Fort Rucker 9/11 Moving Tribute
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Fort Rucker Directorate of Public Safety personnel honored the heroic acts and sacrifice given by Stephen Siller, a firefighter who died in the 9/11 attacks, at a Fort Rucker 9/11 Moving Tribute Sept. 9, 2022. Photo by Jay Mann. (Photo Credit: Jay Mann) VIEW ORIGINAL
Fort Rucker 9/11 Moving Tribute
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Fort Rucker 9/11 Moving Tribute passes the U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence Headquarters Sept. 9, 2022, as the group pays tribute to Stephen Siller, a firefighter that gave his life while saving others during the 9/11 attacks in New York. Photo by Jay Mann. (Photo Credit: Jay Mann) VIEW ORIGINAL
Fort Rucker 9/11 Moving Tribute
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Col. Robert J. Holcombe, Fort Rucker garrison commander, and Command Sgt. Maj. Christopher T. Doss, garrison command sergeant major, speak with firefighters as they all prepare to begin the Fort Rucker 9/11 Moving Tribute Sept. 9, 2022. Photo by Jay Mann. (Photo Credit: Jay Mann) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT RUCKER, Ala. – The Fort Rucker Directorate of Public Safety here honored the heroic acts and sacrifice given by Stephen Siller, a firefighter who died in the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on New York, with the 2.5-mile Fort Rucker 9/11 Moving Tribute September 9.

Deputy Fire Chief Shane Brown said he doesn’t want people’s sacrifices on 9/11 to be in vain, “We want to make sure to celebrate their lives, and to make sure that everything that they and everyone who came after them has done is remembered.”

Brown said that the significance of working for the largest fire department in the Department of Defense is not lost on Fort Rucker firefighters. “Here, we protect those who protect us,” he explained, “We are here for the warfighters, the pilots and their families.”

Maj. Tom Burch, Fort Rucker provost marshal, said the distance of the moving tribute is also significant. “When the 9/11 attacks occurred, firefighter Stephen Siller was able to get 2.5 miles from the World Trade Center when traffic was stopped. He then put on all his firefighter gear and walked the rest of the way to the towers. In a true act of selfless service, he gave his life helping others. This walk is to commemorate his memory.”

Brown said it was only his second day on the job when the 9/11 attacks took place. “Everyone knew that life as we knew it had changed forever. I remember sitting at the fire station and watching the events unfold like it was yesterday. Suddenly the definition of teamwork and family took on a new meaning.”

He asked participants in the Fort Rucker 9/11 Moving Tribute, “As you take part in this moving tribute, be proud and walk with pride as we honor and celebrate the lives of the fallen as a result of the events of 9/11.”