Soldiers attack their mission at JBLM
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Soldiers from 1st Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, rake and bag trash items found on one of the training areas on Joint Base Lewis-McChord May 4. (Photo Credit: Talysa Lloyd McCall) VIEW ORIGINAL
Soldiers attack their mission at JBLM
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Spec. Thomas Randazzo, Chinook helicopter maintainer with 4th Battalion, 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment, moves bulk items into a collection bin on Joint Base Lewis-McChord May 4.  (Photo Credit: Talysa Lloyd McCall) VIEW ORIGINAL
Talysa Lloyd McCall, Joint Base Lewis-McChord Public Affairs
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Pfc. Zane Autrey, small arms and artillery repairman with 1st Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, collects large amounts of enoxaparin sodium syringes were found in a training area on Joint Base Lewis-McChord May 4. (Photo Credit: Talysa Lloyd McCall) VIEW ORIGINAL

JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD, Wash. -- Springtime is here, and a little work on everyone's part during spring clean-up made a big difference on Joint Base Lewis-McChord.

“Just like in the fall, Soldiers from all over base are out in the training areas and fields across JBLM collecting trash and bulk items that were left there,” said Ronald Grantham, operations officer with the Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Security on JBLM.

The week-long event started May 2 when all units and Soldiers worked together to clean up the outsides of buildings, training areas and main roads surrounding JBLM. In total, 146.85 tons of metal, wood, yard waste and trash were collected during this year’s spring clean-up – that's nearly 300,000 pounds.

“On any given day there could be at least 150 Soldiers helping out,” Grantham said. “Each unit has one to three training areas to clean.”

Once the units have completed their mission, range operations will inspect the area.

This year’s spring clean-up was unique in that it was the first time JBLM held a paper shred event in conjunction with the trash pick-up. JLBM Directorate of Public Works Environmental Division sponsored the shred event in partnership with LeMay Pierce County Refuse and it was available to JBLM organizations and units.

“There was a very positive response and hopefully we can do this at least once a year,” said Catherine Hamilton-Wissmer, Environmental Outreach coordinator with DPW on JBLM. “Please keep recycling. Clean recycling results in money being returned to JBLM.”

This is the first shred event on an installation as big as JBLM, usually these events take place at local banks and schools. There are a few important reasons for this partnership.

“Everyone is concerned about protecting their identity and proper shredding is a key ingredient to for that,” Justin Vanweerdhuizen, mobile shred driver with LeMay Pierce County Refuse said. “If done improperly, your papers could end up in the wrong hands.”

Another part of the reason for the shred event is to have a bigger impact than when individuals shred at home or in the office.

“Recycling in bulk makes a huge difference when the items arrive at the sorting facilities,” Hamilton-Wissmer said.

Roughly 3,000 pounds of shredded paper was collected this season.

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