Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center strengthens Indo-Pacific partnerships

By Christopher Hurd, Army News ServiceAugust 18, 2023

Soldiers from Delta Company, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, hone their skills through battle drills before the start of their Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center rotation in Townsville Field Training Area, Australia, July 21, 2023. 

Talisman Sabre is the largest bilateral military exercise between Australia and the United States advancing a free and open Indo-Pacific by strengthening relationships and interoperability among key Allies and enhancing our collective capabilities to respond to a wide array of potential security concerns.
1 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from Delta Company, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, hone their skills through battle drills before the start of their Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center rotation in Townsville Field Training Area, Australia, July 21, 2023.

Talisman Sabre is the largest bilateral military exercise between Australia and the United States advancing a free and open Indo-Pacific by strengthening relationships and interoperability among key Allies and enhancing our collective capabilities to respond to a wide array of potential security concerns. (Photo Credit: US Army photo by Capt. Stacey Lasay)
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U.S. and Indonesian Army Soldiers conduct movement back to their main battle position during the Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center (JPMRC) rotation at Townsville Field Training Area (TFTA), Townsville, Australia, July 23, 2023. 

Talisman Sabre is the largest bilateral military exercise between Australia and the United States advancing a free and open Indo-Pacific by strengthening relationships and interoperability among key Allies and enhancing our collective capabilities to respond to a wide array of potential security concerns.
2 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – U.S. and Indonesian Army Soldiers conduct movement back to their main battle position during the Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center (JPMRC) rotation at Townsville Field Training Area (TFTA), Townsville, Australia, July 23, 2023.

Talisman Sabre is the largest bilateral military exercise between Australia and the United States advancing a free and open Indo-Pacific by strengthening relationships and interoperability among key Allies and enhancing our collective capabilities to respond to a wide array of potential security concerns.

(Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. Kevin Reece)
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Soldiers assigned to 25th Infantry Division practice offloading from a helicopter as part of Talisman Sabre 23, at Townsville Field Training Area approximately one hour west of Townsville, Queensland, Australia, July 23, 2023. The United States, Australia and other ally and partner forces use this exercise to enhance interoperability by training in complex, multi-domain warfare scenarios that replicate current and potential future global security challenges. The exercise is a major undertaking for all participating nations and reflects the strength and priority of alliances, strategic partnerships and ongoing military-military relationships.
3 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers assigned to 25th Infantry Division practice offloading from a helicopter as part of Talisman Sabre 23, at Townsville Field Training Area approximately one hour west of Townsville, Queensland, Australia, July 23, 2023. The United States, Australia and other ally and partner forces use this exercise to enhance interoperability by training in complex, multi-domain warfare scenarios that replicate current and potential future global security challenges. The exercise is a major undertaking for all participating nations and reflects the strength and priority of alliances, strategic partnerships and ongoing military-military relationships. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. Richard Carlisi) VIEW ORIGINAL
An Australian tank conducts field maneuvers as part of Talisman Sabre 23, at Townsville Field Training Area approximately one hour west of Townsville, Queensland, Australia, July 23, 2023. The United States, Australia and other ally and partner forces use this exercise to enhance interoperability by training in complex, multi-domain warfare scenarios that replicate current and potential future global security challenges. The exercise is a major undertaking for all participating nations and reflects the strength and priority of alliances, strategic partnerships and ongoing military-military relationships.
4 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Australian tank conducts field maneuvers as part of Talisman Sabre 23, at Townsville Field Training Area approximately one hour west of Townsville, Queensland, Australia, July 23, 2023. The United States, Australia and other ally and partner forces use this exercise to enhance interoperability by training in complex, multi-domain warfare scenarios that replicate current and potential future global security challenges. The exercise is a major undertaking for all participating nations and reflects the strength and priority of alliances, strategic partnerships and ongoing military-military relationships. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. Richard Carlisi) VIEW ORIGINAL

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Army combined the Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center with the Australian Combat Training Centre for a one-of-a-kind collaboration during Talisman Sabre 23 in Townsville, Australia earlier this month.

The merged training center, led by Australia, tested nearly 10,000 troops from multiple partner nations during a 10-day field training exercise.

"Big exercises like this are where we can induce the fog and friction of stress,” said U.S. Army Col. Bryan Martin, Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center operations group commander. “[They are] the closest we can get to actual real combat on our respective combined forces, so that when that day comes, that they're trained and they're ready."

The scenario called for the joint force to protect a chain of islands from an invading large hostile nation.

The enemy force, which was made up of service members from the participating countries, was given tasks and could make decisions to achieve their mission.

This allowed commanders to train their forces in a scenario and environment that could be encountered in the Pacific.

"This activity that's occurring here is just the richest, most immersive and most realistic, no-consequence training environment that we can possibly create," said Australian Army Col. Ben McLennan, Australian Defence Force's Combat Training Centre commander.

This was the first time the U.S. Army merged combat training centers with a partner nation.

Soldiers from the 25th Infantry Division combined with service members from Germany, Indonesia and Australia to form a task force under Australian command to expel the enemy force.

An Army CH-47 Chinook with an underslung M777 Howitzer from 4th Regiment, Royal Australian Artillery, during Exercise Talisman Sabre 2023 at Shoalwater Bay Training Area, Queensland.
1 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Army CH-47 Chinook with an underslung M777 Howitzer from 4th Regiment, Royal Australian Artillery, during Exercise Talisman Sabre 2023 at Shoalwater Bay Training Area, Queensland. (Photo Credit: Courtesy photo Cpl. Jacob Joseph) VIEW ORIGINAL
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U.S. Army Lt. Col. Patrick Yun briefs scheme of maneuver while participating in a Rehearsal of Concept drill with multilateral military partners from Germany and the USA during Exercise Talisman Sabre 2023 at Townsville Field Training Area, Queensland.
3 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – U.S. Army Lt. Col. Patrick Yun briefs scheme of maneuver while participating in a Rehearsal of Concept drill with multilateral military partners from Germany and the USA during Exercise Talisman Sabre 2023 at Townsville Field Training Area, Queensland. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. Mariah Aguilar) VIEW ORIGINAL
Indonesian National Armed Forces and Australian Amphibious Force Ground Combat Element soldiers from 1st Battalion, the Royal Australian Regiment, disembark an LHD Landing Craft to secure a beach during a Wet and Dry Environmental Rehearsal serial, during Exercise Talisman Sabre 23.
4 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Indonesian National Armed Forces and Australian Amphibious Force Ground Combat Element soldiers from 1st Battalion, the Royal Australian Regiment, disembark an LHD Landing Craft to secure a beach during a Wet and Dry Environmental Rehearsal serial, during Exercise Talisman Sabre 23. (Photo Credit: Courtesy photo by Emma Schwenke) VIEW ORIGINAL

During the training, there was also a virtual portion. This allowed commanders to handle simulated battles, as well as having to deal with electronic warfare and cyberattacks.

“The Australian Army hasn’t participated in something of this magnitude since 1918,” McLennan said. “It’s energizing to be involved in an enterprise enabling the best of our teams to reach their highest performing potential.”

This was the third and final training rotation of the year for the JPMRC.

JPMRC was established nearly three years ago to provide realistic training opportunities for U.S. service members and partner nations in the Indo-Pacific. It’s the first new combat training center outside the continental U.S. in 50 years.

The center executes three training rotations annually, one in the terrains of the Hawaiian Islands, one in Alaska’s extremely cold weather, and one at a satellite location of an allied or partner nation in the region, such as Australia.

The rotations are run by the 196th Infantry Brigade, the training support brigade in the Indo-Pacific, with support from the 25th Infantry Division and the 11th Airborne Division. The training is a joint venture with participation from every U.S. military branch. There is also involvement from multinational partners including Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore and Malaysia.

Each exercise is built upon a multifaceted simulation. This system incorporates real-time feedback by employing virtual and constructive effects across multiple levels, which immerses participants in a comprehensive training environment.

“This allows us to keep trained and ready forces available and forward in the region,” said Gen. Charles Flynn, U.S. Army Pacific commander, during a media roundtable earlier this fiscal year. “It allows us to generate readiness in environments and in conditions that we’re most likely to operate in … It allows us to rehearse with a number of joint and multinational partners.”

Each fall, the team holds the first rotation of the year in Hawaii to train in jungle warfighting. They use the entire island chain with fictional battles taking place simultaneously in multiple locations.

Engineers from 84th Engineer Battalion, 130th Engineer Brigade erected partially notional obstacles as defense against a possible counter attack by opposing forces during Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center 23 (JPMRC-23) at Pohakuloa Training Area (PTA) on Big Island, Hawaii Nov. 3, 2022. All obstacles are partially notional on PTA due to restrictions on digging and cutting off roadways.
1 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Engineers from 84th Engineer Battalion, 130th Engineer Brigade erected partially notional obstacles as defense against a possible counter attack by opposing forces during Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center 23 (JPMRC-23) at Pohakuloa Training Area (PTA) on Big Island, Hawaii Nov. 3, 2022. All obstacles are partially notional on PTA due to restrictions on digging and cutting off roadways. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Joshua Brandenburg) VIEW ORIGINAL
U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Ospreys from Marine Corp Base Hawaii, air inserts 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division opposing forces on Pohakuloa Training Grounds, Hawaii, Nov. 7, 2022. Bilateral and multilateral exercises strengthen relationships and enhance interoperability with allies and partners through shared experiences and tough, realistic training. We routinely invite and encourage allies and partners to participate in JPMRC rotations.
2 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Ospreys from Marine Corp Base Hawaii, air inserts 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division opposing forces on Pohakuloa Training Grounds, Hawaii, Nov. 7, 2022. Bilateral and multilateral exercises strengthen relationships and enhance interoperability with allies and partners through shared experiences and tough, realistic training. We routinely invite and encourage allies and partners to participate in JPMRC rotations. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Daniel Proper) VIEW ORIGINAL
U.S. Army paratroopers assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 11th Airborne Division, move across a snow-filled landing zone during Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center-Alaska 23-02 at Yukon Training Area, Ft. Wainwright, Alaska, March 28, 2023. With more than 8,000 participants and observers from 12 different countries, JPMRC-AK 23-02’s multinational environment helps increase Arctic proficiency throughout the Army and the joint force, in support of the nation’s, and the Army’s Arctic strategy.
3 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – U.S. Army paratroopers assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 11th Airborne Division, move across a snow-filled landing zone during Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center-Alaska 23-02 at Yukon Training Area, Ft. Wainwright, Alaska, March 28, 2023. With more than 8,000 participants and observers from 12 different countries, JPMRC-AK 23-02’s multinational environment helps increase Arctic proficiency throughout the Army and the joint force, in support of the nation’s, and the Army’s Arctic strategy. (Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Patrick Sullivan) VIEW ORIGINAL
A 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) Green Beret prepares to land after conducting freefall operations in the Artic Circle as part of the Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center on March 31, 2023. Conducting freefalling operations in freezing temperatures prepares Green Berets to adapt and perform regardless of the adversities presented by the environment.
4 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) Green Beret prepares to land after conducting freefall operations in the Artic Circle as part of the Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center on March 31, 2023. Conducting freefalling operations in freezing temperatures prepares Green Berets to adapt and perform regardless of the adversities presented by the environment. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Luis M. Solorio) VIEW ORIGINAL
A U.S. Army infantryman with Bayonet Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 11th Infantry Division, sights in on an enemy target with his M4 carbine while acting as opposition forces for Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center-Alaska 23-02 at Yukon Training Area, Fort Wainwright, Alaska, April 1, 2023. JPMRC-AK 23-02 is a display of the 11th Airborne Division’s ability to survive and thrive in the Arctic, and its soldiers’ ability to fight and win our nation’s wars anywhere.
5 / 5 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A U.S. Army infantryman with Bayonet Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 11th Infantry Division, sights in on an enemy target with his M4 carbine while acting as opposition forces for Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center-Alaska 23-02 at Yukon Training Area, Fort Wainwright, Alaska, April 1, 2023. JPMRC-AK 23-02 is a display of the 11th Airborne Division’s ability to survive and thrive in the Arctic, and its soldiers’ ability to fight and win our nation’s wars anywhere. (Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Alejandro Peña) VIEW ORIGINAL

The second rotation takes place in Alaska in the spring. This is an artic-focused training exercise. The final rotation is held in the summer at a satellite location like the one used during Talisman Sabre in Australia.

These joint service/multinational training rotations help strengthen partnerships and build on their combined defense capabilities.

"The landpower network is a key component in the security architecture that helps keep the Indo-Pacific region safe, free and open because it protects national sovereignty — something that’s very important to each of our allies and partners,” Flynn said. “The interoperability and close relationships we build while training together within the landpower network is a key advantage in competition and, if necessary, in conflict.”

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