USASAC facilitates life-saving aid to Gaza

By Tim HansonJanuary 16, 2024

USASAC coordinated with multiple government organizations and partner nations to successfully delivery food, water and humanitarian supplies to Gaza, Dec. 24. A Royal Jordanian aircraft executed the mission using a U.S.-made Joint Precision Airdrop System with GPS-assisted parachute kits to deliver the aid. The U.S. Department of Defense supports a whole-of-government humanitarian response to the Israel conflict and began transporting life-saving supplies to the people in Gaza in November.
USASAC coordinated with multiple government organizations and partner nations to successfully delivery food, water and humanitarian supplies to Gaza, Dec. 24. A Royal Jordanian aircraft executed the mission using a U.S.-made Joint Precision Airdrop System with GPS-assisted parachute kits to deliver the aid. The U.S. Department of Defense supports a whole-of-government humanitarian response to the Israel conflict and began transporting life-saving supplies to the people in Gaza in November. (Photo Credit: Courtesy photo) VIEW ORIGINAL

U.S. Army Security Assistance Command coordinated with multiple stakeholders to provide humanitarian support and supplies to Gaza on the eve of one of the region’s most celebrated holidays, Dec. 24.

“A request came directly from King Abdullah II, the king of Jordan, on Nov. 15 for humanitarian assistance to the Church of Saint Porphyrius in Gaza,” said USASAC Country Program Manager Cecil Jefferson.

Saint Porphyrius is a Greek Orthodox church in Gaza City, State of Palestine. It belongs to the Patriarchate of Jerusalem and is the oldest active church in the city. The church is currently providing refuge to about 800 civilians and medical personnel, said Jefferson.

Due to conditions on the ground and threat to aircraft overhead, delivery of the life-saving supplies was a challenge, said Jefferson. The team opted to use a U.S.-made Joint Precision Airdrop System (JPADS) with GPS-assisted parachute kits which provides rapid, precise, high-altitude delivery capabilities that do not rely on ground transportation.

JPADS is designed for aircraft to drop cargo from altitudes of up to 24,500 feet mean sea level. It releases cargo from a minimum off-set of eight km from the intended point of impact, with an objective capability of 25 km off-set. This off-set allows aircraft to stay out of range of many anti-aircraft systems. JPADS increases aircraft and payload survivability and enables delivery of multiple loads to single or multiple drop zones in a single aircraft pass with accuracy better than 150 meters with 80 percent confidence.

“The mission to deliver the JPADS and the supplies was being monitored by the Defense Security Cooperation Agency and the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Defense Exports and Cooperation. It was also a priority for the U.S. Army Central Command and Special Operations Command among many others,” said Jefferson.

A Royal Jordanian Air Force C-130 plane executed the air drop of food, water, and other humanitarian supplies to the Church of Saint Porphyrius. As the implementing agency, USASAC coordinated with more than 10 government organizations and partner nations.

“It was truly a team effort and whole-of-government humanitarian response,” said Jefferson.