The Last Doughboy

By Elizabeth M. LorgeMarch 7, 2008

Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, left, talks with Frank Buckles, 107, the last known living American World War I veteran, during a Pentagon ceremony March 6. Buckles was honored during the ceremony, which included the unveiling an exhibit of veterans' portraits by photographer David DeJonge.
1 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, left, talks with Frank Buckles, 107, the last known living American World War I veteran, during a Pentagon ceremony March 6. Buckles was honored during the ceremony, which included the unveiling an exhibit of veterans' portraits by photographer David DeJonge. (Photo Credit: R. D. Ward) VIEW ORIGINAL
Cpl. Frank Buckles' unit, the First Fort Riley Casual Detachment, before leaving for Europe in 1917.
2 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Cpl. Frank Buckles' unit, the First Fort Riley Casual Detachment, before leaving for Europe in 1917. (Photo Credit: Courtesy of Frank Buckles and the Library of Congress' Veteran's History Project) VIEW ORIGINAL
Secretary of Defense Robert Gates addresses the audience during the World War I portrait-exhibit dedication at the Pentagon, March 6. Seated, from left to right, are: Secretary of the Army Pete Geren, photographer David DeJonge and the last American World War I veteran Frank Buckles. Portraits of other World War I veterans hang in the background.
3 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Secretary of Defense Robert Gates addresses the audience during the World War I portrait-exhibit dedication at the Pentagon, March 6. Seated, from left to right, are: Secretary of the Army Pete Geren, photographer David DeJonge and the last American World War I veteran Frank Buckles. Portraits of other World War I veterans hang in the background. (Photo Credit: Elizabeth M. Lorge) VIEW ORIGINAL
Cpl. Frank Buckles on his way to a reception for Gen. John Pershing in Oklahoma City in 1920. The commander of American forces during World War I and Buckles discussed their home state of Missouri.
4 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Cpl. Frank Buckles on his way to a reception for Gen. John Pershing in Oklahoma City in 1920. The commander of American forces during World War I and Buckles discussed their home state of Missouri. (Photo Credit: Courtesy of Frank Buckles and the Library of Congress' Veteran's History Project) VIEW ORIGINAL
Two honor-guard Soldiers help unveil David DeJonge's portrait of Frank Buckles, the last American World War I veteran during a Pentagon ceremony March 6. Nine portraits of World War I veterans, including Buckles, will remain on permanent display at the Pentagon. Buckles is seated as DeJonge and Secretary of the Army Pete Geren (right) look on.
5 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Two honor-guard Soldiers help unveil David DeJonge's portrait of Frank Buckles, the last American World War I veteran during a Pentagon ceremony March 6. Nine portraits of World War I veterans, including Buckles, will remain on permanent display at the Pentagon. Buckles is seated as DeJonge and Secretary of the Army Pete Geren (right) look on. (Photo Credit: Elizabeth M. Lorge) VIEW ORIGINAL
Photographer David DeJonge (left) and Frank Buckles look through DeJonge's portraits of World War I veterans, unveiled at the Pentagon Thursday.
6 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Photographer David DeJonge (left) and Frank Buckles look through DeJonge's portraits of World War I veterans, unveiled at the Pentagon Thursday. (Photo Credit: Elizabeth M. Lorge) VIEW ORIGINAL
Frank Buckles in his home in West Virginia. He holds the meal cup he used for three years and two months at a Japanese prison camp in the Philippines during World War II.
7 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Frank Buckles in his home in West Virginia. He holds the meal cup he used for three years and two months at a Japanese prison camp in the Philippines during World War II. (Photo Credit: Elizabeth M. Lorge) VIEW ORIGINAL
Cpl. Frank Buckles, shortly after he arrived in Winchester, England, on his way to France in 1917.
8 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Cpl. Frank Buckles, shortly after he arrived in Winchester, England, on his way to France in 1917. (Photo Credit: Courtesy of Frank Buckles and the Library of CongressAca,!a,,c VeteranAca,!a,,cs History Project) VIEW ORIGINAL
The American flag and Prisoner of War flag are visible just over a hill on Frank Buckles’ farm in West Virginia. In addition to serving in the U.S. Army during World War I, he was a civilian prisoner of war of the Japanese in the Philippines in World War II.
9 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The American flag and Prisoner of War flag are visible just over a hill on Frank Buckles’ farm in West Virginia. In addition to serving in the U.S. Army during World War I, he was a civilian prisoner of war of the Japanese in the Philippines in World War II. (Photo Credit: Elizabeth M. Lorge) VIEW ORIGINAL