Premier DoD all hazards command supports US Army national recruiting efforts

By Walter HamJuly 19, 2023

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. – The U.S. military’s premier all hazards command is supporting U.S. Army recruiting efforts across the nation.

D’Wayne Thorpe (center), a U.S. Army Kansas City Recruiting Battalion recruit, recites the U.S. Army Oath of Enlistment, Aug. 18, 2022, in St. Joseph, Missouri, during the Kansas City Chiefs training camp. In partnership with the 1st Infantry Division and the KC Chiefs, the KC Recruiting Bn. swore in 18 recruits during the Chiefs Military Appreciation Day. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Alvin Conley, 19th Public Affairs Detachment)
D’Wayne Thorpe (center), a U.S. Army Kansas City Recruiting Battalion recruit, recites the U.S. Army Oath of Enlistment, Aug. 18, 2022, in St. Joseph, Missouri, during the Kansas City Chiefs training camp. In partnership with the 1st Infantry Division and the KC Chiefs, the KC Recruiting Bn. swore in 18 recruits during the Chiefs Military Appreciation Day. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Alvin Conley, 19th Public Affairs Detachment) (Photo Credit: Spc. Alvin Conley) VIEW ORIGINAL

Soldiers from the 20th Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, Explosives (CBRNE) Command are bolstering recruiting efforts by demonstrating their unique capabilities and describing opportunities to prospective recruits.

American Soldiers and U.S. Army civilians from the 20th CBRNE Command take on the world’s most dangerous hazards in support of joint, interagency and allied operations.

Headquartered on Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, the 20th CBRNE Command is home to 75 percent of the active-duty U.S. Army’s Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear (CBRN) specialists and Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) technicians, as well as the 1st Area Medical Laboratory, CBRNE Analytical and Remediation Activity, five Weapons of Mass Destruction Coordination Teams and three Nuclear Disablement Teams.

Maj. Steven M. Modugno, the public affairs director for the 20th CBRNE Command, said the command is supporting the recruiting effort with everything from EOD techs in bomb suits at recruiting events to Soldiers referring potential recruits in the communities where they live.

“We have Soldiers on 19 bases in 16 states who are contributing to the recruiting effort in their local communities across the nation,” said Modugno, a native of Santa Clarita, California, and former United States Military Academy, West Point instructor. “Our Soldiers are defending our nation from all hazards and helping to inform the American public about the opportunities available in the Army.”

Serving as one of the 19 installations, Fort Stewart serves as home base for the 83rd CBRN Battalion which is part of the 48th Chemical Brigade and 20th CBRNE Command.

Modugno said the U.S. Army offers potential recruits the opportunity to serve their nation while learning valuable skills that will help them in the future.

“During its 248 years of defending liberty at home and overseas, the U.S. Army has forged warriors and leaders who have made our nation the greatest in the world,” said Modugno.

Not only does the U.S. Army offer educational benefits, training, health and dental care, housing and allowances, but it also offers up to $50,000 in bonuses.

Command Sgt. Maj. Dave Silva, the senior enlisted leader for the 20th CBRNE Command, said the recruiting effort falls in line with the Army’s priorities of people and readiness.

“Today’s recruits ensure tomorrow’s readiness,” said Silva, a Master Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician from Long Beach, California. “The engagements EOD and CBRN personnel participate support national, corps and division recruiting events and are tremendously successful because 20th CBRNE Command Soldiers are extraordinary professionals with unique skill sets and amazing stories from diverse missions and training.”

Silva said the Army has taken him from his hometown of Long Beach, California to all 50 states and five of the seven continents. He has also deployed seven times, served in Iraq and Afghanistan and served on protection missions for presidents and the Pope.

Displays and equipment catch potential recruits’ attention but conversations with Soldiers pique the interest of potential recruits, said Silva.

“We want folks to see themselves when they see our Army. When Americans talk with our Soldiers, it connects us, the Army, to the nation, to our communities and allows us to share that the Army is not only filled with amazing opportunities but also filled with amazing people. It’s the Army family that people enlist to be a part of. The job is our role in the family,” said Silva. “Lots of employers are offering training, we are offering purpose and belonging.”