• Jennifer Scales, DoD Civilian, prepares to shoot during the 50-Bird Skeet Shoot competition held at Fort Stewart's skeet and trap range, Feb. 27. Scales took 1st place in the ladies division.

    Fort Stewart Skeet Shoot

    Jennifer Scales, DoD Civilian, prepares to shoot during the 50-Bird Skeet Shoot competition held at Fort Stewart's skeet and trap range, Feb. 27. Scales took 1st place in the ladies division.

  • Colonel Kevin Milton, Stewart-Hunter garrison commander, prepares to shoot during the 50-Bird Skeet Shoot competition held at Fort Stewart's skeet  and trap range near Holbrook Pond, Feb. 27. The competition is a big hit with hunters, seasoned shooters and those who just want to learn to shoot.

    Fort Stewart skeet shoot

    Colonel Kevin Milton, Stewart-Hunter garrison commander, prepares to shoot during the 50-Bird Skeet Shoot competition held at Fort Stewart's skeet and trap range near Holbrook Pond, Feb. 27. The competition is a big hit with hunters, seasoned shooters...

<b>FORT STEWART, Ga. </b>-Just before the clouds set in to take the temperatures down for the morning, the 2nd annual 50-Bird Skeet shoot was underway at the Fort Stewart Skeet Range near Holbrook Pond, Feb. 27.

The drop in temp did not deteriorate the shooters from taking aim and firing their rounds at the small frisbee-shaped disks, known as birds, whizzing through the air at lightening quick speed. Regardless of how fast the birds flew, many of them were clipped from the front, side, or the rear, which is really the objective of skeet shooting.

In the mix for the day, shooters aiming their various gauged weapons included Col. Kevin Milton, Fort Stewart-Hunter Army Airfield Garrison Commander; Chap. (Lt. Col) Curtis Prewitt, 3rd Sustainment Brigade-rear chaplain; members of both the Marne Trap and Skeet Club from Stewart and the Mossy Oaks Gun Club from Hunter; other Soldiers, civilians, youth, and retirees.

Even though many things operate smoothly in the garrison, leaders still need ways to unwind and just have some fun. "I like to shoot any chance I get," said Col. Milton. Pig, deer, dove, even the most recent pheasant shoot have been in the barrel sights of Col. Milton when he got a chance to come out and relax and enjoy the camaraderie.

The 3rd Sustainment Brigade-rear chaplain enjoys the sport also. "I may come out once a week," said Chap. Prewitt. "This is a sport for all ages."

Gary Hadden, an employee of Slone Construction Company on Stewart and president of the Marne Skeet Club, agrees with both Col. Milton and Lt. Col. Prewitt. "This is a sport where a person, no matter what their age, can develop self-confidence. The more you practice, the better you become."

Hadden also added that you can't beat the price either. "MWR (Morale, Welfare, and Recreation) has kept the prices low," said Hadden. "You can either take your Family of four to the movies for about $65, or bring them out to the range for about $40. Plus, it gets the kids off the couch."

There are different types of people who come out for the sport, said Robert Ackman, retired Army. "You will find the avid trap and skeet shooter, regular hunters, bird hunters, shotgun shooters, and those who want to learn. If you can hold a shotgun, you can shoot skeet," he said.

Just ask Ryan and Gavin McGowan, who won in the youth shooting and have only been shooting for about six months.

Mike Moore, MWR shooting sports manager, invites everyone to come out and take advantage of the range. The range is open every Thursday and Saturday. Members of the Marne Skeet Club open the range 10 a.m. on Sundays for those who want to practice also. For more information, call Moore at 435-8219 or 435-8061.

The next skeet shoot is scheduled in 60 days, so by that time, everyone could have saved up their $20 entrance fee, plus have come out to the range to get some practice.

Page last updated Thu March 4th, 2010 at 15:34