A participant races to the finish line during the Norwegian Foot March on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Mar. 19, 2021. Participants had to complete an 18.6 mile ruck march within time standards according to age and gender, while carrying a 25-pound rucksack, and then complete a standard duty day. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Richard Carlisi)
1 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A participant races to the finish line during the Norwegian Foot March on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Mar. 19, 2021. Participants had to complete an 18.6 mile ruck march within time standards according to age and gender, while carrying a 25-pound rucksack, and then complete a standard duty day. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Richard Carlisi) (Photo Credit: Spc. Richard Carlisi) VIEW ORIGINAL
Maj. Trevor Williams, a brigade fire support officer with 1st Battalion, 37th Field Artillery Regiment, 1-2 Stryker Brigade Combat Team (left), and his brother, 1st Sgt. Joshua Williams, 571st Sapper Company, 864th Engineer Battalion, 555th Engineer Brigade, pose for a photo prior to the Norwegian Foot March on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Mar. 19, 2021. Although serving in different units, JBLM is the first duty station these brothers have shared after each has served more than ten years. 1st Sgt. Williams said, “I am thankful for the opportunity to participate in this unique event with my brother and a few hundred great American Soldiers.” (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Richard Carlisi)
2 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Maj. Trevor Williams, a brigade fire support officer with 1st Battalion, 37th Field Artillery Regiment, 1-2 Stryker Brigade Combat Team (left), and his brother, 1st Sgt. Joshua Williams, 571st Sapper Company, 864th Engineer Battalion, 555th Engineer Brigade, pose for a photo prior to the Norwegian Foot March on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Mar. 19, 2021. Although serving in different units, JBLM is the first duty station these brothers have shared after each has served more than ten years. 1st Sgt. Williams said, “I am thankful for the opportunity to participate in this unique event with my brother and a few hundred great American Soldiers.” (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Richard Carlisi) (Photo Credit: Spc. Richard Carlisi) VIEW ORIGINAL
1st Sgt. Jeremy Garrison, 514th Ground Ambulance Company, briefs participants prior to the start of the Norwegian Foot March on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Mar. 19, 2021. Participants wanting to earn the Norwegian Armed Forces Skill Badge must complete the 18.6-mile march prior to the start of ‘Begin Morning Nautical Twilight’, which is about one hour before sunrise and then complete a typical duty day to earn the award. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Richard Carlisi)
3 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – 1st Sgt. Jeremy Garrison, 514th Ground Ambulance Company, briefs participants prior to the start of the Norwegian Foot March on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Mar. 19, 2021. Participants wanting to earn the Norwegian Armed Forces Skill Badge must complete the 18.6-mile march prior to the start of ‘Begin Morning Nautical Twilight’, which is about one hour before sunrise and then complete a typical duty day to earn the award. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Richard Carlisi) (Photo Credit: Spc. Richard Carlisi) VIEW ORIGINAL
A Soldier weighs his rucksack prior to the Norwegian Foot March on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Mar. 19, 2021. The Norwegian Foot March badge is an approved foreign award and may be worn on the Army Service Uniform; to earn it participants must ruck march 18.6 miles with a 25-pound rucksack in under 4 hours and 30 minutes followed by working a typical duty day. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Richard Carlisi)
4 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A Soldier weighs his rucksack prior to the Norwegian Foot March on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Mar. 19, 2021. The Norwegian Foot March badge is an approved foreign award and may be worn on the Army Service Uniform; to earn it participants must ruck march 18.6 miles with a 25-pound rucksack in under 4 hours and 30 minutes followed by working a typical duty day. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Richard Carlisi) (Photo Credit: Spc. Richard Carlisi) VIEW ORIGINAL
Pfc. Sterling Harvath, an infantryman with 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 2-1 Stryker Brigade Combat Team, checks his rucksack prior to the Norwegian Foot March on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Mar. 19, 2021. Participants inspected their rucksacks to make sure the weight was distributed in a manner that would minimize aches and pains along the route. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Richard Carlisi)
5 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Pfc. Sterling Harvath, an infantryman with 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 2-1 Stryker Brigade Combat Team, checks his rucksack prior to the Norwegian Foot March on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Mar. 19, 2021. Participants inspected their rucksacks to make sure the weight was distributed in a manner that would minimize aches and pains along the route. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Richard Carlisi) (Photo Credit: Spc. Richard Carlisi) VIEW ORIGINAL
Participants register prior to the Norwegian Foot March on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Mar. 19, 2021. Planners were originally expecting about 50 participants, which turned into more than 300, when news of the event spread. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Richard Carlisi)
6 / 6 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Participants register prior to the Norwegian Foot March on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Mar. 19, 2021. Planners were originally expecting about 50 participants, which turned into more than 300, when news of the event spread. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Richard Carlisi) (Photo Credit: Spc. Richard Carlisi) VIEW ORIGINAL

JBLM Norwegian Foot March

U.S. Army story by Spc. Richard Carlisi

I Corps PAO

JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD, Wash.– More than 300 Soldiers participated in a Norwegian Foot March at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, hosted by the 514th Medical Company (Ground Ambulance) March 19, 2021.

Known as Marsjmerket, is a Norwegian Armed Forces skill badge earned after participants complete the 18.6-mile march with a 25-pound rucksack within set time standards according to age and gender.

“This event is just what Soldiers needed during COVID,” said Capt. Shauna Pearson, the event organizer. “It’s been a really long time since Soldiers have been able to get together like this. There’s comradery, they’re working together, and above all, they’re having fun.”

Originating during the WWI time period, in 1915, the Norwegian Foot March aimed to provide a realistic experience to civilians and new military recruits of what it is like serving in the field. Over the next century, the event evolved into a foreign service badge earned by completing the foot march to standard.