SATMO Training in Panama
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Maj. Boyd and Sgt. 1st Class Gillett demonstrate proper techniques on entering and clearing rooms during Close Quarter Battle training. Boyd and Gillett are members of the SATMO mobile training team that provided security assistance training to Panamanian officials Feb. 5-28, 2022. (Photo Credit: Sgt. 1st Class John Martinez) VIEW ORIGINAL
SATMO Training in Panama
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Sgt. 1st Class Carcamo observes students during a live fire exercise, ensuring they’re using proper techniques and accurately engaging targets. Carcamo is a member of the SATMO mobile training team that provided security assistance training to Panamanian officials, to help the partner nation develop their commissioned and non-commissioned officer (NCO) corps Feb. 5-28, 2022. (Photo Credit: Sgt. 1st Class John Martinez) VIEW ORIGINAL
SATMO Training in Panama
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – 1st Sgt. Meadows leads 52 Panamanian forces during a 6-mile march up a mountain and in austere conditions. Meadows is a member of the SATMO mobile training team that provided security assistance training to Panamanian officials, helping the partner nation develop their commissioned and non-commissioned officer (NCO) corps Feb. 5-28, 2022. (Photo Credit: Sgt. 1st Class John Martinez) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT BRAGG, N.C. – A U.S. Army mobile training team (MTT) provided security assistance training to Panamanian officials, helping the partner nation develop their commissioned and non-commissioned officer (NCO) corps Feb. 5-28, 2022.

The MTT, consisting of Soldiers from the Fort Bragg-based Security Assistance Training Management Organization (SATMO), trained 52 leaders from Panama’s Servicio Nacional Aeronautical (SENAN), Servicio Nacional de Fronteras (SENAFRONT), Policia Nacional and the Servicio de Proteccion Institucional (SPI).

According to Panama’s Naval Air Infantry Commandant Capt. Ariel Rosas, the training was critical and is expected to impact real world operations in the Central American nation and throughout the region.

“It helped increase the capability of operational leadership. Since our units constantly operate in restricted areas where decision-making is important, it can sometimes be the difference between life and death,” said Rosas. “This training has increased our unit knowledge, ensuring that measurements are carried out successfully.”

Training included patrolling in austere environments, weapons training, formations and orders of movement as well as troop leading procedures, and is expected to assist Panamanian land, sea and air forces as they fight against drug and human trafficking, and increase border security.

Participants received instruction on the Tactical Combat Casualty Care All Service Members Course, the U.S. military’s guide for trauma life support in prehospital combat medicine.

Designed to reduce preventable deaths, the course highlighted rapid casualty assessments, tourniquet application, pressure bandage application, wound packing, hemostatic dressing application, and airway maneuvers.

Participants also executed mission briefs and trained on close quarter ranges and hand-to-hand combat. The experience was a win-win for both the Panamanians and the U.S. instructors.

“The importance of conducting training with different institutions is crucial for us since it strengthens knowledge and increases our ability to carry out operations in conjunction with our units. They develop different capacities, both mental, physical and intellectual, which helps to fulfill the institutional mission,” said Rosas.

Training culminated in dense Panamanian jungle with a full scale exercise that tested everything they learned during the course. Teams were required to plan, infiltrate, clear a building, react to contact, treat a casualty, and break contact.

“This training strengthened our relationship with the United States, increasing our institutional capabilities, which helps to fulfill the institutional mission” said Rosas. “This is evident when our units carry out team missions. Our units will put knowledge into practice, to carry out more effective and efficient missions.”

SATMO MTTs are made up of Soldiers who are considered to be subject matter experts at both the tactical and operational levels. Specialties employed include special operations, aviation, infantry, air defense artillery, field artillery and logistics. In support of U.S. foreign policy, MTTs enable interoperability and increase allied and partner capabilities through hands-on training and relationship-building.

SATMO has had a continuous embedded presence worldwide with America’s allies and partners since 1974, and it is the primary organization dedicated to overseas training management for the Army Security Assistance Enterprise.

Last year alone, the command conducted more than 40 Security Assistance Team missions in over 20 countries supporting all Geographic Combatant Commands, and executed funds totaling more than $700 million.

It is a subordinate unit of the U.S. Army Security Assistance Command, which falls under the Army Materiel Command. "For more information about SATMO and its vital security assistance mission, visit www.army.mil/satmo.