Massive Construction, Renovation Project Preserves History, Tradition - From Roof Lines to Floor Til

By Jim Hinnant, U.S. Army Forces Command Public AffairsSeptember 3, 2010

Mansards, a roofing technique dating to the 1700's, are being installed on the U.S. Army Forces Command and U.S. Army Reserve Command Combined Headquarters Building.  This May 27, 2010 photo shows workers placing distinctive rust red-colored tiles that will echo the style of architecture prevalent at the historic Main Post area of Fort Bragg, N.C. From new roof lines to historic windows and floor tile, supporting contract firms and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are taking appropriate measures to maintain the historic symbolism, aesthetics and atmosphere that have always been an important part of living and working on the Fort Bragg cantonment.
1 / 7 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Mansards, a roofing technique dating to the 1700's, are being installed on the U.S. Army Forces Command and U.S. Army Reserve Command Combined Headquarters Building. This May 27, 2010 photo shows workers placing distinctive rust red-colored tiles that will echo the style of architecture prevalent at the historic Main Post area of Fort Bragg, N.C. From new roof lines to historic windows and floor tile, supporting contract firms and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are taking appropriate measures to maintain the historic symbolism, aesthetics and atmosphere that have always been an important part of living and working on the Fort Bragg cantonment. (Photo Credit: Jim Hinnant, U.S. Army Forces Command Public Affairs) VIEW ORIGINAL
Finish painters with Wish and Wash Painting Co., of Laurinburg, N.C. apply fresh paint to the trim of the original windows of the historic Firestone Building, Sept. 1, 2010.  The building, which over the years served as an auto repair shop under various concessionaires, is now undergoing renovation to serve as temporary work space to support the relocation of the headquarters elements of U.S. Army Forces Command and U.S. Reserve Command from Fort McPherson, Ga., to Fort Bragg, N.C. Working closely  with the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office, the U.S. Army and supporting contract firms are taking  necessary measures  to preserve the historic nature of the building.
2 / 7 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Finish painters with Wish and Wash Painting Co., of Laurinburg, N.C. apply fresh paint to the trim of the original windows of the historic Firestone Building, Sept. 1, 2010. The building, which over the years served as an auto repair shop under various concessionaires, is now undergoing renovation to serve as temporary work space to support the relocation of the headquarters elements of U.S. Army Forces Command and U.S. Reserve Command from Fort McPherson, Ga., to Fort Bragg, N.C. Working closely with the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office, the U.S. Army and supporting contract firms are taking necessary measures to preserve the historic nature of the building. (Photo Credit: Jim Hinnant, U.S. Army Forces Command Public Affairs) VIEW ORIGINAL
Michael Locklear, of Pembroke, N.C., a finish painter with Wish and Wash Painting Co. of Laurinburg, N.C., carefully "cuts in" the frame of an original window of the historic Firestone Building, Sept. 1, 2010. The building, which over the years served as an auto repair shop under various concessionaires, is now undergoing renovation to serve as temporary work space to support the relocation of the headquarters elements of U.S. Army Forces Command and U.S. Reserve Command from Fort McPherson, Ga., to Fort Bragg, N.C. Working closely  with the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office, the U.S. Army and supporting contract firms are taking  necessary measures  to preserve the historic nature of the building.
3 / 7 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Michael Locklear, of Pembroke, N.C., a finish painter with Wish and Wash Painting Co. of Laurinburg, N.C., carefully "cuts in" the frame of an original window of the historic Firestone Building, Sept. 1, 2010. The building, which over the years served as an auto repair shop under various concessionaires, is now undergoing renovation to serve as temporary work space to support the relocation of the headquarters elements of U.S. Army Forces Command and U.S. Reserve Command from Fort McPherson, Ga., to Fort Bragg, N.C. Working closely with the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office, the U.S. Army and supporting contract firms are taking necessary measures to preserve the historic nature of the building. (Photo Credit: Jim Hinnant, U.S. Army Forces Command Public Affairs) VIEW ORIGINAL
Frank Smith, of Pembroke, N.C., a finish painter with Wish and Wash Painting Co. of Laurinburg, N.C., carefully "cuts in" the frame of an original window of the historic Firestone Building, Sept. 1, 2010. The building, which over the years served as an auto repair shop under various concessionaires, is now undergoing renovation to serve as temporary work space to support the relocation of the headquarters elements of U.S. Army Forces Command and U.S. Reserve Command from Fort McPherson, Ga., to Fort Bragg, N.C. Working closely  with the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office, the U.S. Army and supporting contract firms are taking  necessary measures  to preserve the historic nature of the building.
4 / 7 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Frank Smith, of Pembroke, N.C., a finish painter with Wish and Wash Painting Co. of Laurinburg, N.C., carefully "cuts in" the frame of an original window of the historic Firestone Building, Sept. 1, 2010. The building, which over the years served as an auto repair shop under various concessionaires, is now undergoing renovation to serve as temporary work space to support the relocation of the headquarters elements of U.S. Army Forces Command and U.S. Reserve Command from Fort McPherson, Ga., to Fort Bragg, N.C. Working closely with the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office, the U.S. Army and supporting contract firms are taking necessary measures to preserve the historic nature of the building. (Photo Credit: Jim Hinnant, U.S. Army Forces Command Public Affairs) VIEW ORIGINAL
To maintain the traditional look of the historic Main Post area of Fort Bragg, N.C., and to preserve the original appearance and original materials of historic buildings under renovation; new construction and remodeling being done to facilitate the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure-directed relocation of the headquarters of U.S. Army Forces Command and U.S. Army Reserve Command to Fort Bragg has been closely coordinated with the N.C. State Historical Preservation Office.   From new roof lines to historic windows and floor tiles like the ones in this photo, supporting contract firms and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are taking appropriate measures to maintain the historic symbolism, aesthetics and atmosphere that have always been an important part of living and working on the Fort Bragg cantonment.
5 / 7 Show Caption + Hide Caption – To maintain the traditional look of the historic Main Post area of Fort Bragg, N.C., and to preserve the original appearance and original materials of historic buildings under renovation; new construction and remodeling being done to facilitate the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure-directed relocation of the headquarters of U.S. Army Forces Command and U.S. Army Reserve Command to Fort Bragg has been closely coordinated with the N.C. State Historical Preservation Office. From new roof lines to historic windows and floor tiles like the ones in this photo, supporting contract firms and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are taking appropriate measures to maintain the historic symbolism, aesthetics and atmosphere that have always been an important part of living and working on the Fort Bragg cantonment. (Photo Credit: Jim Hinnant, U.S. Army Forces Command Public Affairs) VIEW ORIGINAL
The Firestone Building, shown in this Feb. 24, 2010, photo, served as an auto repair shop under various concessionaires over the years and now is undergoing renovation to serve as temporary work space to support the relocation of the headquarters elements of U.S. Army Forces Command and U.S. Reserve Command from Fort McPherson, Ga., to Fort Bragg, N.C.  Working closely with the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office, the U.S. Army and supporting contract firms are taking necessary measures to preserve the historic nature of the building.
6 / 7 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The Firestone Building, shown in this Feb. 24, 2010, photo, served as an auto repair shop under various concessionaires over the years and now is undergoing renovation to serve as temporary work space to support the relocation of the headquarters elements of U.S. Army Forces Command and U.S. Reserve Command from Fort McPherson, Ga., to Fort Bragg, N.C. Working closely with the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office, the U.S. Army and supporting contract firms are taking necessary measures to preserve the historic nature of the building. (Photo Credit: Jim Hinnant, U.S. Army Forces Command Public Affairs) VIEW ORIGINAL
To maintain the traditional look of the historic Main Post area of Fort Bragg, N.C., and to preserve the original appearance and original materials of historic buildings under renovation; new construction and remodeling being done to facilitate the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure-directed relocation of the headquarters of U.S. Army Forces Command and U.S. Army Reserve Command to Fort Bragg has been closely coordinated with the N.C. State Historical Preservation Office.   From new roof lines to historic windows and floor tile, supporting contract firms and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are taking appropriate measures to maintain the historic symbolism, aesthetics and atmosphere that have always been an important part of living and working on the Fort Bragg cantonment.
7 / 7 Show Caption + Hide Caption – To maintain the traditional look of the historic Main Post area of Fort Bragg, N.C., and to preserve the original appearance and original materials of historic buildings under renovation; new construction and remodeling being done to facilitate the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure-directed relocation of the headquarters of U.S. Army Forces Command and U.S. Army Reserve Command to Fort Bragg has been closely coordinated with the N.C. State Historical Preservation Office. From new roof lines to historic windows and floor tile, supporting contract firms and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are taking appropriate measures to maintain the historic symbolism, aesthetics and atmosphere that have always been an important part of living and working on the Fort Bragg cantonment. (Photo Credit: Jim Hinnant, U.S. Army Forces Command Public Affairs) VIEW ORIGINAL