combat Team and many enablers to support humanitarian relief efforts in Haiti. The Fort Bragg Team deployed nearly 373 military and civilian aircraft, carrying nearly 4,000 Soldiers and relief personnel along with more than 500 vehicles and 5,200 short tons of materiel and supplies. In addition, the Fort Bragg Team airdropped 152 Container Delivery Systems, each carrying nearly one ton of water and rations, and more than 700 additional systems were prepared to drop, if needed.

49. Army Installation, CONUS Runner Up: Fort Hood, Fort Hood, Texas
Fort Hood conducted deployment operations that moved 20,000 Active and Reserve Component Soldiers, 377 airplanes, 1,812 rail cars, and 48 ships with over 23,000 pieces of equipment in support of OND, OEF, the National Training Center, Unified Endeavor (Virginia), and Haiti's preparation and execution of Global Full Spectrum Operations. Team Hood's focus on deployment operations provided commanders with the highest level of confidence and allowed them to concentrate on preparation for theater operations.

50. Army Installation, OCONUS Winner: U.S. Army Garrison,Vicenza, Italy
US Army Garrison-Vicenza deployed and redeployed more than 5,000 Soldiers and 260 short tons of equipment supporting USAFRICOM, USCENTCOM, and USEUCOM missions. USAG Vicenza's direct deployment support to the 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team and 14th Transportation Battalion for OEF and OIF/OND demonstrated its commitment to excellence, unwavering dedication, and exceptional deployment operations.

51. Army Installation, OCONUS Runner Up: U.S. Army Garrison-Baumholder, Germany
US Army Garrison-Baumholder deployed 623 pieces of equipment and 202 Soldiers while simultaneously reintegrating 145 Soldiers from 92nd Military Police Company. The staff processed 913 Soldiers for pre-deployment along with multiple tasks associated with preparing more than 4,000 Soldiers and their family members for the 170th Infantry Battalion Combat Team's deployment in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Despite complex coordination requirements, the USAG Baumholder Team excelled in every aspect of the deployment process.

52. Army Reserve, Small Deploying Unit Winner: Headquarters And Headquarters Company, United States Army Civil Affairs And Psychological Operations Command, Fort Bragg, North Carolina
The Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations Command Headquarters and Headquarters Company deployed 30 Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations teams and 24,816 pieces of equipment in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom and other contingency operations from Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Headquarters and Headquarters Company supported Iraqi officials as advisors on civil-military operations, supporting the country's economic development, and assisting orphanages and children in need.

53. Army Reserve, Small Deploying Unit Runner Up: 811th Ordnance Company, Rainelle, West Virginia
The 811th Ordnance Company deployed its 3rd Platoon as a stand-alone unit to Afghanistan in support of OEF and OIF. The Platoon provided support for the Satellite Maintenance Facility located at the forward Ammunition Supply Point and repaired all malfunctions with the equipment at that site. The Platoon's three person teams operated the Field Ammunition Supply Point and Basic Load Ammunition Holding Area.

54. Army Reserve, Large Deploying Unit Winner: Special Troops Battalion, 377th Theater Sustainment Command / Belle Chasse, Louisiana
The Special Troops Battalion, 377th Theater Sustainment Command deployed approximately 150 Soldiers to Port-au-Prince, Haiti, after the earthquake to provide humanitarian aid to the Haitian people, as well as sustainment services to the thousands of service members conducting their missions in the Port-au-Prince area. The STB 377th TSC, which assumed the Joint Logistics Command in Haiti, conducted more than 3,000 humanitarian aid support missions, deployed more than 2, 900 containers and 3,400 pallets consisting of 2.2 million rations, and 1.2 million pounds of bulk food items; and the command's water purification unit produced more than 1.1 million gallons of drinking water.

55. Army Reserve, Large Deploying Unit Runner Up: 642nd Regional Support Group, Decatur, Georgia
From 26 May through 27 June 2010, the 642nd Regional Support Group (RSG) deployed more than 1,700 Soldiers from Decatur, Ga., to an austere environment in Bahrain in support of Combat Support Training Exercise 91. The group successfully executed sustainment operations during the training exercise which enabled training units to focus on their preparations for deployment. The 642nd RSG had overall responsibility of running 24-hour operations for space allocation and utilization of the base resources.

56. Army Reserve, Supporting Unit Winner: 11th Aviation Command, Fort Knox, Kentucky
The 11th Aviation Command provided seamless integration of multiple units deploying from various U.S. locations, coordinating three modes of transportation (commercial air, contract air, and self deployment), so they could arrive in theater on schedule and ready to execute the mission in support of Operations Task Force Aviation. Use of three separate modes of transportation greatly complicated command and control issues, compounding deployment complexity during critical junctures. Three CH47s with maintainers and equipment deployed from Olathe, Kan. Once on location in Entebbe, Uganda, and before the arrival of CH47 aircraft, Task Force Aviation had to reposition personnel to Kitgum, a district in northern Uganda, to support forward operations.

57. Army Reserve, Supporting Unit Runner Up: 1397th Deployment And Distribution Support Battalion, Vallejo, California
The battalion deployed to bases in Kuwait, Iraq, and Afghanistan in support of OIF and OEF to perform the CENTCOM container management mission for the entire area of operations, and providing oversight and guidance for container related-policy implementation. The battalion deployed on short notice and met all timelines. The 1397th DDSB managed the Integrated Booking System-Container Management Module, the centralized database that provides visibility of containers. The CME reduced monthly container detention costs to below $1.7 million, validated over 225,000 containers, audited 479 yards, reconciled 34,902 containers, and reduced detention cost by $1 million within the first three months.

58. Army National Guard, Small Deploying Unit Winner: B Company, 3rd Battalion, 20th Special Forces Group, Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina
The company successfully prepared and deployed 34 Soldiers and equipment in two separate elements, one detachment with the 3rd Battalion, 20th Special Forces (Airborne) and one detachment with 1st Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne), to Afghanistan. Each of the individual detachment deployments met the timelines set by 3rd Battalion, 20th Special Forces Group (Airborne) and United States Army Special Forces Command.

59. Army National Guard, Small Deploying Unit Runner Up: Headquarters And Headquarters Company, 732nd Combat Sustainment and Support Battalion, Tomah, Wisconsin
The company's 80 Soldiers redeployed from Iraq in April 2010, after spending 11 months delivering supplies in Iraq and transferring 7,000 pieces of military equipment back to the United States or laterally to Afghanistan. The 732nd CSSB headquarters unit, stationed at Camp Tallil, provided logistical support for between 10 and 12 forward operating bases in southern Iraq, as well as areas north and west of Baghdad, and supported the 1st Infantry Division in Iraq and the Iraqi Army in their security missions with food, water, and transportation vehicles. The HHC, 732nd CSSB simultaneously executed a major reorganization for mobilization to Iraq and executed substantial drawdown operations resulting in an extremely efficient redeployment.

60. Army National Guard, Large Deploying Unit Winner: 53rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, Pinellas Park, Florida
The 53rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, consisting of 2,500 members of the Florida National Guard, deployed in the largest single unit deployment of Florida National Guard since World War II, for a year-long mission in Kuwait and Iraq. They are responsible for various security missions, including providing convoy security for coalition forces entering and departing Iraq. Prior to their deployment, the Soldiers receive additional training at Fort Hood, Texas.

61. Army National Guard, Large Deploying Unit Runner Up: 30th Heavy Brigade Combat Team, Clinton, North Carolina
While deployed, the brigade conducted full-spectrum operations in Iraq, centralized mainly on building civil infrastructure, to include water and electricity, and training Iraqi Security Forces to effectively manage security for the people of the region. The brigade brought hope to the region with water, school, road, sewer, and electrical projects. But taking the fight to the enemy did not come without a cost. The 30th HBCT suffered 29 wounded in action and seven killed in action. The 30th HBCT had 8,500 Soldiers from North Carolina, West Virginia and Colorado National Guard; and 30,000 pieces of equipment, demobilized at Fort Stewart, Georgia.

62. Army National Guard, Supporting Unit Winner: Camp Atterbury Joint Maneuver Training Center, Edinburgh, Indiana
Camp Atterbury deployed the 86th Infantry Brigade Combat Team in support of OEF. Mobilization required a movement of 3,342 personnel from 36 different unit identification codes, 235 twenty-foot containers, 114 triple containers, and 77 pieces of rolling stock in addition to 442 pieces of unit training equipment for shipment to home station. This mission entailed personnel, units, and equipment coming together from multiple states with unique equipment to build the Brigade Combat Team. Camp AtterburyAca,!a,,cs exceptional performance of duty and actions performed included coordinating installation support, Soldier Readiness Processing, and commercial transportation support.

63. Army National Guard, Supporting Unit Runner Up: Joint Force Headquarters-Ohio, Columbus, Ohio
These Soldiers and civilians provided outstanding support to seven Ohio Army National Guard units in support of Integrated Booking System/Container Management Module/Operation New Dawn. They processed 2,500 Soldiers and approximately 190 chartered buses to transport them to their prescribed training sites, and processed over 1,750 passengers to fly within a 36-hour timeframe. Four trains were also successfully loaded with 600 pieces of equipment and shipped to Camp Shelby, Miss.

Supply Excellence Awards

64. Active Army, Level I, Unit Supply Modified Table of Organization and Equipment Winner: B Company, 53rd Signal Battalion, Fort Meade, Maryland
The Supply Sergeant in this unit saw this competition as an opportunity to excel. She credits the Soldiers, the company command team, battalion and brigade staff for their support and assistance. Command emphasis was genuinely evident as this unit had precise accountability of Army property and used all regulatory measures to conduct its day-to-day operations. The knowledge of this unitAca,!a,,cs personnel is exemplary as they met or exceeded Department of the Army Standards in all phases of supply operations.

65. Active Army, Level I, Unit Supply Modified Table of Organization and Equipment Runner-Up: E Company, 1-1 Air Defense Artillery Battalion, Okinawa, Japan
This unit understands the importance of property accountability and how it affects its operational and mission readiness as it provides support to conduct counter air and missile defense operations protecting critical assets on Okinawa, Japan. The unit wholeheartedly embraced the concept of supply discipline and credits its leadership for the support it receives in enforcing accountability of all supplies and equipment.

66. Active Army, Level I, Unit Supply Table of Distribution and Allowances Winner: F Battery, 1st Battalion, 19th Field Artillery, Fort Sill, Oklahoma
Command emphasis and support from its leadership is evident in this unit. From the day-to-day operations to its strict accountability of hand receipts in this training unit, its commitment to following Army regulatory requirements is outstanding. The NCO in charge is exceptionally knowledgeable of the Command Supply Discipline Program and credited the entire Fort Sill logistics community with providing guidance and assistance as he prepared for the competition.

67. Active Army, Level I, Unit Supply Table of Distribution and Allowances Runner-Up: Maintenance Activity Vilseck (MAV), Theater Logistics Support Center-Europe, Vilseck, Germany
MAV reached the runner-up level because of the dedication and motivation of the employees. Its supply operations area is spotless and well organized; it is highly evident that this is a cohesive, perfectly trained team that works well together in providing support to customers. This was reflected in the 70 plus Interactive Comment Evaluations received this past year, all with very positive comments. Its recordkeeping is faultless, as is its property accountability.

68. Active Army, Level II, Property Book, Modified Table of Organization and Equipment
Winner: 2nd Heavy Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kansas
This unit was in the midst of deploying during the evaluation, but because of its already established high standards for property accountability and management, its operation was exceptionally impressive. This unit attributes its success to the collective assistance provided by their Division G4, the Command Maintenance Evaluation and Training Team, and the Inspector General along with its own motivation to excel.

69. Active Army, Level II, Property Book, Modified Table of Organization and Equipment Runner Up: 4th Military Information Support Operations Group (Airborne), Fort Bragg, North Carolina
The property book officer for this organization saw the competition as an opportunity to challenge himself and his staff. Because of their dispersed mission, with Soldiers and equipment located in 28 countries, property accountability is a unique challenge; however from the evaluator's standpoint this unit exceeded Army requirements in ensuring that all property account holders accurately maintain accountability of their assigned property. This unit has strong support from its command and strictly adheres to the Command Supply Discipline Program.

70. Active Army, Level lI, Property Book, Table of Distribution and Allowances Winner: 719th Military Intelligence Battalion, USAG Humphreys, Korea
Supply and property accountability are top priorities in this unit. The S4 and property book officer work diligently as a team to implement an aggressive Command Supply Discipline Program. They ensure compliance with Army regulations, policies and ALARACT messages. This is a well organized unit that demands excellence in property accountability and fiscal responsibility.

71. Active Army, Level lI, Property Book, Table of Distribution and Allowances Runner-Up 21st Cavalry Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas
The property book personnel in this unit are well versed in regulatory requirements and have one of the most extensive up-to-date publications libraries. Their meticulous Army Records Management Information Management System files and supporting documents are particularly noteworthy. This unit maintains 100 percent accountability of all its property and clearly goes the extra mile in every aspect of its operation.

72. Active Army, Level III, Parent Level, Modified Table of Organization and Equipment
Winner: 532nd Military Intelligence Battalion, 501st Military Intelligence Brigade, USAG Humphreys, Korea
This organization conducts effective monthly military operational specialty low density training events as well as a week-long logistics conference to baseline training and supply operations within the battalion. They have strong command support, including multiple brigade staff visits, and an exceptional Command Supply Discipline Program.

73. Active Army, Level III, Parent Level, Modified Table of Organization and Equipment Runner-Up: 204th Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Carson, Colorado
The CommandAca,!a,,cs emphasis on logistics and the Command Supply Discipline Program, along with the support and assistance provided by its own Command Maintenance Evaluation and Training Team, enabled it to succeed during the evaluation process. While this unit was also in the midst of preparing for deployment, it had established procedures in place for conducting supply operations to standard routinely.

74. Active Army, Level III, Parent Level, Table of Distribution and Allowances
Winner: 715th Military Intelligence Battalion, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii
This unit credits its achievement on its drive for excellence. It has a strong training program that extends to subordinate units, and it includes weekly low density military operational specialty training. It has established a Logistics Warrior of the Quarter competition that recognizes the skills and knowledge of supply personnel. Strong emphasis is placed on monitoring the Command Supply Discipline Program.

75. Active Army, Level IV, Supply Support Activity, Modified Table of Organization and Equipment Winner: 595th Maintenance Company, Supply Point 51, Yongsan, Korea
As a repeat winner, this unit continues its dedication and commitment to excellence. Once again it has proven its adherence to the Command Supply Discipline Program by receiving a commendable rating during the CSDP inspection. The support provided by its chain of command ensures that its multi-class customer support is second to none. The non-commissioned officers, Soldiers, and civilians are well trained, versatile and able to work in any section. The warehouse layout remains the epitome of efficiency.

76. Active Army, Level IV, Supply Support Activity, Modified Table of Organization and Equipment Runner-Up: Headquarters & Headquarters Company, 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne), Fort Campbell, Kentucky
This unit supports the ArmyAca,!a,,cs only Special Operation Aviation assets and requires the capabilities of operating on a no-notice, no fail and worldwide basis. Because of its limited number of Soldiers, it has adapted unique solutions to support multiple locations. The unit continually competes in this program to ensure it is maintaining an efficient operation.

77. Active Army, Level IV, Supply Support Activity, Table of Distribution and Allowances
Winner: Aviation Center Logistics Command, Fort Rucker, Alabama
A repeat winner, this unit is operated by the Army Fleet Support contract which provides timely and efficient logistical support to five airfields and an Aircraft Maintenance Support Shop. Its objective, clearly visible, is to enhance logistical readiness and supply effectiveness while maintaining strict adherence to the Command Supply Discipline Program. This unit's layout and organization is well thought out for maximum efficiency. The entire staff is well trained in all functions and they take great pride in performing the mission.

78. Active Army, Level IV, Supply Support Activity, Table of Distribution and Allowances
Runner Up: 498th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion Supply Point 60, Camp Carroll, Korea
This unit is a role model and has set the standard in warehouse operations. It has consistently exceeded all regulatory requirements and supply performance measures. Its facilities and warehouse layout are organized to maximize work flow. It consistently uses the Army Automated Information Technology systems in day-to-day operations.

79. Army National Guard, Level I, Unit Supply Modified Table of Organization and Equipment Winner: Detachment 2, 165th Quartermaster Company, Seward, Nebraska
This three year old organization has a desire to build a solid foundation by striving for the Supply Excellence Award. The Supply Sergeant is energetic, experienced and raring to go. The evaluators were impressed with her technical competence in all areas. The State of Nebraska has a great Command Supply Discipline Program with involvement from leadership at every level. The Commander, First Lieutenant Navratil, has responsibility for a $1.7 million hand receipt and storage of 769 different parachutes; he understands the importance of property accountability and instills this culture of supply discipline in his unit.

80. Army National Guard, Level I, Unit Supply Modified Table of Organization and Equipment Runner Up: 1473rd Quartermaster Support Company, San Juan, Puerto Rico
This companyAca,!a,,cs mission is to establish and operate one or more Consolidated Supply Support Activities. When asked why they competed for the award, the Commander replied: "it was our superb results during the Command Supply Discipline Evaluation, Physical Security Inspections and Command Maintenance Evaluation and Training that made us compete." During the evaluation, the judges observed the support from the 1473rd chain of command; this validates how important the leadership is to the success of a unit's logistical program.

81. Army National Guard, Level I, Unit Supply Table of Distribution and Allowances Winner: Headquarters Company, 66th Troop Command, Jackson, Mississippi
The 66th Troop Command is the standards bearer for the State of Mississippi. The unit Supply Sergeant, Staff Sergeant Cassandra Ewing, stated that, "competing for this award will speak volumes about the organization, and the Soldiers' expertise, professionalism, dedication to duty and contributions to the Army National Guard." Competing has allowed them to showcase their best practices so others throughout the command can take advantage of their concepts. 66th Troop Command competed last year for the award; one year later, it refined its operations, competed again, and won in its category.

82. Army National Guard, Level I, Unit Supply Table of Distribution and Allowances Runner Up: Headquarters 209th Regional Training Institute, Ashland, Nebraska
Competing for the award is a tradition for the 209th Regional Training Institute; it competed and won its first Supply Excellence Award in 2000. The unit continuously strives for excellence. Noted during the onsite evaluation is its thorough Command Supply Discipline Program and proficiency in performing assigned tasks the right way, the first time. Its level of competitiveness and drive to be the best is outstanding. This unit has won a total of six Supply Excellence Awards competitions.

83. Army National Guard, Level II, Property Book Modified Table of Organization and Equipment Winner: Headquarters 254th Transportation Battalion, West Palm Beach, Florida
This Battalion is unique because it is the only one of its kind in the State of Florida; its dual mission (Federal and State) mandates a high level of logistic readiness. For the past three years each of its subordinate units has been in different cycles of the ARFORGEN model. Chief Warrant Officer Two Poignant states they decided to compete for the Supply Excellence Award to improve the logistical posture of the organization through competitive competition.

84. Army National Guard, Level II, Property Book Modified Table of Organization and Equipment Runner Up: 1486th Transportation Company, Ashland, Ohio
This Company is well organized and very efficient. Staff Sergeant Young is recognized as one of the most diligent and technically knowledgeable supply sergeants within the Organization. This manifests itself during Ohio State sponsored logistics training workshops; the unit's quarterly Unit Status Reporting, and battalion sponsored training events. In 2006 he took ownership of 1486th as the Supply Sergeant and property book custodian, and within one year he had years of backlogged supply transactions completed.

85. Army National Guard, Level II, Property Book Table of Distribution and Allowances
Winner: Joint Forces Headquarters - Maine, Augusta, Maine
JFHQ-Maine made significant progress in streamlining its operations and turning in excess property, which has assisted in posturing Maine among the top 10 states in excess management for the National Guard. During 2010, the unit processed more than 10,000 transactions, and corrected 57 Equipment Control Records errors in the Logistics Information Warehouse.

86. Army National Guard, Level II, Property Book Table of Distribution and Allowances Runner-Up: Joint Forces Headquarters - Florida, St. Augustine, Florida
The Property Book Officer for the unit states: "competing for the Award is a wonderful learning tool for any unit, we competed for the experience." One of the tools for a successful Command Supply Discipline Program is training -- and the unit does this well. Monthly, it conducts training on various areas of logistics; and it holds yearly workshops sponsored by the G4 and J8. This is very important as units are located in multiple areas across Florida.

87. Army National Guard, Level III, Parent Level Modified Table of Organization and Equipment Winner: 110th Multifunctional Medical Battalion, Lincoln, Nebraska
Nebraska Army National Guard nominated, competed, and placed in three categories - no easy feat. Sergeant First Class Whisenhunt, 110th MMB Supply Plans NCO, says four of their six supply personnel had less than two years of experience in their military operational specialty, to facilitate learning they provided bimonthly Staff Assistance Visits and monthly log meetings, focusing on areas noted as deficiencies during the Command Supply Discipline Evaluation. This is in line with the Chief of Staff's Campaign on Property Accountability and undoubtedly made them a winner in their category. Command emphasis on accountability and supply discipline is visible in this organization.

88. Army National Guard, Level III, Parent Level, Modified Table of Organization and Equipment Runner Up: 113th Sustainment Brigade, Greensboro, North Carolina
The 113th SB is aggressive in recruiting and cross leveling personnel who are strong in logistical experience in order to execute its State duty and War time missions. This organization decided that competing in the Awards would allow an outside agency to measure its logistical posture without bias and validate its Command Supply Discipline Program. To encourage and reward outstanding performance, a Supply Award incentive program was instituted. The Soldiers in this organization are innovative and organized.

89. Army National Guard, Level III, Parent Level, Table of Distribution and Allowances
Winner: 721st Troop Command, Milford, Delaware
The challenge of competing against like organizations and the opportunity for an outside organization to review its supply operations are why the 721st competed for the title of "the best of the best". Its command staff is very involved with the units. The Property Book Officer and Senior Logistics Non-Commissioned Officer provide guidance and hands on training during the week and drill weekends. This training paid off when the judges evaluated its subordinate unit, 160th Engineer, in Middletown, Del. Staff Sergeant Grevis' management of the supply room clearly identified it as a winner.

90. Army National Guard, Level IV, Supply Support Activity, Table of Distribution and Allowances Winner: United States Property And Fiscal Office Indiana, Supply Support Activity, Indianapolis, Indiana
Another repeat winner, this unit has taken its lessons learned from previous evaluations and applied them to its daily operations. This unit's training program is the key to its success, all of the Soldiers were extremely knowledgeable and had a vast amount of experience in all areas of warehouse operations. Of note was its hazardous materials section, which was a first class operation. All performance measures including the Location and Inventory Accuracy Rate exceeded the Army Standards.

91. Army National Guard, Level IV, Supply Support Activity, Table of Distribution and Allowances Runner Up: Joint Forces Headquarters - Idaho, Supply Support Activity Boise, Idaho
This unit conducted an outstanding well-rounded training program; this was clearly visible by the versatility of its personnel, who were knowledgeable in all areas of warehouse operations. This entire facility is impeccable, with each section well organized for maximum work flow. All regulatory requirements and supply performance measures meet or exceed Army standards.

92. Army Reserve, Level I, Unit Supply Modified Table of Organization and Equipment Winner: 396th Medical Company, Winston Salem, North Carolina
The Supply Sergeant for 396th Medical Company, says his company is "consistently seeking knowledge and thriving for excellence in all areas of supply and logistics management". This quest for excellence compelled 396th MED Co to compete for the Supply Excellence Award. Under the same leadership, it competed in 2010; and while it did not place in that competition year, this was not a deterrence. The unit refined its Command Supply Discipline Program, followed up with additional supply training in accountability, competed, and won in 2011.

93. Army Reserve, Level I, Unit Supply Table of Distribution and Allowances Winner: Area Maintenance Support Activity 39(G), Topeka, Kansas
This unit competed in 2010. It took a good supply operation, tweaked it, and made it better. This shop manages a vast amount of special tools, sets, kits, and outfits, and with a great tool accountability program, it was able to win in this category.

94. Army Reserve, Level I, Unit Supply Table of Distribution and Allowances Runner Up: Area Maintenance Support Activity 11(G), Lubbock, Texas
AMSA 11 provides organizational unit level and limited direct support maintenance on equipment issued to units in and around its support area. It was nominated to compete for the award because of its efficiency and pride on a daily basis. Its HazMat program, tool room procedures, and comprehensive standard operating procedure stood out during the evaluation.

95. Army Reserve, Level II, Property Book Table of Distribution and Allowances Winner: Headquarters Detachment 1st Mission Support Command, Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico
Readiness is what drove 1st Mission Support Command to compete for the Award. Readiness increased by 95 percent through staff assistance visits to subordinate elements, monthly logistical meetings, logistics senior conferences, Command Supply Discipline Program implementation, and enforcement of logistics policies. Training and establishing a climate of supply discipline paid dividends for the Command as it was selected the winner.

96. Army Reserve, Level II, Property Book Table of Distribution and Allowances Runner Up: Headquarters Detachment 1394th Transportation Brigade, Camp Pendleton, California
HHD 1394th Trans Brigade is very efficient in fielding new equipment, turning in displaced equipment, maintaining accurate records, and transferring equipment as required. As a relatively small brigade with an assigned strength of 332 Soldiers, the responsibility for achieving excellence is no small feat.

97. Army Reserve, Level III, Parent Level, Table of Distribution and Allowances Winner: Medical Readiness And Training Command, San Antonio, Texas
This command leads from the front in training units on supply accountability. Although its units are dispersed in various States, this does not hinder supply training; bi-weekly it interacts with subordinate units to focus on logistical issues, and annually it conducts a workshop with hands on training with the supply systems. Results of the Command Supply Discipline Program inspections are used to tailor training on unit weakness.

98. Army Reserve, Level IV, Supply Support Activity, Modified Table of Organization and Equipment Winner: 1011th Quartermaster Company, Detachment 1, Pittsburg, Kansas
This unit set its goal of winning long before the evaluation was conducted. Setting a timeline for achieving milestones was paramount in reaching the level of excellence necessary to be competitive. It was apparent that time was spent on researching Army doctrine, updating site policies and standard operating procedures; its final products are clear, concise, well written and easily understood by its customer base. In addition all findings from its site evaluations and Command Supply Discipline Program inspections are rectified. As a result, the unit exceeded performance measures while continuing to provide excellent customer supply support.

99. Army Reserve, Level IV, Supply Support Activity, Modified Table of Organization and Equipment Runner Up: 238th Maintenance Company SARSS-1, San Antonio, Texas
This unit credits its outstanding command and supervisor support for achieving the distinction of being runner-up in this category. Management is outstanding. The staff is exceedingly skilled in all Request for Supply and Services functions and warehouse operations and clearly understands its mission. The unit maintained a 100 percent inventory accuracy of stocks awaiting disposition instructions and a 100 percent Location Accuracy rate.

Page last updated Mon May 16th, 2011 at 16:19