The Chief of Transportation, Brig. Gen. James M. Smith, passes the Trans. Corps’ colors to Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg, CASCOM and Fort Lee commanding general, during a relinquishment of command/responsibility May 6 at Wylie Hall’s "Doc" Washburn Auditorium.  Smith spent 10 months at Fort Lee, also serving as president, Army Logistics University. The Hampton native is slated to command the 21st Theater Sustainment Command in Germany.
The Chief of Transportation, Brig. Gen. James M. Smith, passes the Trans. Corps’ colors to Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg, CASCOM and Fort Lee commanding general, during a relinquishment of command/responsibility May 6 at Wylie Hall’s "Doc" Washburn Auditorium. Smith spent 10 months at Fort Lee, also serving as president, Army Logistics University. The Hampton native is slated to command the 21st Theater Sustainment Command in Germany. (Photo Credit: Terrance Bell) VIEW ORIGINAL

FORT LEE, Va. (May 11, 2021) – The Transportation Corps said goodbye to its commanding general and top enlisted leader during a combined relinquishment of command and responsibility ceremony May 6 in Wylie Hall’s “Doc” Washburn Auditorium here.

Brig. Gen. James M. Smith and Command Sgt. Maj. Terrence T. Scarborough were lauded for their dedication and commitment after tenures of 10 and 27 months, respectively. Smith has been reassigned to Kaiserslautern, Germany, where he will serve as commanding general of 21st Theater Sustainment Command. Scarborough is set to become the 593rd Expeditionary Sustainment Command CSM at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.

Their replacements – Col. Frederick L. Crist and CSM Randy Brown – are wrapping up their tours of duty elsewhere and will be arriving at Fort Lee soon.

Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg, Combined Arms Support Command and Fort Lee commanding general, hosted the ceremony. His senior enlisted advisor, CSM Jorge Escobedo, sat among the estimated 75 audience members in attendance. The event was livestreamed on the T-School’s official Facebook page.

Prior to the relinquishment ceremony, both Smith and Scarborough were presented with Legions of Merit and other awards. Their family members were recognized for their contributions to the community as well.

Smith – last assigned to Fort Bragg, N.C. – has been tri-hatted since he arrived, primarily serving as the Chief of Transportation while also functioning as the Army Logistics University president and CASCOM’s deputy commanding general for leader development and training.

Fogg, referring to that collective performance, said Smith had been “knocking it out of the park every day” since arriving at Fort Lee.

As the COT alone, Smith was responsible for the training received by military members and government civilians attending 70 different transportation courses taught at Fort Lee, Joint Base Langley-Eustis and Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. Despite the scope of his duties, Fogg said he always took care of people.

Brig. Gen. James M. Smith speaks before audience members during the Transportation Corps Relinquishment of Command and Responsibility Ceremony May 6 at Wylie Hall's Washburn Auditorium. Smith, the 31st Chief of Transportation, is due to take over the commanding general’s position at the 21st Theater Sustainment Command in Germany.
Brig. Gen. James M. Smith speaks before audience members during the Transportation Corps Relinquishment of Command and Responsibility Ceremony May 6 at Wylie Hall's Washburn Auditorium. Smith, the 31st Chief of Transportation, is due to take over the commanding general’s position at the 21st Theater Sustainment Command in Germany. (Photo Credit: Terrance Bell) VIEW ORIGINAL

“You were absolutely engaged at the leadership level … putting people first,” he said while proudly glancing at Smith from the lectern. “We all thank you for that.”

Smith’s impact, however, went beyond people. He oversaw review of the Trans. Corps’ contingency plans for largescale combat operations; its contribution to the ongoing autonomous vehicle testing project; its plans to upgrade the Army’s tactical wheeled vehicle fleet; and efforts to refine maritime operations functionality.

At ALU, which trains 20,000 students annually, Smith was tasked to step in after the sudden and unexpected death of former President Michael K. Williams in May 2020. While serving in that capacity, Fogg noted, Smith was able to provide some continuity in overseeing daily operations and major projects, several of which he listed, saying “it’s just been fantastic what you’ve been able to do … and I absolutely appreciate it.”

During his turn addressing the audience, Smith thanked the in-person and virtual ceremony attendees and then offered his gratitude to regiment members for their contributions. He said he was grateful to Fogg for his trust and mentorship while serving in the various capacities.

“What a tremendous honor and opportunity to serve in each of these roles and many thanks for the support, the guidance, trust and confidence over the past year,” he said.

Smith went on to thank members of the higher headquarters leadership and others who made contributions during his stint as the COT. Lastly, he thanked his immediate family members, all of whom were present.

Scarborough, who arrived here three years ago from the 595th Transportation Brigade, Sembach, Germany, first served under Brig. Gen. Jered P. Helwig, the 30th COT. Fogg said the 29-year Soldier was “absolutely the right noncommissioned officer to lead the Transportation Corps” from the time he was selected.

Command Sgt. Maj. Terrence T. Scarborough speaks before audience members during the Transportation Corps Relinquishment of Command and Responsibility Ceremony May 6 at Wylie Hall's Washburn Auditorium.  Scarborough, the 14th Trans. Corps CSM, is headed for the top enlisted position at the 593th Expeditionary Sustainment Command at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.
Command Sgt. Maj. Terrence T. Scarborough speaks before audience members during the Transportation Corps Relinquishment of Command and Responsibility Ceremony May 6 at Wylie Hall's Washburn Auditorium. Scarborough, the 14th Trans. Corps CSM, is headed for the top enlisted position at the 593th Expeditionary Sustainment Command at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. (Photo Credit: Terrance Bell) VIEW ORIGINAL

Citing Scarborough’s achievements as the corps’ top NCO, Fogg said he “drove an expansion of transportation training and education” for the One Army School System, which standardizes training across active and reserve components.

Scarborough also established a “great relationship and collaboration between the transportation, ordnance and quartermaster” corps to improve NCO training, said Fogg, and “ultimately influenced the training of thousands of noncommissioned officers who come here for their military education.”

In conclusion, Fogg said at his core Scarborough was about “taking care of Soldiers, putting people first and really understanding what all that means. (It was) showing that example to junior leaders at echelon by being there with your presence and … modeling what right looks like.”

Smith also labeled Scarborough’s expertise as critical to quickly familiarizing him with CASCOM operations. More importantly, though, he considers him an exceptional Soldier.

“As an NCO should be, you have been the backbone – not just for me – but for the entire Transportation Corps regiment. Your care of and support for the Transportation NCO Corps has been phenomenal and the initiatives you led will pay dividends for transportation Soldiers and NCOs for years to come.”

Scarborough, in the presence of his wife, children and grandchild, was precise in his wording, thanking all who supported him and summing up his time at Fort Lee as fruitful and productive.

He seemed to be addressing transporters all over the world when he thanked those who continue to make the Transportation Corps relevant.

“I know that you’re out there and know you’re working diligently to sustain movement of personnel and materiel. You are value-added and because of you, the corps’ capacity and capability at the tactical, operational and strategic levels are beyond measure. I’m proud to have been your 14th regimental command sergeant major.”