DUGWAY PROVING GROUND, Utah -- A leadership team with the Air Resources Laboratory, part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, toured Dugway's Meteorology Division test grids, Nov. 14.

Richard Artz, acting director of the Air Resources Laboratory in Maryland, said the visit was propelled by an interest in "strengthening relationships for future endeavors with Dugway's meteorological division personnel."

Dr. Ariel Stein, a scientist with the team noted that ARL's mission is to conduct research to gain atmospheric dispersion, atmospheric chemistry and climate change in the complex behavior of the environment near the Earth's surface called the boundary layer. It's meteorological research and services aim is a healthy and safe nation.

John Pace, Dugway's meteorological director, arranged a tour of the installations weather tracking capabilities. The tour included a fixed Doppler radar weather station and various collection sites on of number a outdoor test grids.

Pace remarked that the terrain at Dugway offers a variety of elevations that make it ideal for outdoor testing. The protected area varies from salt flats that have no vegetation to pinnacled mountains interspersed that create up and down drafts channeling the evening and early morning air. The air at Dugway is "typically pristine," he added.

"Dugway has a remarkable location with unusual terrain," Artz said. "We are especially interested in seeing how Dugway's environmental data is collected and analyzed. We look forward to a united effort."