2022 Best Squad Competition — Day 4

By U.S. ArmyOctober 4, 2022

Spc. Ethan Lee, left, and Sgt. 1st Class Dung Thien Le, of Squad 8, representing the U.S. Army Cyber Command, train on the use of the M240L machine gun during the Army’s first-ever Best Squad Competition on Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Oct 2, 2022. The Army Best Squad Competition focuses on the most influential level of leadership where the majority of our Soldiers reside; the Squad.
1 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Spc. Ethan Lee, left, and Sgt. 1st Class Dung Thien Le, of Squad 8, representing the U.S. Army Cyber Command, train on the use of the M240L machine gun during the Army’s first-ever Best Squad Competition on Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Oct 2, 2022. The Army Best Squad Competition focuses on the most influential level of leadership where the majority of our Soldiers reside; the Squad. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. James B. Paxson) VIEW ORIGINAL
A U.S. Army Soldier competing in the Army Best Squad Competition seals his mask during a Chemical, Biological, Radioactive, Nuclear (CBRN) assessment on Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Oct. 2, 2022. The week-long competition will assess each squad on their technical and tactical proficiency, as well as their ability to work as a disciplined and cohesive team, featuring a multitude of fitness, knowledge and combat-related events.
2 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A U.S. Army Soldier competing in the Army Best Squad Competition seals his mask during a Chemical, Biological, Radioactive, Nuclear (CBRN) assessment on Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Oct. 2, 2022. The week-long competition will assess each squad on their technical and tactical proficiency, as well as their ability to work as a disciplined and cohesive team, featuring a multitude of fitness, knowledge and combat-related events. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Jacob Moir) VIEW ORIGINAL
U.S. Soldiers from squad eight, representing the U.S. Army Cyber Command and competing in the Army’s first-ever Best Squad Competition, zero weapons on Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Oct. 2, 2022. The week-long competition will assess each squad on their technical and tactical proficiency, as well as their ability to work as a disciplined and cohesive team, featuring a multitude of fitness, knowledge and combat-related events.
3 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – U.S. Soldiers from squad eight, representing the U.S. Army Cyber Command and competing in the Army’s first-ever Best Squad Competition, zero weapons on Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Oct. 2, 2022. The week-long competition will assess each squad on their technical and tactical proficiency, as well as their ability to work as a disciplined and cohesive team, featuring a multitude of fitness, knowledge and combat-related events. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army Photo by Spc. Rognie Ortiz Vega) VIEW ORIGINAL
Soldiers of Squad 5, representing the U.S. Army Special Operations Command, train on land navigation during the Army’s first-ever Best Squad Competition on Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Oct 2, 2022. The Army Best Squad Competition tests Soldiers on their individual and collective ability to adapt-to and overcome challenging scenarios and battle-readiness events, evaluating their physical endurance, technical skills, and tactical abilities under stress and extreme fatigue.
4 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers of Squad 5, representing the U.S. Army Special Operations Command, train on land navigation during the Army’s first-ever Best Squad Competition on Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Oct 2, 2022. The Army Best Squad Competition tests Soldiers on their individual and collective ability to adapt-to and overcome challenging scenarios and battle-readiness events, evaluating their physical endurance, technical skills, and tactical abilities under stress and extreme fatigue. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. James B. Paxson) VIEW ORIGINAL
U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Philip Amick, representing the U.S. Army Reserve, prepares for the M240B machine gun lane during the Army's first-ever Best Squad competition, held on Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Oct. 2, 2022. The Army Best Squad Competition tests soldiers on their individual and collective ability to adapt-to and overcome challenging scenarios and battle-readiness events, evaluating their physical and mental endurance, technical and tactical abilities, and basic warrior skills under stress and extreme fatigue.
5 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Philip Amick, representing the U.S. Army Reserve, prepares for the M240B machine gun lane during the Army's first-ever Best Squad competition, held on Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Oct. 2, 2022. The Army Best Squad Competition tests soldiers on their individual and collective ability to adapt-to and overcome challenging scenarios and battle-readiness events, evaluating their physical and mental endurance, technical and tactical abilities, and basic warrior skills under stress and extreme fatigue. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. Cole Meiers) VIEW ORIGINAL
U.S. Soldiers from squad seven, representing the U.S. Army Reserves and competing in the Army’s first-ever Best Squad Competition, zero weapons on Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Oct. 2, 2022. The week-long competition will assess each squad on their technical and tactical proficiency, as well as their ability to work as a disciplined and cohesive team, featuring a multitude of fitness, knowledge and combat-related events.
6 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – U.S. Soldiers from squad seven, representing the U.S. Army Reserves and competing in the Army’s first-ever Best Squad Competition, zero weapons on Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Oct. 2, 2022. The week-long competition will assess each squad on their technical and tactical proficiency, as well as their ability to work as a disciplined and cohesive team, featuring a multitude of fitness, knowledge and combat-related events. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army Photo by Spc. Rognie Ortiz Vega) VIEW ORIGINAL