FORT IRWIN, Calif. - Four civil stability assessment teams exercised their non-lethal expertise during a training event Nov. 4, as part of the 3rd Cavalry Regiment's rotation to the National Training Center.

The multi-functional teams consisted of Soldiers from Civil Affairs, Tactical Psychological Operations, Unit ministry, and the Judge Advocate General's Corps who were tasked to assess the town of Nabran.

As part of this simulated training, the town was recently liberated by Task Force Rifles and the teams were sent in to conduct an initial assessment. Each squad had to collect specific data to conduct an enemy propaganda analysis, religious impact analysis, determine proper humanitarian aid efforts and develop networks to exploit during future operations.

"A training scenario like this is where you can make mistakes and learn from, so when real world situations occur you can lean on your training and execute accordingly," Staff Sgt. Leo Villarreal, a religious affairs Non-commissioned Officer with the 3rd CR, said.

This specialized training spans over four days and can't be easily replicated because of the austere environment, foreign speaking role players and the complex scenario, that showcases how non-lethal assets bring different capabilities in combat.

"Normally when you think of chaplains, you think of religious services, counseling and strong bond retreats," Maj. Bill Martin the 3rd CR Chaplain, said. "We also bring another capability to the regiment. External advisement, which is being trained on today, provides the commander with information about the religious environment that can affect our mission."

Another non-lethal capability that isn't often highlighted on the battlefield is the legal guidance commanders seek out when faced with challenges in combat.

"Paralegal training at NTC is the best in the world. Nowhere else are paralegals trained on the claims process in combat, rules of law and basic Soldier skills in a dynamic real-world setting as part of a multi-functional civil stability team," Maj Gregory Isham, Regimental Judge Advocate, said.

Readiness and lethality are at the forefront of training, and the Brave Rifles non-lethal forces are trained and ready to provide stability in any complex environment.