• The identification tags on the Fallen Warrior Memorial represent the 199 sustainment Soldiers who made the ultimate sacrifice supporting operations Iraqi Freedom and New Dawn. The tags are hung across a rifle, which is a component of the memorial that is on display at the Army Logistics University. The cast bronze memorial was presented to the U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command during a ceremony March 15 at ALU on Fort Lee, Va. Presented by Brig. Gen. Don S. Cornett Jr., commanding general, 310th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), the memorial was created by the 3rd Corps Support Command during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Since then, each successive command maintained the memorial as they served in Balad, Iraq. (Photo by Jamie Carson, CASCOM Public Affairs Office)

    The identification tags on the Fallen Warrior...

    The identification tags on the Fallen Warrior Memorial represent the 199 sustainment Soldiers who made the ultimate sacrifice supporting operations Iraqi Freedom and New Dawn. The tags are hung across a rifle, which is a component of the memorial that...

  • Col. Stephen E. Farmen, Chief of Transportation and commandant of the U.S. Army Transportation School, speaks about the contributions of sustainment Soldiers during a Fallen Warrior Memorial ceremony March 15 at the Army Logistics University on Fort Lee. The cast bronze memorial honoring sustainment Soldiers, who have made the ultimate sacrifice supporting operations Iraqi Freedom and New Dawn, was presented by Brig. Gen. Don S. Cornett Jr., commanding general, 310th Expeditionary Sustainment Command. The memorial includes several components, such as the sculpture of a helmet, rifle and combat boots, which rests on top of a tiered wood base. A cased American flag and plaque are at the front of the memorial, and 199 carefully hung identification tags are draped across the rifle. (Photo by Jamie Carson, CASCOM Public Affairs Office)

    Col. Stephen E. Farmen, Chief of Transportation...

    Col. Stephen E. Farmen, Chief of Transportation and commandant of the U.S. Army Transportation School, speaks about the contributions of sustainment Soldiers during a Fallen Warrior Memorial ceremony March 15 at the Army Logistics University on Fort...

  • Maj. Gen. James L. Hodge, U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command commanding general, renders honors to fallen sustainment Soldiers following a memorial dedication ceremony at the Army Logistics University on Fort Lee March 15. The cast bronze memorial honoring sustainment Soldiers, who have made the ultimate sacrifice supporting operations Iraqi Freedom and New Dawn, was presented by Brig. Gen. Don S. Cornett Jr., 310th Expeditionary Sustainment Command commanding general. The memorial was created by the 3rd Corps Support Command during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Since then, each successive command maintained the memorial as they served in Balad, Iraq. The memorial will now be on permanent display at ALU. The memorial includes several components such as the sculpture of a helmet, rifle and combat boots, which rests on top of a tiered wood base. A cased American flag and plaque are at the front of the memorial, and 199 carefully hung identification tags are draped across the rifle. (Photo by Jamie Carson, CASCOM Public Affairs Office)

    Maj. Gen. James L. Hodge, U.S. Army Combined...

    Maj. Gen. James L. Hodge, U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command commanding general, renders honors to fallen sustainment Soldiers following a memorial dedication ceremony at the Army Logistics University on Fort Lee March 15. The cast bronze memorial...

FORT LEE, Va. -- A memorial honoring sustainment Soldiers, who made the ultimate sacrifice supporting operations Iraqi Freedom and New Dawn, was presented to the Combined Arms Support Command in a ceremony March 15 at the Army Logistics University.

The cast bronze memorial was presented by the 310th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) to serve as a lasting reminder of selfless service and dedication to duty for all those who attend educational training programs at the university.

The memorial may be simple in design but it is significant in purpose, said Brig. Gen. Don S. Cornett Jr., 310th ESC commanding general. It was created in 2003 by the 3rd Corps Support Command during Operation Iraqi Freedom to honor fallen sustainment Soldiers. Since that time, a total of 10 COSCOMs/ESCs have maintained the memorial while they served in Balad, Iraq.

The design includes several components such as the sculpture of a helmet, rifle and combat boots, which sits on top of a tiered wood base. A cased American flag and plaque are at the front of the memorial, and 199 carefully hung identification tags are draped across the rifle. Each component of the memorial has a meaning - the helmet and identification tags signify the fallen Soldier. The inverted rifle with bayonet signals a time for prayer and a break in the action to pay tribute to the dead. And, the combat boots represent the final march of the last battle.

"This memorial was erected and designed to enshrine the warfighting spirit that is embodied in all our Soldiers, and to ensure it endures into the future," said Col. Stephen E. Farmen, Chief of Transportation and commandant of the U.S. Army Transportation School. Farmen spoke at the ceremony as many of the fallen warriors were Transportation Corps Soldiers "running convoys outside the wire and connecting the distribution fight."

During the ceremony, a video tribute honoring all the warriors on the memorial played in the background. It showcased a photo and information about each Soldier.

Cornett said it was important to remember that the names only represent fallen logisticians in COSCOMs/ESCs in theater and "each one of these Soldiers is a great American."

As the 310th ESC was the last one in theater, how to ensure the memorial remained a lasting tribute became a critical mission. "It seemed like the right thing to do was to make it an ongoing and continuous memorial," he said, as he expressed happiness at having it displayed in a permanent exhibit at the university where all sustainment leaders -- noncommissioned officers, officers and warrant officers -- engage in training and leader development courses.

Its journey to Fort Lee began months ago as it traveled from Balad, through Kuwait and Germany, en route to Dover, Del. Once at Dover, Fort Lee personnel transported it to its temporary housing area in the U.S. Army Quartermaster Museum, where it remained on display until it could be moved to its permanent home at the university.

In speaking about the movement of the memorial, Farmen said its journey was "a true indicator of the level of commitment of our entire Army team. It preserves our ability to pay tribute to our heroes, respect our lineage and history, and never forget the price of freedom that defines our nation."

Farmen accepted the memorial on behalf of all sustainment Soldiers. "As members of our sustainment community pass by this memorial -- it will serve as a pertinent reminder of the steadfast commitment we have in our hearts to never forget our fallen Soldiers; and the bravery it takes to walk undaunted into harms way.

"We pay tribute to them, by immortalizing their spirits, and those of their fellow logistics warriors, who forged into harms way with them…from that fateful day on 9-11 to now, and beyond," Farmen said. "It is essential that we use this moment, and this memorial, to draw strength and inspiration from the courage and selflessness of those that came before us, and continue to find the will, strength of character, and purpose to persevere and fight on until the mission is done."

Page last updated Fri March 16th, 2012 at 14:18