• Lt. Col. Lisa Mahood accepts a token of appreciation for speaking at the Capital Club townhall meeting in Alexandria, Va., from the Capital Club Chapter President Geoff Leighton, June 15, 2012.

    Lt. Col. Lisa Mahood accepts gift

    Lt. Col. Lisa Mahood accepts a token of appreciation for speaking at the Capital Club townhall meeting in Alexandria, Va., from the Capital Club Chapter President Geoff Leighton, June 15, 2012.

  • Lt. Col. Lisa Mahood updates the Capital Club chapter of the Association of Old Crows on the latest Army electronic warfare programs at the Army Navy Country Club in Alexandria, Va., June 15, 2012.

    Lt. Col. Lisa Mahood speaks to Association of Old Crows

    Lt. Col. Lisa Mahood updates the Capital Club chapter of the Association of Old Crows on the latest Army electronic warfare programs at the Army Navy Country Club in Alexandria, Va., June 15, 2012.

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (June 25, 2012) -- Army Electronic Warfare spectrum operations continue to receive praises from outside organizations such as the Association of Old Crows headquartered in Alexandria Virginia. Recently, Lieutenant Colonel Lisa Mahood of the Headquarters, Department of the Army, or HQDA, Electronic Warfare Division spoke at the Association of Old Crows Capital Club Town Hall meeting at the Army Navy Country Club in Arlington, Virginia on June 15 to a room full of experts in the field of electronic warfare and information operations.

The Association of Old Crows is an electronic warfare and information operations association which promotes electromagnetic spectrum operations and related military, civilian and commercial applications.

Mahood, who came to HQDA from the Vermont Army National Guard, started her remarks by giving a brief overview of the HQDA structure and how the EW division fits into the mold and will merge with the G-39 IO and Cyber operations in the Fall. Currently Mahood serves as the branch chief for EW Programs and Requirements.

Mahood discussed one of the most successful current Army EW programs, Communications Electronic Attack with Surveillance and Reconnaissance, known as the CEASAR program. The CEASAR program is an electronic attack pod that is mounted to an MC-12, which is a twin-engine turboprop aircraft.

"The CEASAR Quick Reaction Capability is the Army's first attempt at Air Electronic Attack. We leveraged heavily on the knowledge, experience and abilities of the Navy with their AEA on the Prowler and Growler airframes," said Mahood. "Of course with a different mission and purpose, the CEASAR QRC was designed to be more suitable for the Army by being an Army controlled, Army manned, precision effects system both in footprint and frequency. It was and is a huge success and will inform the Army's IEWS program."

Future plans for the Army include an Integrated Electronic Warfare Systems, or IEWS. This will include the EW Planning and Management tool, Defensive Electronic Attack systems to replace the current Counter Radio Controlled Improvised Explosive Device Electronic Warfare, or CREW, systems and the Multi Function Electronic Warfare, or MFEW family of systems. MFEW will be the Army's program of record for the war fighter's EW equipment.

The EW school house which currently resides at Fort Sill in Lawton, Oklahoma is an integral piece of EW staying an enduring capability. EW courses are available for officers, warrant officers as well as enlisted Soldiers.

"EW for the Army is an enduring capability and will need continuous personnel fills to be sustained," said Mahood. "Due to the highly technical nature of the job, these people will need to be grown and not just born. So their development is a process and not just an event. And with ever changing technology and [tactics, techniques, and procedures], up to date training will be essential."

The Army EW division is appreciative of the working relationship that it shares with the Association of Old Crows.

"The AOC is a great bunch of folks, who have the background and technically understand the challenges from many viewpoints," Mahood said. "They have been supportive of the Army's venture into EW and we hope to work with them closely in the future."

The AOC worked mainly with the Air Force and the Navy prior to Sept. 11, 2001, but now ground EW has also become a driving force of the organization.

"Before 2001, the primary 'beneficiaries' of EW protection were ships and aircraft (both Air Force and Navy carrier launched craft)," said Paul Vale AOC's Capitol Club flack. "The Global War on Terrorism changed all that. Troops on the ground were targeted by IEDs that were often triggered by cell phones or other devices that could potentially be defeated by EW technologies. The Army was quick to recognize this and AOC Capitol Club members wanted to understand the Army's requirements so that they could bring their resources to bear on providing solutions."

"The Capitol Club invited the Army's EW division to address its Spring Town Hall to further this dialog," Vale continued. "The result was a lively and informative presentation and Q&A at the Army Navy Country Club."

Mahood looks forward to the next AOC Capital Club meeting which will take place on Capitol Hill, June 27, for the Annual EW Congressional breakfast where Members of Congress will speak and update AOC and others in the EW leadership community on the latest initiatives within EW.

"The AOC has done an outstanding job of championing EW for the Navy, USMC, and USAF outside the DOD. We hope that they will take the Army under their wing as well." said Mahood.

Page last updated Wed June 27th, 2012 at 00:00