Jumping into Alaska's Malamute Drop Zone

By Staff Sgt. Matthew Winstead (US Army Alaska Public Affairs)February 28, 2012

Sgt. 1st Class Donshay Morning, 84th Engineer Support Company, checks the wind speed shortly before a jump at Malamute Drop Zone on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. Winds of less than 13 knots are needed to safely execute an airborne mission. If conditions on the drop zone are deemed unsafe, Morning will signal to the pilot by one of several predetermined methods to suspend or cancel the mission.
1 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Sgt. 1st Class Donshay Morning, 84th Engineer Support Company, checks the wind speed shortly before a jump at Malamute Drop Zone on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. Winds of less than 13 knots are needed to safely execute an airborne mission. If conditions on the drop zone are deemed unsafe, Morning will signal to the pilot by one of several predetermined methods to suspend or cancel the mission. (Photo Credit: Staff Sgt. Matthew Winstead (US Army Alaska Public Affairs)) VIEW ORIGINAL
Paratroopers descend to Malamute Drop Zone on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, after performing an exit technique called the "mass exit", with aircraft in a trail formation. While relatively close together on the descent, jumpers are trained to maintain a minimum safe distance in the air of 25 feet while jumping with a T-10 Delta parachute.
2 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Paratroopers descend to Malamute Drop Zone on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, after performing an exit technique called the "mass exit", with aircraft in a trail formation. While relatively close together on the descent, jumpers are trained to maintain a minimum safe distance in the air of 25 feet while jumping with a T-10 Delta parachute. (Photo Credit: Staff Sgt. Matthew Winstead (US Army Alaska Public Affairs)) VIEW ORIGINAL
A paratrooper lands in the snow on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska's Malamute Drop Zone. The execution of a safe and fluid parachute landing fall is essential to a successful airborne mission. The parachute landing fall technique is designed to safely distribute the impact over five points of contact on the jumper's body. Standing landings, even in deep snow, are never authorized.
3 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A paratrooper lands in the snow on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska's Malamute Drop Zone. The execution of a safe and fluid parachute landing fall is essential to a successful airborne mission. The parachute landing fall technique is designed to safely distribute the impact over five points of contact on the jumper's body. Standing landings, even in deep snow, are never authorized. (Photo Credit: Staff Sgt. Matthew E. Winstead (US Army Alaska Public Affairs)) VIEW ORIGINAL
A drop zone safety officer and assistant DZSO set up a raised angle marker at Malamute Drop Zone on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. The marker helps pilots to visually confirm the location of the drop and the direction of their approach.
4 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A drop zone safety officer and assistant DZSO set up a raised angle marker at Malamute Drop Zone on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. The marker helps pilots to visually confirm the location of the drop and the direction of their approach. (Photo Credit: Staff Sgt. Matthew E. Winstead (US Army Alaska Public Affairs)) VIEW ORIGINAL