JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas (Oct. 18, 2018) -- Full performance of a base operations contract pilot now underway at Fort Belvoir, Virginia, marks another step forward in standardizing acquisitions for similar services by Mission and Installation Contracting Command acquisition officials.

Awarded in September, the contract entails facilities maintenance, grounds maintenance, pavement clearance, heating and cooling services, and unaccompanied furnishings management for which multiple operational and project work task orders have already been placed for repairs.

Officials from Fort Belvoir, the MICC headquarters and Installation Management Command teamed with industry representatives approximately a year ago to seek input in developing a standardized performance work statement and evaluation criteria intended to serve as a template for contracting base operations enterprise wide. Daniel Quinn, the MICC-Fort Belvoir contracting officer who led the effort, emphasized the value of engaging industry in this process.

"Multiple draft versions of the performance work statement were posted to Federal Business Opportunities website in order to gain insight and recommendations from industry. This helped the (directorate of public works) customer and Army in better identifying areas of the PWS that needed to be revised," Quinn said. "In addition, over time for industry this will reduce bid and proposal costs for contractors using a standardized approach across IMCOM enterprise."

Quinn worked closely with Raul Guerra and Wiley Cox from the MICC headquarters at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, and James Eaton and Lauren Biddle from the U.S. Army Garrison DPW. The initial industry engagement was followed by a site visit in May 2018 after which the team next devoted its efforts to answering 250 questions submitted by industry representatives to fine tune the request for proposal.

A single fixed-priced, indefinite delivery-indefinite quantity contract with a five-year ordering period was awarded to Aleut O&M Services. The contract is valued at more than $109 million for the first year and includes four option years.

"Base operation services contracts represent one of the largest categories of spend within MICC. By changing from a cost type contract to a fixed price, the team successfully transferred much of the performance cost risk from the government to the contractor," said Guerra, who led the cost price analysis for the acquisition. "The tiered pricing structure also allows for adjusting the services level to the desired capability level depending on available funding and the competitive pricing established at contract award."

While the requirements outlined in the contract are not dissimilar to other base operations contracts executed by the command, the standardized approach taken lends much greater applicability for use at other installations supported by the MICC while saving time and manpower. Quinn said this approach establishes a common level of service across IMCOM.

"The pre-priced capability performance levels alleviates the cost growth garrisons experience over the life of the contract when workload fluctuates," he added. "Also, this approach holds contractor accountable for performance through automatic payment deducts when the contractor fails to meet acceptable quality levels as defined in the PWS."

The MICC took the same standardized approach to contracting food services last year at Fort Lee, Virginia. Quinn credited the standardized approach for reducing the procurement acquisition lead time, or PALT, which is a key measure of time between the initiation of an acquisition and delivery of goods or services. In the case of the base operations contract at Fort Belvoir, the PALT was reduced dramatically from an average 405 days to 127 days. The solicitation was issued May 2, and the contract was awarded Sept. 7.

"The result of the pilot program have exceeded all expectations beginning with a record-breaking procurement lead time of 127 days from solicitation release to contract award," Guerra said. "Additionally, a vast improvement in services was contracted by increasing the number support employees by more than 30 percent and ensuring the quality of services by implementing a manageable quality assurance program."

Guerra added the team's achievement of collaborating with IMCOM in developing the standardized PWS will allow MICC to implement the same strategy and deliver improved acquisition lead times and similar benefits throughout the enterprise for Army commands and activities supported by the command.

Fort Belvoir is responsible for providing logistical, intelligence and administrative support to a variety commands, activities and agencies. Approximately 45,000 military, government civilian and contractors work on the installation, with another 7,000 residing on post. The contract supports the installation's DPW in performing services on facilities, structures and grounds, consisting of about 9,000 acres and 396 buildings.


About the MICC:
Headquartered at JBSA-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, the Mission and Installation Contracting Command consists of about 1,500 military and civilian members who are responsible for contracting goods and services in support of Soldiers as well as readying trained contracting units for the operating force and contingency environment when called upon. MICC contracts are vital in feeding more than 200,000 Soldiers every day, providing many daily base operations support services at installations, facilitate training in the preparation of more than 100,000 conventional force members annually, training more than 500,000 students each year, and maintaining more than 14.4 million acres of land and 170,000 structures.