LANDSTUHL, Germany - Army Nurse Corps team members and Landstuhl Regional Medical Center staff celebrated the 117th Army Nurse Corps birthday at the center's Heaton Auditorium, Feb. 2.

The event included a presentation on the history of the Army Nurse Corps founded in 1901 and reciting the Army Nursing Team Creed. Retired Brig. Gen. William T. Bester, former Chief of the Army Nurse Corps, spoke about the ANC legacy, his experiences and the lessons learned throughout his career as an ANC officer.

"I think we should be proud of our history," Bester said. "It is a great history. I think it is appropriate that we take time every year to take a breath, slow down, and look back at the great reputation and great legacy that was established by those who preceded us. We should never lose sight of the great impact that each and every one of you have on the Corps today and will have on the Corps in the future."

Nurses who attended the event noted the impact celebrating their heritage and inherited legacy had on them.

"The Army Nurse Corps Birthday is a reminder for me to remember my importance as a Soldier and a nurse in the military," said 1st Lt. Dashekia Adams. "Sometimes as we lose sight of that. It reminds me how important my job is and how important being a nurse and a Soldier together is."

The event closed with a cake cutting ceremony and singing the Army Song.

"As Army nurses, we should always see ourselves as Soldiers first," said Col. Timothy Hudson, LRMC commander. "Then, we should take very seriously our commission, we are officers who lead. We are in two professions, the nursing profession and the profession of arms. Taking your nursing profession seriously without the profession of arms will only make you a good nurse, not necessarily a good Army nurse. Be known in this order: as a Soldier who is an officer with the special skill of a
nurse. Don't get them out of order."

After the ceremony young ANC officers in attendance had the opportunity to mingle with senior and retired ANC officers. Many of the seasoned Army Nurses related their experiences to the young officers.

"My brother was killed in Vietnam in 1965," said retired Lt. Col. Lois Borsay. "It was the worst thing that ever happened to me. Joining the Army gave me the chance to make something good come of that, it gave me the chance to serve my country, which I think everyone should do in some form or another. The Army Nurse Corps Birthday allows us to celebrate the great legacy we have of taking care of soldiers and advocating for our patients."