ADELPHI, MD -- Researchers at the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command Research Laboratory co-organized a workshop on adversarial robotics at the prestigious Robotics Science and Systems Conference held at Carnegie Mellon Music Hall in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania June 30.

Workshop participants identified and codified the challenges in the emerging area of adversarial robotics and develop secure, resilient and robust robots that operate in adversarial settings.

Robotics researcher, Dr. Christopher Reardon, Research Laboratory, emphasized the importance of researcher involvement the workshops provide.

"When the ARL (Reseach Laboratory) co-organizes workshops with leading researchers at the best conferences in the world, we go far beyond attending and even presenting," Reardon said. "We are able to motivate our problems to those most interested in and capable of solving them in academia and together gain an understanding of what the solutions might look like."

He discussed how collaborating in workshop settings are beneficial to those who participate.

"Our problems are more difficult than academia or even industry," Reardon said. "We benefit by pushing the focus of research toward our more challenging problems, gaining recognition as a serious participant in this space and ensuring other researchers and students are excited about solving these problems with us."

The half-day workshop featured presentations by leading robotics experts, an interactive poster session and an expert panel. Researchers from the Laboratory, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the U.S. Air Force Academy gave presentations on DOD needs and programs in this critical space.

This robotics workshop is the second of its kind to be organized in the last month by ARL researchers.

The Research Laboratory Information Sciences division chief, Dr. Stuart Young, and a team of autonomous systems researchers, conducted a full-day workshop at the flagship IEEE International conference on robotics and automation in Brisbane, Australia.

The workshop, co-organized by lab robotics experts Drs. Ethan Stump and Reardon, along with leading academics and members of the Australia Defence Science and Technology Group, focused on the goal of enabling robots to work as teammates at operational speeds in dynamic and unstructured environments.

World-leading experts presented in areas of vision and perception, learning and adaptation, reasoning and planning, human-agent teaming, simulation for learning, research transition and field robotics experimentation. They reviewed current research results as well as gaps impeding progress to the workshop goal.

Young said the laboratory plans to continue this effort to motivate and define the unsolved problems in artificial intelligence robotics research by engaging academic researchers in future workshops on an evolving series of themes.

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The U.S. Army Research Laboratory is part of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, which has the mission to provide innovative research, development and engineering to produce capabilities that provide decisive overmatch to the Army against the complexities of the current and future operating environments in support of the joint warfighter and the nation. RDECOM is a major subordinate command of the U.S. Army Materiel Command.