A 32d Air and Missile Defense Command forward observer observes a simulated artillery strike during call for fire training August 12, at the Division Artillery building on Fort Bliss. The training made use of the Call For Fire Trainer Immersive System, a computer system that allows fire support teams to simulate field artillery engagements in a safe, controlled environment. (US Army photo by Sgt. Ian Vega-Cerezo, 32d AAMDC Public Affairs)
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A 32d Air and Missile Defense Command forward observer observes a simulated artillery strike during call for fire training August 12, at the Division Artillery building on Fort Bliss. The training made use of the Call For Fire Trainer Immersive System, a computer system that allows fire support teams to simulate field artillery engagements in a safe, controlled environment. (US Army photo by Sgt. Ian Vega-Cerezo, 32d AAMDC Public Affairs) (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ian Vega-Cerezo) VIEW ORIGINAL
Pfc. Santana draws a terrain sketch during call for fire training August 12, at the Division Artillery building on Fort Bliss. The training made use of the Call For Fire Trainer Immersive System, a computer system that allows fire support teams to simulate field artillery engagements in a safe, controlled environment. (US Army photo by Sgt. Ian Vega-Cerezo, 32d AAMDC Public Affairs)
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Pfc. Santana draws a terrain sketch during call for fire training August 12, at the Division Artillery building on Fort Bliss. The training made use of the Call For Fire Trainer Immersive System, a computer system that allows fire support teams to simulate field artillery engagements in a safe, controlled environment. (US Army photo by Sgt. Ian Vega-Cerezo, 32d AAMDC Public Affairs) (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ian Vega-Cerezo) VIEW ORIGINAL
Spc. Roth guides his Soldiers through target plotting during call for fire training August 12, at the Division Artillery building on Fort Bliss. The training made use of the Call For Fire Trainer Immersive System, a computer system that allows fire support teams to simulate field artillery engagements in a safe, controlled environment. (US Army photo by Sgt. Ian Vega-Cerezo, 32d AAMDC Public Affairs)
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Spc. Roth guides his Soldiers through target plotting during call for fire training August 12, at the Division Artillery building on Fort Bliss. The training made use of the Call For Fire Trainer Immersive System, a computer system that allows fire support teams to simulate field artillery engagements in a safe, controlled environment. (US Army photo by Sgt. Ian Vega-Cerezo, 32d AAMDC Public Affairs) (Photo Credit: Sgt. Ian Vega-Cerezo) VIEW ORIGINAL

Forward observers from the 32d Air and Missile Defense Command’s targeting section conducted call-for-fire training, August 12, at the Division Artillery building on Fort Bliss.

The training made use of the Call For Fire Trainer Immersive System, a computer system that allows fire support teams to simulate field artillery engagements in a safe, controlled environment.

“This simulates going to the actual observation post and calling for fire, instead of wasting resources that the other field artillery units have,” said Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Philippi, G3 targeting NCOIC, 32d AAMDC. “We can come into a safe environment and practice on basic call-for-fire skills with unlimited rounds and while mitigating the risk of injury.”

Despite 32d’s primary mission focus on air defense artillery, the inclusion of indirect fires capabilities gives 32d the ability to coordinate and communicate with non-organic field artillery and air assets to support and defend 32d AAMDC forces while forward deployed.

“As platoon forward observers, these Soldiers’ jobs primarily are to be the eyes and ears of the maneuver force on the battlefield,” said Maj. Rafael Chico-Lugo, chief of targeting, 32d AAMDC. “They also coordinate indirect fire onto enemy forces to ensure that their maneuver platoon can close with and destroy the enemy.”

Refining basic job skills is just the first of many steps for ensuring the fire support team’s ability to meet the challenges of an ever changing battlefield that requires the ability to adapt to new threats on the fly and rapidly establish tactical dominance.