The Rorschach test is commonly recognized as the inkblot psychological test in which subjects' interpretations of inkblots are used to determine personality traits.

Tripler's Department of Behavioral Health Psychology Specialty Services hosted Dr. Gregory J. Meyer, Professor of Psychology at the University of Toledo, as the distinguished speaker at the Rorschach Performance Assessment System (R-PAS): Introduction and Case Illustrations workshop on Ford Island July 29-30. The Rorschach test is commonly recognized as the inkblot psychological test in which subjects' interpretations of inkblots are used to determine personality traits. The R-PAS is a relatively new system based on the Rorschach test, and was the focus of the workshop.

Meyer is a member of the Development, Programming and Resource team for the R-PAS, served as the Editor of the Journal of Personality Assessment from 2002-13 and has received Distinguished Contribution Awards on multiple occasions from the Society for Personality Assessment. He presented the latest evidence based approach in personality assessments to military and civilian psychologists, residents and interns.

Meyer noted that R-PAS is different from the typical method of Rorschach administration.
According to Meyer, "The Rorschach provides a perceptual and communicative behavioral task that the individual engages in…it allows us to see how someone goes about solving problems", he said. As part of the R-PAS, subjects are examined in a complex environment, under standardized circumstances, which allows researchers to "come back and code and classify behaviors and compare them to normative information". From this point, researchers can "draw inferences about what somebody is like relative to other people through other dimensions -- how conventionally they see things, perceive things and how organized their thought process is", he said.

The R-PAS workshop was held to "bring folks up to speed in terms of the latest evidence based approach to doing personality assessment" Meyer said.

The workshop, which Meyer explained as "reinvigorating performance based assessment", allowed attendees to learn information that will "help us understand people based on what they do, not just in how they describe themselves".

Page last updated Tue August 13th, 2013 at 00:00