Air Force holds training with A-10 aircraft at Fort McCoy
1 / 12 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Air Force pilots guides an A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft over the airspace on South Post at Fort McCoy, Wis., on Oct. 4, 2022, as part of training operations at installation. Several A-10s completed taking off and landing at Young Air Assault Strip on South Post and flying routes over the installation. According to the Air Force fact sheet for the A-10C, the Thunderbolt II is the first Air Force aircraft specially designed for close air support of ground forces. They are simple, effective and survivable twin-engine jet aircraft that can be used against light maritime attack aircraft and all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles. The A-10C offers excellent maneuverability at low airspeeds and altitude while maintaining a highly accurate weapons-delivery platform. They can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time, are capable of austere landings and operate under 1,000-foot ceilings (303.3 meters) with 1.5-mile (2.4 kilometers) visibility. Additionally, with the capability of carrying precision guided munitions and unguided munitions, they can employ above, below and in the weather. A-10C pilots can also conduct their missions during darkness. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL
Air Force holds training with A-10 aircraft at Fort McCoy
2 / 12 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Air Force pilots guides an A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft over the airspace on South Post at Fort McCoy, Wis., on Oct. 4, 2022, as part of training operations at installation. Several A-10s completed taking off and landing at Young Air Assault Strip on South Post and flying routes over the installation. According to the Air Force fact sheet for the A-10C, the Thunderbolt II is the first Air Force aircraft specially designed for close air support of ground forces. They are simple, effective and survivable twin-engine jet aircraft that can be used against light maritime attack aircraft and all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles. The A-10C offers excellent maneuverability at low airspeeds and altitude while maintaining a highly accurate weapons-delivery platform. They can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time, are capable of austere landings and operate under 1,000-foot ceilings (303.3 meters) with 1.5-mile (2.4 kilometers) visibility. Additionally, with the capability of carrying precision guided munitions and unguided munitions, they can employ above, below and in the weather. A-10C pilots can also conduct their missions during darkness. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL
Air Force holds training with A-10 aircraft at Fort McCoy
3 / 12 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Air Force pilots guides an A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft over the airspace on South Post at Fort McCoy, Wis., on Oct. 4, 2022, as part of training operations at installation. Several A-10s completed taking off and landing at Young Air Assault Strip on South Post and flying routes over the installation. According to the Air Force fact sheet for the A-10C, the Thunderbolt II is the first Air Force aircraft specially designed for close air support of ground forces. They are simple, effective and survivable twin-engine jet aircraft that can be used against light maritime attack aircraft and all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles. The A-10C offers excellent maneuverability at low airspeeds and altitude while maintaining a highly accurate weapons-delivery platform. They can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time, are capable of austere landings and operate under 1,000-foot ceilings (303.3 meters) with 1.5-mile (2.4 kilometers) visibility. Additionally, with the capability of carrying precision guided munitions and unguided munitions, they can employ above, below and in the weather. A-10C pilots can also conduct their missions during darkness. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL
Air Force holds training with A-10 aircraft at Fort McCoy
4 / 12 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Air Force pilots guides an A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft over the airspace on South Post at Fort McCoy, Wis., on Oct. 4, 2022, as part of training operations at installation. Several A-10s completed taking off and landing at Young Air Assault Strip on South Post and flying routes over the installation. According to the Air Force fact sheet for the A-10C, the Thunderbolt II is the first Air Force aircraft specially designed for close air support of ground forces. They are simple, effective and survivable twin-engine jet aircraft that can be used against light maritime attack aircraft and all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles. The A-10C offers excellent maneuverability at low airspeeds and altitude while maintaining a highly accurate weapons-delivery platform. They can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time, are capable of austere landings and operate under 1,000-foot ceilings (303.3 meters) with 1.5-mile (2.4 kilometers) visibility. Additionally, with the capability of carrying precision guided munitions and unguided munitions, they can employ above, below and in the weather. A-10C pilots can also conduct their missions during darkness. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL
Air Force holds training with A-10 aircraft at Fort McCoy
5 / 12 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Air Force pilots guides an A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft over the airspace on South Post at Fort McCoy, Wis., on Oct. 4, 2022, as part of training operations at installation. Several A-10s completed taking off and landing at Young Air Assault Strip on South Post and flying routes over the installation. According to the Air Force fact sheet for the A-10C, the Thunderbolt II is the first Air Force aircraft specially designed for close air support of ground forces. They are simple, effective and survivable twin-engine jet aircraft that can be used against light maritime attack aircraft and all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles. The A-10C offers excellent maneuverability at low airspeeds and altitude while maintaining a highly accurate weapons-delivery platform. They can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time, are capable of austere landings and operate under 1,000-foot ceilings (303.3 meters) with 1.5-mile (2.4 kilometers) visibility. Additionally, with the capability of carrying precision guided munitions and unguided munitions, they can employ above, below and in the weather. A-10C pilots can also conduct their missions during darkness. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL
Air Force holds training with A-10 aircraft at Fort McCoy
6 / 12 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Air Force pilots guides an A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft over the airspace on South Post at Fort McCoy, Wis., on Oct. 4, 2022, as part of training operations at installation. Several A-10s completed taking off and landing at Young Air Assault Strip on South Post and flying routes over the installation. According to the Air Force fact sheet for the A-10C, the Thunderbolt II is the first Air Force aircraft specially designed for close air support of ground forces. They are simple, effective and survivable twin-engine jet aircraft that can be used against light maritime attack aircraft and all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles. The A-10C offers excellent maneuverability at low airspeeds and altitude while maintaining a highly accurate weapons-delivery platform. They can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time, are capable of austere landings and operate under 1,000-foot ceilings (303.3 meters) with 1.5-mile (2.4 kilometers) visibility. Additionally, with the capability of carrying precision guided munitions and unguided munitions, they can employ above, below and in the weather. A-10C pilots can also conduct their missions during darkness. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL
Air Force holds training with A-10 aircraft at Fort McCoy
7 / 12 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Air Force pilots guides an A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft over the airspace on South Post at Fort McCoy, Wis., on Oct. 4, 2022, as part of training operations at installation. Several A-10s completed taking off and landing at Young Air Assault Strip on South Post and flying routes over the installation. According to the Air Force fact sheet for the A-10C, the Thunderbolt II is the first Air Force aircraft specially designed for close air support of ground forces. They are simple, effective and survivable twin-engine jet aircraft that can be used against light maritime attack aircraft and all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles. The A-10C offers excellent maneuverability at low airspeeds and altitude while maintaining a highly accurate weapons-delivery platform. They can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time, are capable of austere landings and operate under 1,000-foot ceilings (303.3 meters) with 1.5-mile (2.4 kilometers) visibility. Additionally, with the capability of carrying precision guided munitions and unguided munitions, they can employ above, below and in the weather. A-10C pilots can also conduct their missions during darkness. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL
Air Force holds training with A-10 aircraft at Fort McCoy
8 / 12 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Air Force pilots guides an A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft over the airspace on South Post at Fort McCoy, Wis., on Oct. 4, 2022, as part of training operations at installation. Several A-10s completed taking off and landing at Young Air Assault Strip on South Post and flying routes over the installation. According to the Air Force fact sheet for the A-10C, the Thunderbolt II is the first Air Force aircraft specially designed for close air support of ground forces. They are simple, effective and survivable twin-engine jet aircraft that can be used against light maritime attack aircraft and all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles. The A-10C offers excellent maneuverability at low airspeeds and altitude while maintaining a highly accurate weapons-delivery platform. They can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time, are capable of austere landings and operate under 1,000-foot ceilings (303.3 meters) with 1.5-mile (2.4 kilometers) visibility. Additionally, with the capability of carrying precision guided munitions and unguided munitions, they can employ above, below and in the weather. A-10C pilots can also conduct their missions during darkness. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL
Air Force holds training with A-10 aircraft at Fort McCoy
9 / 12 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Air Force pilots guides an A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft over the airspace on South Post at Fort McCoy, Wis., on Oct. 4, 2022, as part of training operations at installation. Several A-10s completed taking off and landing at Young Air Assault Strip on South Post and flying routes over the installation. According to the Air Force fact sheet for the A-10C, the Thunderbolt II is the first Air Force aircraft specially designed for close air support of ground forces. They are simple, effective and survivable twin-engine jet aircraft that can be used against light maritime attack aircraft and all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles. The A-10C offers excellent maneuverability at low airspeeds and altitude while maintaining a highly accurate weapons-delivery platform. They can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time, are capable of austere landings and operate under 1,000-foot ceilings (303.3 meters) with 1.5-mile (2.4 kilometers) visibility. Additionally, with the capability of carrying precision guided munitions and unguided munitions, they can employ above, below and in the weather. A-10C pilots can also conduct their missions during darkness. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL
Air Force holds training with A-10 aircraft at Fort McCoy
10 / 12 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Air Force pilots guides an A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft over the airspace on South Post at Fort McCoy, Wis., on Oct. 4, 2022, as part of training operations at installation. Several A-10s completed taking off and landing at Young Air Assault Strip on South Post and flying routes over the installation. According to the Air Force fact sheet for the A-10C, the Thunderbolt II is the first Air Force aircraft specially designed for close air support of ground forces. They are simple, effective and survivable twin-engine jet aircraft that can be used against light maritime attack aircraft and all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles. The A-10C offers excellent maneuverability at low airspeeds and altitude while maintaining a highly accurate weapons-delivery platform. They can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time, are capable of austere landings and operate under 1,000-foot ceilings (303.3 meters) with 1.5-mile (2.4 kilometers) visibility. Additionally, with the capability of carrying precision guided munitions and unguided munitions, they can employ above, below and in the weather. A-10C pilots can also conduct their missions during darkness. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL
Air Force holds training with A-10 aircraft at Fort McCoy
11 / 12 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Air Force pilots guides an A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft over the airspace on South Post at Fort McCoy, Wis., on Oct. 4, 2022, as part of training operations at installation. Several A-10s completed taking off and landing at Young Air Assault Strip on South Post and flying routes over the installation. According to the Air Force fact sheet for the A-10C, the Thunderbolt II is the first Air Force aircraft specially designed for close air support of ground forces. They are simple, effective and survivable twin-engine jet aircraft that can be used against light maritime attack aircraft and all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles. The A-10C offers excellent maneuverability at low airspeeds and altitude while maintaining a highly accurate weapons-delivery platform. They can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time, are capable of austere landings and operate under 1,000-foot ceilings (303.3 meters) with 1.5-mile (2.4 kilometers) visibility. Additionally, with the capability of carrying precision guided munitions and unguided munitions, they can employ above, below and in the weather. A-10C pilots can also conduct their missions during darkness. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL
Air Force holds training with A-10 aircraft at Fort McCoy
12 / 12 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Air Force pilots guides an A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft over the airspace on South Post at Fort McCoy, Wis., on Oct. 4, 2022, as part of training operations at installation. Several A-10s completed taking off and landing at Young Air Assault Strip on South Post and flying routes over the installation. According to the Air Force fact sheet for the A-10C, the Thunderbolt II is the first Air Force aircraft specially designed for close air support of ground forces. They are simple, effective and survivable twin-engine jet aircraft that can be used against light maritime attack aircraft and all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles. The A-10C offers excellent maneuverability at low airspeeds and altitude while maintaining a highly accurate weapons-delivery platform. They can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time, are capable of austere landings and operate under 1,000-foot ceilings (303.3 meters) with 1.5-mile (2.4 kilometers) visibility. Additionally, with the capability of carrying precision guided munitions and unguided munitions, they can employ above, below and in the weather. A-10C pilots can also conduct their missions during darkness. (U.S. Army Photo by Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office, Fort McCoy, Wis.) (Photo Credit: Scott Sturkol) VIEW ORIGINAL

An Air Force pilot guides an A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft over the airspace on South Post at Fort McCoy, Wis., on Oct. 4, 2022, as part of training operations at installation.

Several A-10s completed taking off and landing at Young Air Assault Strip on South Post and flying routes over the installation.

According to the Air Force fact sheet for the A-10C, the Thunderbolt II is the first Air Force aircraft specially designed for close air support of ground forces.

They are simple, effective and survivable twin-engine jet aircraft that can be used against light maritime attack aircraft and all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles.

The A-10C offers excellent maneuverability at low airspeeds and altitude while maintaining a highly accurate weapons-delivery platform. They can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time, are capable of austere landings and operate under 1,000-foot ceilings (303.3 meters) with 1.5-mile (2.4 kilometers) visibility.

Additionally, with the capability of carrying precision guided munitions and unguided munitions, they can employ above, below and in the weather. A-10C pilots can also conduct their missions during darkness.

Fort McCoy’s motto is to be the “Total Force Training Center.” Located in the heart of the upper Midwest, Fort McCoy is the only U.S. Army installation in Wisconsin.

The installation has provided support and facilities for the field and classroom training of more than 100,000 military personnel from all services nearly every year since 1984.

Learn more about Fort McCoy online at https://home.army.mil/mccoy, on the Defense Visual Information Distribution System at https://www.dvidshub.net/fmpao, on Facebook by searching “ftmccoy,” and on Twitter by searching “usagmccoy.”

Also try downloading the Digital Garrison app to your smartphone and set “Fort McCoy” or another installation as your preferred base.