TACOM senior enlisted advisor makes first visit to Sierra Army Depot
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Janet Smylie, Sierra Army Depot material examiner identifier, briefs Command Sgt. Maj. Jerry M. Charles, U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command senior enlisted advisor, on the process of identifying and sorting incomming material, during Charles' visit to the depot, Feb. 25 in Herlong, California. The material is identified, sorted and retrofitted, saving taxpayer dollars. (Photo Credit: Lloyd Gubler) VIEW ORIGINAL
TACOM senior enlisted advisor makes first visit to Sierra Army Depot
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – William Junk, Sierra Army Depot operations officer, shows Command Sgt. Maj. Jerry M. Charles, U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command senior enlisted advisor, part of the depot's process of repairing small arms protective inserts, Feb. 25, during Charles' visit to the depot located in Herlong, California. (Photo Credit: Lloyd Gubler) VIEW ORIGINAL
TACOM senior enlisted advisor makes first visit to Sierra Army Depot
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – William Rowland, Sierra Army Depot division chief, briefs Command Sgt. Maj. Jerry M. Charles, U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command senior enlisted advisor, on the process of refitting water systems for storage and eventual redeployment, during Charles' visit to the depot, Feb. 25 in Herlong, California. (Photo Credit: Lloyd Gubler) VIEW ORIGINAL

HERLONG, California - Sierra Army Depot welcomed U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command's senior enlisted advisor, Feb. 25.

Command Sgt. Maj. Jerry M. Charles assumed responsibility, November 2019, as senior enlisted advisor to Maj. Gen. Daniel G. Mitchell, TACOM commanding general. The visit is part of a wider tour that Charles is taking as he makes initial visits to sites throughout TACOM's area of responsibility. Charles will be primarily focused on quality of life for Soldiers, civilians and families across the command as well as training of noncommissioned officers and Soldiers.

Sierra Army Depot employs approximately 1,500 personnel as it establishes itself as the U.S. Army's end-of-first-life center, resetting retrograde equipment and putting it back into service, saving taxpayer dollars. Charles' Army career began 26 years ago as a 92Y - unit supply specialist. Sierra's sustainment-centric mission is something that Charles is well familiar with.

"Sierra has a huge scope of responsibility in terms of what it does for Army readiness," Charles said. "Employees are enthusiastic about what they do, and committed to the broader purpose of why they do it. Knowing that the end state is serving our sons and daughters."

Charles also recognized several employees with command coins for outstanding performance.

"Being able to recognize employee contributions to Army readiness is great," he said. "It's always a great opportunity to recognize people for their performance and contribution. Purpose is the one factor that gives a different intangible value to the workforce. They know their efforts are effecting a person in uniform as the end user."