Fort Benning paratroopers make first jump using T-11

By Ms. Brenda Donnell (USACR/Safety Center)March 17, 2010

Airborne School instructor Staff Sgt. Christopher Wheaton gathers his T-11 parachute after being dropped from a C-130 March 16, at Fryar Drop Zone on Fort Benning, Ga. The T-11 is the newest parachute in the Army's inventory replacing the decades old T-10 parachute.
1 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Airborne School instructor Staff Sgt. Christopher Wheaton gathers his T-11 parachute after being dropped from a C-130 March 16, at Fryar Drop Zone on Fort Benning, Ga. The T-11 is the newest parachute in the Army's inventory replacing the decades old T-10 parachute. (Photo Credit: Brenda Donnell) VIEW ORIGINAL
Paratroopers using the Army's new T-11 parachute exit a C-130 March 16, at Fryar Field on Fort Benning, Ga. This was the first jump for Airborne students using the Army's new parachute.
2 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Paratroopers using the Army's new T-11 parachute exit a C-130 March 16, at Fryar Field on Fort Benning, Ga. This was the first jump for Airborne students using the Army's new parachute. (Photo Credit: Ms. Brenda Donnell (USACR/Safety Center)) VIEW ORIGINAL
A paratrooper using the T-11 parachute lands March 16 at Fryar Drop Zone on Fort Benning, Ga. The 52-pound T-11 reduces a paratrooper's landing impact by 49 percent, which is expected to significantly reduce jump-related injuries.
3 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A paratrooper using the T-11 parachute lands March 16 at Fryar Drop Zone on Fort Benning, Ga. The 52-pound T-11 reduces a paratrooper's landing impact by 49 percent, which is expected to significantly reduce jump-related injuries. (Photo Credit: Ms. Brenda Donnell (USACR/Safety Center)) VIEW ORIGINAL
A paratrooper using the Army's new T-11 parachute comes in for his landing March 16 at Fryar Drop Zone on Fort Benning, Ga. The T-11 is designed for the modern warfighter whose average combat load has increased to more than 400 pounds compared to earlier loads of about 300 pounds.
4 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A paratrooper using the Army's new T-11 parachute comes in for his landing March 16 at Fryar Drop Zone on Fort Benning, Ga. The T-11 is designed for the modern warfighter whose average combat load has increased to more than 400 pounds compared to earlier loads of about 300 pounds. (Photo Credit: Ms. Brenda Donnell (USACR/Safety Center)) VIEW ORIGINAL
Paratroopers float to the ground at Fryar Drop Zone on Fort Benning, Ga., March 16 using the Army's new T-11 parachute. More than 400 students made the jump with the parachute that is replacing the T-10, which has been in the Army's inventory since the 1950s.
5 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Paratroopers float to the ground at Fryar Drop Zone on Fort Benning, Ga., March 16 using the Army's new T-11 parachute. More than 400 students made the jump with the parachute that is replacing the T-10, which has been in the Army's inventory since the 1950s. (Photo Credit: Ms. Brenda Donnell (USACR/Safety Center)) VIEW ORIGINAL
CSM Chippy Mezzaline, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment, prepares to jump with the new T-11 parachute March 16 at Fryar Field on Fort Benning, Ga.
6 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – CSM Chippy Mezzaline, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment, prepares to jump with the new T-11 parachute March 16 at Fryar Field on Fort Benning, Ga. (Photo Credit: Tiffany Nabors, The Bayonet) VIEW ORIGINAL
Airborne student, 2LT Charles Lesperance, left, gives other students the one-minute warning prior to his first jump.  Lesperance was the first student to jump with the T-11.
7 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Airborne student, 2LT Charles Lesperance, left, gives other students the one-minute warning prior to his first jump. Lesperance was the first student to jump with the T-11. (Photo Credit: Tiffany Nabors, The Bayonet) VIEW ORIGINAL
An Airborne student exits with the T-11 parachute.
8 / 8 Show Caption + Hide Caption – An Airborne student exits with the T-11 parachute. (Photo Credit: By Tiffany Nabors, The Bayonet) VIEW ORIGINAL