Soldiers perform the play Second Chance at Camp Henry in front of an audience of their peers on Sept 28th. The performance was in support of suicide prevention.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers perform the play Second Chance at Camp Henry in front of an audience of their peers on Sept 28th. The performance was in support of suicide prevention. (Photo Credit: Mat Gleeson) VIEW ORIGINAL
Soldiers perform the play Second Chance at the Camp Henry Theater on Sept. 28th. The all-volunteer cast comes from units across Korea. This was their 18th performance.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers perform the play Second Chance at the Camp Henry Theater on Sept. 28th. The all-volunteer cast comes from units across Korea. This was their 18th performance. (Photo Credit: Mat Gleeson) VIEW ORIGINAL

CAMP HENRY, Republic of South Korea —USAG Daegu hosted a live performance of the suicide prevention play Second Chance September 28th at the Camp Henry Theater.

The performance was as much a theatrical production as it was a training event—with a cast consisting entirely of active duty Soldiers.

“In my experience nobody can tell a Soldier’s story better than the Soldier who lives that life every day. Soldiers training Soldiers is huge, because the audience can relate to the cast,” said play director Russell Jordan.

"Nobody can tell a Soldier’s story better than the Soldier who lives that life every day. Soldiers training Soldiers is huge, because the audience can relate to the cast"

The play tells the story of Spec. Jones, a young Soldier who struggles with depression after making several mistakes.

“The play’s relatable,” said lead performer Capt. Anthony King, who is assigned to 70th Brigade Support Battalion, 210th Field Artillery Brigade.

“I think this play gives us the opportunity to show some of the warning signs. Hopefully it can empower you to be more attentive and take action to prevent [suicide].”

King hopes all members of the audience take away the same message.

“Be the change. A lot of times you’re expecting someone else to do it, but we all have a role to play. We’re all family. We’re all a community. If you do your part and the next person does their part, we’ll tackle this thing together.”

September is Suicide Prevention Month and this year’s theme is “Connect to Protect — Support is Within Reach.” Join us as the US Army works to increase awareness of the warning signs of those at risk and enhance understanding of the characteristics of suicidal ideation & coping mechanisms.

Look after your fellow Soldiers and spread the word about key resources such as the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline which can be reached by Calling 1-800-273-TALK (8255)