Warrant officers celebrate 103rd birthday
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The youngest and oldest warrant officers cut the official birthday cake celebrating 103 years of history in the U.S. Army during a celebration hosted by the Military Intelligence Warrant Officer Training Branch July 9 at Brown Parade Field, Fort Huachuca, Arizona. (Left) Warrant Officer 1 Cheyanne Davis, a Tyler, Texas, native attending military intelligence warrant officer training here, joins (right) Chief Warrant Officer 5 Aaron Anderson, eighth chief warrant officer of the Military Intelligence Corps and oldest warrant officer serving here, to cut and serve the cake. (Photo Credit: Karen Stevens Sampson) VIEW ORIGINAL
Warrant officers celebrate 103rd birthday
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Chief Warrant Officer 5 Aaron Anderson, eighth chief warrant officer of the Military Intelligence Corps, highlights the technical expertise of warrant officers during the 103rd birthday celebration hosted by the Military Intelligence Warrant Officer Training Branch July 9 at Brown Parade Field, Fort Huachuca, Arizona. (Photo Credit: Karen Stevens Sampson) VIEW ORIGINAL
Warrant officers celebrate 103rd birthday
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Retired Chief Warrant Officer 5 Matthew Martin, keynote speaker, comments on the upward trajectory of the warrant officer role and the flexibility in leadership positions during the 103rd birthday celebration of the U.S. Army Warrant Officer Corps hosted by the Military Intelligence Warrant Officer Training Branch July 9 at Brown Parade Field, Fort Huachuca, Arizona. (Photo Credit: Karen Stevens Sampson) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT HUACHUCA, Ariz. – Warrant officers commemorated 103 years of history in the U.S. Army during a celebration hosted by the Military Intelligence Warrant Officer Training Branch July 9 at Brown Parade Field.

The Warrant Officer Corps was founded on July 9, 1918, when an act of Congress created the Army Mine Planter Service as part of the Coast Artillery Corps.

It was not until the start of World War II, in 1941, that the Counterintelligence Corps, the pre-cursor to the Military Intelligence Corps, considered authorizing warrant officers and, in 1945, appointed nearly 400 warrant officers to the counterintelligence ranks. In 1984, the U.S. Army Intelligence Center and School established the Warrant Officer Education Training Program. Today, the Military Intelligence Branch has eight different military occupational skills, the most of any warrant officer branch.

"Warrant officers are self-aware and adaptive technical experts, combat leaders, trainers and advisors," said Chief Warrant Officer 5 Aaron Anderson, eighth chief warrant officer of the Military Intelligence Corps. "They are counted on to administer, manage, maintain, operate and integrate Army processes, systems and equipment across the full spectrum of Army operations."

The Army has more than 26,000 warrant officers serving in eighteen branches throughout the active Army.

"Happy Birthday Wolf Pack!" exclaimed retired Chief Warrant Officer 5 Matthew Martin, keynote speaker.

Martin commented on the upward trajectory of the warrant officer role and the flexibility in leadership positions.

"Warrant officers are much more than technical experts," Martin said. "They are shaped, molded and utilized as adaptive leaders."

The ceremony kept with Army tradition as the youngest and oldest warrant officers cut the cake with a saber.

Warrant Officer 1 Cheyanne Davis, a Tyler, Texas, native attending military intelligence warrant officer training here, joined Anderson, the oldest warrant officer serving here, to cut and serve the cake.

"Being a warrant officer is a new challenge and allows me to specialize in my job," Davis said. "I also want to mentor and inspire intelligence analysts and get them excited about the occupation."

After training, Davis will be assigned to the 39th Brigade Engineer Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) at Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

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Fort Huachuca is home to the U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence, the U.S. Army Network Enterprise Technology Command (NETCOM)/9th Army Signal Command, and more than 48 supported tenants representing a diverse, multiservice population. Our unique environment encompasses 964 square miles of restricted airspace and 2,500 square miles of protected electronic ranges, critical components to the national defense mission.

Located in Cochise County, in southeast Arizona, about 15 miles north of the border with Mexico, Fort Huachuca is an Army installation with rich frontier history. Established in 1877, the Fort was declared a national landmark in 1976.

We are the Army's Home. Learn more at https://home.army.mil/huachuca.