Enhancing International Security Assistance Force Preparation

Friday May 14, 2010

What is it?

In Afghanistan, relevant and current information impacts the decision-making process on the ground. With 45 International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) troop-contributing nations (TCN), the much-needed information resides on nine recognized networks, often with national restrictions. To overcome these obstacles, the Afghan Mission Network (AMN) was created to foster collaboration and information sharing by all ISAF TCNs. The U.S. AMN segment, CENTRIX-ISAF (CX-I), is scheduled for June 2010 implementation.

Identifying this communication challenge, recently the 7th U.S. Army Joint Multinational Training Command (JMTC) replicated the AMN, during the 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team (2SBCT) Mission Readiness Exercise in Hohenfels, Germany. This systems integration was the first of its kind, and successfully replicated CX-I data, which will greatly enhance the units understanding of the operational environment, and greatly increase effective unit reporting in Theater.

What has the Army done?

In collaboration with the Program Executive Office Command Control and Communications Tactical, Program Executive Officer, Intelligence, Electronic Warfare and Sensors, 5th Signal Command, and the Army's Chief Information Officer G6, JMTC applied digital hardware and software to replicate the AMN, enhancing both U.S. and future multinational ISAF mission support training in Germany. The extended network allows Brigade Combat Teams (BCTs) to prepare for deployment. The training enabler demonstrates how the JMTC synchronizes live, virtual, and constructive technology for a true "train as you fight" experience for U.S. and multinationals, company-level through BCT-level systems.

What continued efforts does the Army have planned for the future?

On-going mission support to ISAF comes from 45 different TCN. Each nation must receive comparable training to guarantee mission success. Through current partnership opportunities, the JMTC has the expertise and training available to ensure U.S. forces and TCNs are prepared for missions supporting operations in Afghanistan. The training experience provides a venue to increase the trust and interoperability required to accomplish ISAF initiatives in Afghanistan.

Why is this important to the Army?

U.S. forces serve as part of multinational operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. Replicating the real-world environment is important when preparing for real-world missions. The JMTC has live, virtual and constructive training for Soldiers and units, while continuing to build partner capacity for the current mission, and future global security challenges.

Resources:

NATO News Release: Improved information-sharing to boost NATO Afghanistan mission

Joint Multinational Training Command (JMTC)

Joint Multinational Readiness Center

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May 2010

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