Guam Debris Removal
1 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – USACE debris teams are out the on the island of Guam assessing the amount and types of debris that are already out on curbsides awaiting pick-up, a process that will allow USACE to determine the scope of the mission. Here Sacramento District Civil Engineer Technician Shelley Beaman assesses a debris pile in the village of Yona. (Photo Credit: Sara Goodeyon) VIEW ORIGINAL
Guam Debris Removal
2 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – USACE debris teams are out the on the island of Guam assessing the amount and types of debris that are already out on curbsides awaiting pick-up, a process that will allow USACE to determine the scope of the mission. Here Sacramento District Civil Engineer Technician Shelley Beaman explains the debris mission to Guam resident Richard Aguero and his father Ted Aguero. The men have already placed their debris in the ROW. (Photo Credit: Sara Goodeyon) VIEW ORIGINAL
Guam Debris Removal
3 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – USACE debris teams are out the on the island of Guam assessing the amount and types of debris that are already out on curbsides awaiting pick-up, a process that will allow USACE to determine the scope of the mission. Here is an example of the type of debris that has already been placed along the curbside. (Photo Credit: Sara Goodeyon) VIEW ORIGINAL
Guam Debris Removal Mission
4 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – USACE debris teams are out the on the island of Guam assessing the amount and types of debris that are already out on curbsides awaiting pick-up, a process that will allow USACE to determine the scope of the mission. Here is an example of the type of debris that has already been placed along the curbside. (Photo Credit: Sara Goodeyon) VIEW ORIGINAL

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has received a mission assignment from FEMA to assist in the collection of eligible debris on the island of Guam as part of the federal response to Typhoon Mawar.

USACE debris teams are out the on the island assessing the amount and types of debris that are already out on curbsides awaiting pick-up, a process that will allow USACE to determine the scope of the mission.

“Our teams are going out and we’re driving the streets to look at quantities of debris that are along the rights-of-way (ROW) to get an idea of how much is really out there that needs to be collected, and what kind of debris is out there,” said Sacramento District Civil Engineer Technician Shelley Beaman.

Beaman is a quality assurance specialist with the debris mission. She was recently in Yona going street-by-street gauging debris and logging the amounts already placed in the ROW, which is curbside within 10-feet of the edge of the road. Residents are asked to sort the debris when they place it curbside so that it will be easier for the crews to collect, and not to block direct access to the debris with parked or abandoned cars, or other means. Debris off the road more than 10-feet, behind a fence or barrier, or on private property cannot be collected by the contractor.

“We’re asking that they separate the different types of debris,” said Beaman. “If they have vegetation, put that in one pile, if they have construction debris such as plaster or wood boards put it in another pile, and if they have household goods like refrigerators or freezers, put those in another pile.”

The debris eligible for collection is vegetative debris, large appliances, household furnishings such as mattresses and couches, construction and demolition debris, ferrous and non-ferrous metal, cans, and tin. Debris not eligible for collection are tires, vehicles and boats, electronics, daily household garbage, toilet bowls, sinks, bathtubs, and household hazardous waste.

Debris collection trucks operated by contractors will make one pass through each village, with separate trucks for vegetative debris, white goods, and construction and demolition materials. The contractor will be picking up vegetation first, then construction and demolition material, and conclude with the collection of white goods. These separate debris stream sweeps may be days apart, but all public roads on Guam will be covered, and all eligible materials will collected.

A schedule of when and where the trucks will be collecting will be available to the public. Residents can place their eligible material at their ROW at any point between now and when the collection crews pass by their residence.

This program is limited to residential properties.