Corps of Engineers works with federal, state agencies to help create new marsh land in Louisiana
1 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – A dredge working for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New Orleans District pumps sediment out of the Calcasieu Ship Channel Dec. 8, 2023, to help create new marsh lands as part of the Louisiana Coastal Restoration and Protection Authority (CPRA) Long Point Bayou Marsh Creation Project, which is located near Hackberry, La. At various stages, this project involved both federal and state agencies, such as USACE, CPRA, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the federal and Louisiana Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) Trustees. The Corps is working on this project as part of their federally-authorized mission to maintain deep draft access of the Calcasieu Ship Channel. The sediment the Corps dredges from the channel is being pumped through a series of pipes into three areas of Long Point Bayou to nourish existing marsh and create nearly 400 acres of saline marsh and tidal creeks. The project is scheduled for completion by early 2024. (U.S. Army photo by Ryan Labadens) (Photo Credit: Ryan Labadens) VIEW ORIGINAL
Corps of Engineers works with federal, state agencies to help create new marsh land in Louisiana
2 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New Orleans District pumps sediment through a series of pipes out of the Calcasieu Ship Channel Dec. 8, 2023, to help create new marsh lands as part of the Louisiana Coastal Restoration and Protection Authority (CPRA) Long Point Bayou Marsh Creation Project, which is located near Hackberry, La. At various stages, this project involved both federal and state agencies, such as USACE, CPRA, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the federal and Louisiana Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) Trustees. The Corps is working on this project as part of their federally-authorized mission to maintain deep draft access of the Calcasieu Ship Channel. The sediment the Corps dredges from the channel is being pumped through a series of pipes into three areas of Long Point Bayou to nourish existing marsh and create nearly 400 acres of saline marsh and tidal creeks. The project is scheduled for completion by early 2024. (U.S. Army photo by Ryan Labadens) (Photo Credit: Ryan Labadens) VIEW ORIGINAL
Corps of Engineers works with federal, state agencies to help create new marsh land in Louisiana
3 / 3 Show Caption + Hide Caption – This is one of three areas in Long Point Bayou the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New Orleans District has been pumping sediment into from the Calcasieu Ship Channel to help create new marsh lands as part of the Louisiana Coastal Restoration and Protection Authority (CPRA) Long Point Bayou Marsh Creation Project, which is located near Hackberry, La. At various stages, this project involved both federal and state agencies, such as USACE, CPRA, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the federal and Louisiana Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) Trustees. The Corps is working on this project as part of their federally-authorized mission to maintain deep draft access of the Calcasieu Ship Channel. The sediment the Corps dredges from the channel is being pumped through a series of pipes into three areas of Long Point Bayou to nourish existing marsh and create nearly 400 acres of saline marsh and tidal creeks. The project is scheduled for completion by early 2024. (U.S. Army photo by Ryan Labadens) (Photo Credit: Ryan Labadens) VIEW ORIGINAL

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New Orleans District has been pumping sediment out of the Calcasieu Ship Channel to help create new marsh lands as part of the Louisiana Coastal Restoration and Protection Authority (CPRA) Long Point Bayou Marsh Creation Project near Hackberry, La.

At various stages, this project involved both federal and state agencies, such as USACE, CPRA, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the federal and Louisiana Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) Trustees.

Since August of 2023, the Corps has been using a dredge to pump sediment from the channel through a series of pipes into three areas of Long Point Bayou to nourish existing marsh and create nearly 400 acres of saline marsh and tidal creeks.

The Corps has been working on this project as part of their federally-authorized mission to maintain deep draft access of the Calcasieu Ship Channel.

The project is scheduled for completion by early 2024.