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Civilian Aides to the Secretary of the Army

America's link to the Army!

Introduction

Civilian Aides to the Secretary of the Army (CASAs) are business and community leaders appointed by the Secretary to advise and support Army leaders across the country. CASAs come from many professions including business, education, finance, industry, law, the media, medicine and public service. Each is proactively involved in the community and brings to the position an interest in the Army, a high degree of business and civic leadership and an ability to influence the public. CASAs are Special Government Employees who agree to serve as representatives of the Secretary of the Army without salary, wages or related benefits, and are afforded a 3-star protocol status. Each CASA is committed to supporting all Department of Army Civilians, Soldiers and their Families. In particular, CASAs partner with the Soldier for Life program to assist Soldiers as they transition from the Army.

FAQs

  • Civilian Aides to the Secretary of the Army (CASA) are essential to the Army’s ability to connect with America by helping to build partnerships and strengthening relationships in their communities. The role of a CASA varies greatly based on geographic location; proximity to Army installations or activities and support of local recruiting brigades of battalions. Some of the common roles the CASAs play are below:
  • Recruiting is the #1 priority for CASAs. They support the Total Army Recruiting mission by using their community connections to link the Army to influencers within the community. CASAs support: Prospect Campaigns. Prospect campaigns are activities that ensure authentic access to high schools, trade schools, community colleges, colleges universities, pre-med, healthcare professional career schools and similar settings. Awareness Campaigns. Support activities that will reach the general public through participation in public activities such as parades, fairs, festivals, community celebrations, military open-house functions, job fairs, and public meetings. Tell the Army Story. Using media access and community engagement, CASAs facilitate meaningful interactions between Army recruiters, key influencers, and youth with a propensity to serve. CASAs are America's link to the Army! 
  • Each component faces unique challenges, and as leaders in their states or territories, CASAs play a unique role by being the Secretary’s link to the Guard and Reserve.  In particular, CASAs in states with little to no Active-Duty presence are almost exclusively involved with National Guard and Army Reserve Soldiers. CASAs typically develop strong relationships with The Adjutant General (TAG) and reserve units since local need varies greatly.
  • CASAs support our Soldiers and their Families as they transition out of uniform by partnering with the Soldier for Life program. This includes taking care of the Soldier’s Families and assisting with job opportunities for transition Soldiers, veterans and their spouses.
  • In keeping with the Army People strategy, “Our people are our greatest strength and our most important weapon system” CASAs should seek to build mutually beneficial relationships within all segments of the multicultural communities they serve. They should also seek opportunities to upskill their cultural agility and exposure as they assist our Army in building lasting community-based relationships within their assigned regions of responsibility.
  • CASAs are often asked to speak at similar events listed above, as well as military and veteran services organization events. These events provide an opportunity to disseminate information about the Army and its priorities. The CASA Program Office regularly distributes Army talking points, top line messages, the Secretary’s priorities, and other pertinent information. However, most information can easily be found online or through your local Army contacts.
  • CASAs use their extensive outreach to support Soldiers and civilians while they serve. As the eyes and ears in the community, CASAs keep a pulse of the Total Army and provide genuine feedback on Army decisions and actions that affect Soldiers and families.

Find a CASA

Click below to find the CASA for your geographic location.

Find A CASA

  • North - Albert J. Fitzgerald South - Michael D. Schmitz
  • North - Timothy A. Jones South - Kevin L.  Robinson
  • Territory-Wide - J. Toloa'i Ho Ching
  • North - Mario E. Diaz North - P. Lynn Londen South - Ben Coronado South - Linda L. Denno
  • North - G. Brynt Parmeter South - Ronald S. Chastain
  • Central - Lorenzo Parra Rios Coastal-South - M. Janet Chin Greater Los Angeles - Mario A. Guerra Los Angeles - Sonki Hong Pacific North Sierras - Gilbert W. Sanborn Sacramento - Lance T. Izumi Sacramento - Charles L. Pattillo San Francisco - Mark K. Benton South - Vacant Southeast - Bridget A. Blehm
  • North - William H. Hanzlik North - Vacant South - Terrance D. McWilliams
  • Territory-Wide - Michael Sablan
  • Statewide - John C.  Stull
  • Statewide - Terry L. Wiley
  • District Wide - L. Anita Dixon
  • Central - Allie L. Braswell Central - Landy D. Dunham Northeast - James D.  Tyre North - Dr. Peter Tan South - Jeraline M. Johnson South - Victor S. Olshansky Tampa Bay - Luis Martinez-Monfort
  • Coastal Region - William L. Cathcart North - P. Ken Keen North - John W. Phillips West - John T. Hargrove
  • Territory Wide - Noel Molina Enriquez
  • Island of Hawaii - D. Noelani Kalipi Oahu East - Gilbert K.T. Tam
  • Statewide - Thomas E. Shuler
  • North - James A. Bland North - Steven N. Herman South - John W. Moulton West - Sam H. Kupresin
  • Statewide - Stan D. Soderstrom
  • East - C. Dana Waterman
  • East - Michael D. Hockley Greater Kansas City - Patrick C. Warren Stateside - D. Scott Stuckey
  • North - James T. Iacocca West - Kelli N. Pendleton
  • North - Rodney A. Ellis South - Charles L. Rice
  • Statewide - Brenda M. Pennels
  • Central - Guy L. Filippelli South - Bobby G. Henry Statewide - Mary Jane Jernigan
  • Statewide - Brian P. Concannon Statewide - Nicole R. Gilmore
  • Statewide - Tammy J. Carnrike
  • Statewide - Eric D.  Ahlness Statewide - Donald Mark Ritchie
  • Statewide - A. Leon Collins
  • East - E. Tracy Beckette West - Keith W. Pritchard
  • Vacant
  • Statewide - James A. Cada
  • Vacant
  • Statewide - Peter S. Burdett
  • North - Richard W. Eastman Statewide - Erica Jeffries Purdo
  • North - Jeffrey N. Younggren Statewide - Richard M. Jackson
  • Midstate - Elizabeth G. Kubala North - Joseph M. Butler South - Steven A.  Castleton South - Dr. Pamela J. Newman
  • East - Danny D. Dederick West - Mabry E. Martin West - Blair D. Shwedo
  • Statewide - Shelly Sizer
  • Central - Susan K. Green North - Babe D. Kwasniak North - Eric S.  Mansfield South - Stephen R. Lee
  • North - Jill A. Castilla North - Kevin Offel South - Michael B. Brown
  • Statewide - Craig A. Wilhelm
  • Central - Vacant East - Doc Parghi East - Kenneth  Wong West - Rory A. Cooper West - Paul M. Urban
  • Territory-Wide Luis A. Soto
  • Statewide - Laurie Ludovici
  • Statewide - Kevin A. Shwedo
  • Statewide - Ray Carpenter
  • North - J. Phil Harpel South - Ralph Schulz
  • Brazos Valley - Daniel J. Pugh Capital Region - Abdul B. Subhani East - Timothy L. Kopra East - Myrna Saldana-Trevino North - Darcy G. Anderson North - Joseph M. DePinto South - Joseph D. Bray West - Gus J. Rodriguez
  • Statewide - Jennie A. Taylor
  • Statewide - Michael Popowski 
  • Territory-Wide - Beresford F. Edwards
  • North - Shawn N. Olds South - Michael P. Flanagan
  • East - Vacant West - Tay Yoshitani West - David A. Zeeck
  • Statewide - Kenneth D. Boggs
  • Statewide - Marcia M. Anderson
  • Statewide - Mark W. Johnson

REGULATIONS

Army Regulation 1-15 - January 31, 2017 [PDF - 207.7 KB] CASA Overview [PDF - 145 KB] Typical Duties of a CASA - June 7, 2021 [PDF - 265.2 KB]

INSTRUCTIONS

CASA Nomination and Selection Process [PDF - 12 KB]

History

Just before World War I, the Military Training Camps Association (MTCA), a private group, began a training program to train leaders for the Army. In helping the Army select and train candidates for what was to become known as the Plattsburgh Camps, the MTCA suggested that an inner group of "Civilian Aides to the Secretary of War" could benefit both the Army and the Association. In 1922, the Army formally recognized the training program and the Civilian Aide concept. Interaction with the Army was broad; with specific duties left to each Aide's own discretion. Then, as now, Aides served without pay or compensation. In 1950, Secretary of the Army Frank Pace, Jr. redesigned the program to meet the Army's growing need for contact with grass roots opinion throughout the country. Secretary Pace also changed the policy of selecting Civilian Aides solely from the ranks of the MTCA and reduced their terms to two years. The Aides' primary mission has become promoting good relations between the Army and the public by acting as spokespersons and advisors. Since its reorganization in the early 1950s, the program has undergone few changes. Since 1950, more than 500 persons have served as Civilian Aides.

About Us

Civilian Aides to the Secretary of the Army (CASAs) are business and community leaders appointed by the Secretary to advise and support Army leaders across the country. CASAs come from many professions including business, education, finance, industry, law, the media, medicine and public service. Each is proactively involved in the community and brings to the position an interest in the Army, a high degree of business and civic leadership and an ability to influence the public. CASAs are Special Government Employees who agree to serve as representatives of the Secretary of the Army without salary, wages or related benefits, and are afforded a 3-star protocol status. CASAs bridge the gap between the Army and civilian community by disseminating information about the Army's objectives and major programs to the public through speeches, personal contact and participation in Army and community events. CASAs assist with recruiting by increasing the positive image of the Army and connecting Army recruiters to key influencers in the community. CASAs provide individual advice to the Secretary of the Army on public sentiments toward the Army. CASAs work closely with Army leaders and installation commanders and serve as the Secretary' s liaison for Army National Guard and Army Reserve matters. They also engage with local, regional, and state officials, Federal Agencies, Members of Congress and their staff. Each CASA is committed to supporting all Department of Army Civilians, Soldiers and their Families. In particular, CASAs partner with the Soldier for Life program to assist Soldiers as they transition from the Army.

Appointee Criteria

To serve as a Civilian Aide to the Secretary of the Army, the appointee: Is a United States citizen of outstanding character, integrity, and patriotism. Has a deep interest in military affairs. Is a leader in community affairs. Is in a position to disseminate information about the Army to a broad cross section of the public and to other prominent citizens in his or her area. Is able to interpret and affect public attitude toward the Army. Is able and willing to devote a reasonable amount of time to the activities of a Civilian Aide. Will reside in the State or Territory the Civilian Aide is appointed to represent. Will not be an employee of the Department of Defense as defined in 5 U.S.C. § 2105. Will not be an active member of the National Guard or a member of the Ready Reserve (Selected), Individual Ready Reserve, or Standby Reserve. Will not be a paid employee of any political party. Will not be a Federal, state, or local elected or appointed official or employee, if such position would present a conflict of interest. Will not hold financial interests or positions that conflict with the performance of his or her duties as a Civilian Aide. For the purposes of analyzing whether a nominee holds an interest, the interests of the nominee's spouse and dependent children are attributed to the nominee.

Partnerships

The United States of America Vietnam War Commemoration On 15 April, 2014, CASA became a commemorative partner in the United States of America Vietnam War Commemoration Partner Program which is designed for federal, state and local communities, veterans' organizations and other nongovernmental organizations to assist a grateful nation in thanking and honoring our Vietnam Veterans and their families. Commemorative Partners are encouraged to participate in the Commemoration of the Vietnam War by planning and conducting events and activities that will recognize the Vietnam Veterans and their families' service, valor and sacrifice. Read the President's Proclamation of the Commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War (pdf). Read the Thank You Letter to CASA from the Office of the Secretary of Defense (pdf). Commemoration Objectives To thank and honor veterans of the Vietnam War, including personnel who were held as prisoners of war or listed as missing in action, for their esrvice and sacrifice on behalf of the United States and to thank and honor the families of these veterans. To highlight the service of the Armed Forces during the Vietnam War and the contributions of Federal agencies and governmental and non-governmental organizations that served with, or in support of, the Armed Forces. To pay tribute to the contributions made on the home front by the people of the United States during the Vietnam War. To highlight the advances in technology, science, and medicine related to military research conducted during the Vietnam War. To recognize the contributions and sacrifices made by the allies of the United States during the Vietnam War. View Objectives Poster (pdf) CASA Vietnam War Commemoration Activities Kentucky (North) September 2014 - Jerry Cecil, CASA for Kentucky (North), helps kick off Kentucky's 10-year effort to honor Vietnam veterans. Read Article War Commemoration SITREPs - 2015 Issue 6, Thursday, June 18 (pdf)