Gold Star Family members release butterflies ahead of Memorial Day
1 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A Soldier attending the annual Butterfly Release Ceremony at Fort Lee, Va., salutes the U.S. flag as the inspirational notes of national anthem waft over the installation’s Memorial Garden, adorned with photos of fallen service members. The Butterfly Release is a pre-Memorial Day celebration of life and afterlife, honoring those who died while serving in the U.S. military. (U.S. Army photo by Chad Menegay) (Photo Credit: Chad Menegay) VIEW ORIGINAL
Gold Star Family members release butterflies ahead of Memorial Day
2 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Gold Star Family member Michael Moody Sr. – father of Army Staff Sgt. Michael D. Moody Jr., who died June 23, 2007, while deployed for Operation Iraqi Freedom – releases a painted lady butterfly from an origami-folded envelope May 25 at Fort Lee’s Memorial Garden. The Butterfly Release is an annual pre-Memorial Day celebration of life and afterlife. The Moody family's son was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, Ga. He died in Baghdad of wounds sustained when insurgents using an improvised explosive device and small-arms fire attacked his unit. (U.S. Army photo by Chad Menegay) (Photo Credit: Chad Menegay) VIEW ORIGINAL
Gold Star Family members release butterflies ahead of Memorial Day
3 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A Gold Star Family member releases a painted lady butterfly during a May 25 commemoration ceremony held at Fort Lee’s Memorial Garden. The Butterfly Release, conducted annually just ahead of Memorial Day, honors fallen loved ones who sacrificed their lives while serving in the U.S. military. More than 50 Gold Star Family members attended the emotional Survivor Outreach Services-hosted event. (U.S. Army photo by Chad Menegay) (Photo Credit: Chad Menegay) VIEW ORIGINAL
Gold Star Family members release butterflies ahead of Memorial Day
4 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – About 50 surviving family members stand in a circle during an emotional Butterfly Release observance May 25 at a dedicated Memorial Garden on Fort Lee, Virginia. Also in attendance were several base leaders, service members, civilian staff and community supporters. (U.S. Army photo by Chad Menegay) (Photo Credit: Chad Menegay) VIEW ORIGINAL
Gold Star Family members release butterflies ahead of Memorial Day
5 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Gold Star Family members stand around a large, sculptured water fountain prior to the start of a May 25 Butterfly Release ceremony at Fort Lee’s Memorial Garden. The observance, held annually just ahead of Memorial Day, provides an opportunity for them to honor fallen loved ones who sacrificed their lives while serving in the U.S. military. More than 50 Gold Star Family members attended the event. (U.S. Army photo by Chad Menegay) (Photo Credit: Chad Menegay) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT LEE, Va. – As a symbol of transfiguration and hope, the graceful and elegantly winged butterfly is a living metaphor of renewal and resurrection by which the soul transcends the physical world.

With that existential thought in mind, the Survivor Outreach Services office here conducted its latest annual observance in which Gold Star Family members released live painted lady butterflies in tribute to their fallen loved ones.

The Butterfly Release took place May 25 at the Fort Lee Memorial Garden as a pre-Memorial Day celebration of life and afterlife amid both tears and laughter.

“This is a special observance to honor and remember our military men and women who made a sacrifice to this nation,” announced Fort Lee Garrison Commander Col. Karin L. Watson in opening remarks. “As Memorial Day approaches, we look to honor those who died while serving our country, and we offer our heartfelt support to every survivor.”

The annual Butterfly Release is also a public show of respect and gratitude to the immediate spouses, children, mothers, fathers or siblings of a fallen service member who died while serving his or her country in uniform.

“While everyone else is having their barbecues and family gatherings all in the name of having a holiday off, just remember what Memorial Day is truly about,” said Marion Tate, the widow of Staff Sgt. Sheldon Tate who was killed in action on July 13, 2010, during an insurgent attack on an Afghan police compound in Kandahar City. “We know many don’t get it, but we will always have each other and our families to celebrate their lives.”

About 50 surviving family members attended this year’s emotional observance. During the ceremony, they took turns stepping up to the mic to speak the names of their deceased loved ones. Several base leaders, service members, civilian staff and community supporters respectfully observed the proceedings.

“I am reminded of the Wreaths Across America quote that says, ‘A person dies twice: once when they take their final breath, and later, the last time their name is spoken,’” Watson reflected. “That’s why this event is so important. It allows our community to see faces and hear each name of those who have given so much to our country.”

The Memorial Garden showcased portraits of the fallen service members, flanked by meticulously aligned rows of U.S. flags, and Gold Star Family members standing in a circle around a large, sculptured water fountain. Individual survivors released the orange and black colored butterflies into a crisp, 60-degree Fahrenheit sky, with many butterflies holding on to the fingers of survivors for several minutes before flying off onto nearby trees and flowers.

Survivor Outreach Services regularly emphasizes to the family members of the fallen that they will remain continually linked to the Army community for as long as they desire.