7th CSC Soldiers road march to maintain proficiency
Army Reserve Soldiers of Charlie Company, 457th Civil Affairs Battalion, 7th Civil Support Command, move out on a frosty morning for a four-mile road march on Oct. 16 at Wiesbaden Army Airfield, Germany. The road march provides Soldiers a means to maintain proficiency on one of their many warrior tasks.

WIESBADEN, Germany -- Soldiers of Charlie Company, 457th Civil Affairs Battalion, 7th Civil Support Command, conducted a road march at Wiesbaden Army Airfield, here, Oct. 16, to maintain proficiency on one of their many warrior tasks. The road march was more than just a motivational event; it was real-life training for the Soldiers.

Maj. Timothy D. Bostwick, the commanding officer of Charlie Co. explained that a civil affairs unit cannot always expect to get access to villages by vehicle in places where roads are not always present. Entering remote villages on foot in an operational environment like Afghanistan also tends to create better opportunities for relationship building with the local populace for the U.S. Army.

"It (foot patrol) is less intimidating," said Bostwick.

"We've got to keep up with the infantry," said Army Pfc. Diamonik M. Hough, a civil affairs specialist with Charlie Company, and native of Berkeley, Calif., explaining that units like his often embed with combat units.

Soldiers of Charlie Co. moved purposefully as a unit and wasted no time covering ground quickly, easily completing the four-mile event, which was scheduled to last two hours, in well under an hour.

Brig. Gen. Mark Hendrix, the commanding general of 7th CSC, along with Command Sgt. Maj. Michael E. Biere, the senior enlisted noncommissioned officer of the 7th CSC, joined the unit for the march.

Hough, a self-proclaimed "Army brat," hopes to use his Army Reserve experience to transfer into the active component of the Army when he earns his sergeant stripes. For Hough, the chance to serve in the Army as a civil affairs specialist and to help the less fortunate was a personal choice that won over an option to join the Peace Corps.

Following the road march, Hendrix and Biere addressed Soldiers' questions at a Town Hall meeting covering various topics like the long-term role of Civil Affairs, training and career development.

"Civil Affairs is expanding," said Hendrix, addressing the Soldiers' concern that the military is looking to reduce force strength.

"There is no time for what is not important," said Hendrix, as he pledged to the Soldiers of Charlie Co. to plan worthwhile training during the Army Reserve annual training event that all Army Reserve Soldiers are obligated to complete.


Hendrix also stressed the need for his Soldiers to focus on their careers and advancement.

"Seek out the difficult jobs and do them well," said Hendrix commenting on his secret to a successful Army career.

Page last updated Mon October 24th, 2011 at 00:00