Okinawa, Japan -- A new $4.2M, state-of-the-art laboratory will continue to ensure that the services' energy needs are met on the island, as Defense Logistics Agency Energy opened the facility's doors Dec. 8 during a ribbon cutting ceremony at Chibana Compound.

Defense Logistics Agency Energy Pacific at Okinawa, established in March 2013, provides bulk petroleum support to U.S. military and other Department of Defense agencies on the island of Okinawa. The agency's focus is to sustain operational effectiveness of the warfighter while remaining vigilant stewards of the pristine Okinawan environment and to continue to be good ambassadors to our hosts, according to DLA officials.

"The new lab represents a significant fuel support capability on the island for the Department of Defense and our partners throughout the region to maintain on specification fuel quality," said Maj. Andre Bradley, Commander of DLA Energy -- Okinawa. "It will better enable us to fulfill the mission of DLA Energy, which is to provide DoD and other government agencies with comprehensive energy solutions in the most effective and efficient manner possible," he said.

Design on the facility began October, 2012 and construction was completed Nov. 20, 2014 and is one of only three buildings in all of Japan to pass a building air tightness test. The lab includes several innovations, including: Sealed chemical resistant floors that contain spills and affords an easy cleanup along with a new HVAC (heating ventilation and air-conditioning) system that provides 60 tons of cooling with variable air volume control and reheat coils in each room that allow for reduced energy consumption while providing optimal thermal comfort.

"The fact that this team and the contractors were able to pull this thing off in a year, to get it operational, is pretty impressive said DLA Energy Pacific Commander, Navy Capt. Christopher S. Bower. "It's a significant capability for DLA and the warfighter."

The lab will not only keep the Air Force and the Marine Corps in the air by testing turbine fuels JP-5, JP-8, and F-76 diesel fuel marine but will keep the Army, Navy (Military Sealift Command included) and other DoD Activities rolling by conducting fuel analysis in support of exercises in the Pacific Region.

"It was a pleasure being a part of the team that transformed this 30-year-old facility into a modern, top of line, fuel testing laboratory," said DLA Engineer Jerry Vesey.