• SGT Jacob Kleinert strides under the crossed swords to become an Army Noncommissioned officer during an induction ceremony in Grafenwoehr, Germany.

    JMTC Welcomes New NCOs

    SGT Jacob Kleinert strides under the crossed swords to become an Army Noncommissioned officer during an induction ceremony in Grafenwoehr, Germany.

  • 1st Sgt. Robert Haynes congratulates and welcomes three inductees into the ranks of the Noncommissioned officer during the Joint Multinational Training Command's NCO Induction Ceremony in Grafenwoehr, Germany.  Left to right: Sgt. Edward Hursh, Sgt. Joseph Kleinert, Sgt. Shaneequah Simpkins.

    JMTC Welcomes Newest NCOs

    1st Sgt. Robert Haynes congratulates and welcomes three inductees into the ranks of the Noncommissioned officer during the Joint Multinational Training Command's NCO Induction Ceremony in Grafenwoehr, Germany. Left to right: Sgt. Edward Hursh, Sgt...

(GRAFENWOEHR, Germany, June 3, 2009) - Three soldiers from the 7th U.S. Army Joint Multinational Training Command (JMTC), Sgt. Shaneequah Simpkins, Sgt. Edward Hursh and Sgt. Jacob Kleinert were inducted into the Noncommissioned Officer Corps, May 15, 2009, during a ceremony at the east camp field house in Grafenwoehr, Germany.

The ceremony began with a welcome and invocation by Master Sgt. (Chaplain) Michael Cavalier, then an address by Sgt. Major Michael Kennedy of the JMTC's Training Directorate, and guest speaker for the ceremony,

"The NCO Induction Ceremony is a time-honored rite of passage," said Kennedy. "There are no streets named after NCOs, no place names, or monuments to remind the American citizen of the great NCOs who defend our nation. Instead, the legacy of U.S. Army NCOs stands in the ranks of succeeding generations of America's Soldiers."

It's the culmination of about 233 years of NCOs quietly at work, one generation of soldiers building successively on the experience of those that came before - demonstrated experience, competence, ability and leadership, explained Kennedy in his speech.

The Soldiers passed beneath two crossed swords high above their heads, spoke the sacred NCO Creed, and stood at attention as senior enlisted personnel officially welcomed them into the Corps.

"After my enlistment, I quickly noticed that one thing NCO's share is a tendency towards good judgment - using common sense and thinking ahead, being adaptable and aware of the needs and difficulties of others. It just seemed natural to me that I would want to join people with these qualities and become an NCO," said Kleinert, who currently serves as the Commanding General's driver.

"Becoming an NCO was a natural progression in my career as a soldier. I place a great deal of emphasis on getting things done, doing things right the first time, and stepping up to responsibility."

There are plenty of good Soldiers in Grafenwoehr, but that formation on that particular afternoon knew they were a cut above.

"No one is more professional than I," they harmoniously declared.

Page last updated Thu June 4th, 2009 at 03:22