Reyne Husky provides women’s health information during a Breast Cancer Awareness event at Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, May 7, 2021. Husky was able to discover her own breast cancer after attending a similar event. (U.S. Army photo by Jason W. Edwards)
Reyne Husky provides women’s health information during a Breast Cancer Awareness event at Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, May 7, 2021. Husky was able to discover her own breast cancer after attending a similar event. (U.S. Army photo by Jason W. Edwards) (Photo Credit: Jason W. Edwards) VIEW ORIGINAL

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas (May 12, 2021) -- Brooke Army Medical Center partnered with University Health System to offer mammograms to BAMC civilian and contract employees May 7.

Additionally, a breast health information booth was available to those walking through the Medical Mall and walk-in mammogram services were available to TRICARE beneficiaries in the Mammography Clinic.

The annual event, usually held in October for Breast Cancer Awareness Month, had to be rescheduled because of COVID-19.

“The goal of this event is to increase breast health awareness, promote early detection through education and improve access to care,” said Bianca Rodriguez, BAMC breast nurse navigator. “We rescheduled the event right before Mother’s Day in efforts to remind people to care for their lady loved ones by encouraging and supporting them to schedule a mammogram.”

During the event, UHS performed 28 screening mammograms in their mobile mammogram bus and the Mammography Clinic saw 39 patients.

The event was so successful, UHS added an additional date to see more patients.

The American Cancer Society estimates there will be about 281,550 new cases of invasive breast cancer diagnosed in women in 2021, and about 43,600 women will die from breast cancer this year alone.

Breast cancer is sometimes found after symptoms appear, but many women with breast cancer have no symptoms. That’s why regular breast cancer screening is so important. For more information about screening guidelines, visit https://www.cancer.org/healthy/find-cancer-early/american-cancer-society-guidelines-for-the-early-detection-of-cancer.html#.

Reyne Husky knows firsthand the importance of screening mammograms. She was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2009.

“I noticed a lump after doing a self-examination on my breast,” Husky said. “The cancer was detected after I had a mammogram and biopsy on my left breast at Tripler Army Medical Center in Hawaii. Without early detection, it could have been deadly.”

After coming to San Antonio, Husky joined the Life After Cancer Education (LACE) group at BAMC.

“Being a cancer survivor, I attended one of their meetings and I loved it!” she said. “It was very inspirational. Bianca facilitated the meeting, and I left there inspired to do better. Little did I know that I would soon be on my second journey with breast cancer.”

In October 2019, Husky happened to be at BAMC during the annual breast cancer awareness event. She stopped by the information table to visit.

“Bianca and Darby Stacey who are part of the LACE group, were passing out breast cancer awareness brochures,” she said. “Darby walked with me to the Mammography Clinic where I scheduled an appointment.”

Husky is thankful that her friends encouraged her to get her mammogram that day.

“I had no intentions of receiving a mammogram at that time,” she said. “That is how the cancer on my right breast was discovered.”

Currently, Husky has almost completed her treatment course and is looking forward to a cancer-free future. She wants to continue to volunteer in the LACE program and promote breast cancer awareness.

“The breast cancer awareness program at BAMC is key in early detection,” Husky said. “This program has a profound impact on cancer patients, survivors and family members.”