Scott Luellman, investigator with the U.S. Army Garrison Wiesbaden Military Police Investigations division shows third graders at Wiesbaden Elementary different fingerprint designs in a presentation on Nov. 16, 2021.
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Scott Luellman, investigator with the U.S. Army Garrison Wiesbaden Military Police Investigations division shows third graders at Wiesbaden Elementary different fingerprint designs in a presentation on Nov. 16, 2021. (Photo Credit: Brady Gross) VIEW ORIGINAL
Staff Sgt. Anastasiya Jones, community outreach coordinator with the U.S. Army Garrison Wiesbaden military police engages third graders at Wiesbaden Elementary in a fingerprinting activity on Nov. 16, 2021.
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Staff Sgt. Anastasiya Jones, community outreach coordinator with the U.S. Army Garrison Wiesbaden military police engages third graders at Wiesbaden Elementary in a fingerprinting activity on Nov. 16, 2021. (Photo Credit: Brady Gross) VIEW ORIGINAL
Scott Luellman, investigator with the U.S. Army Garrison Wiesbaden Military Police Investigations division engages with students at Wiesbaden Elementary during a fingerprinting activity on Nov. 16, 2021.
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Scott Luellman, investigator with the U.S. Army Garrison Wiesbaden Military Police Investigations division engages with students at Wiesbaden Elementary during a fingerprinting activity on Nov. 16, 2021. (Photo Credit: Brady Gross) VIEW ORIGINAL

WIESBADEN, Germany – On Nov. 15 and 16 at Wiesbaden Elementary, the Directorate of Emergency Services and military police taught a group of third graders all about fingerprinting to showcase how science can help identify people and assist investigators in doing their job.

Scott Luellman, investigator with the Military Police Investigations division, showed students how fingerprints are unique on humans and how they can be used.

Staff Sgt. Anastasiya Jones works with the military police community policing program as their outreach coordinator. Along with this fingerprinting class, she helps coordinate and engages with the community at a variety of events, such as Halloween activities, Law Enforcement Day and an upcoming K9 demonstration in December.

“The program helps people see what the military police do and how we stay connected with our community,” said Jones.

In its third year, the fingerprinting presentation is now integrated into the elementary’s curriculum and engages over 60 students each round.

“Thank you all for letting us come and teach you kids the past two days. It’s the best part of my day,” said Luellman to the students after finishing this year’s activity.