Lahaina wildfire debris cleanup soon moving into Phase 2
1 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – One of the properties in Kula where debris removal was in process when the group visited. (Photo Credit: Sara Goodeyon) VIEW ORIGINAL
Lahaina wildfire debris cleanup soon moving into Phase 2
2 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – One of the properties the group visited in Kulsa where debris removal is complete. Final erosion control has been applied at this site and a close out package that includes a final inspection checklist, pictures and a USACE closure letter were sent to the county returning the right-of-entry authority. (Photo Credit: Sara Goodeyon) VIEW ORIGINAL
Lahaina wildfire debris cleanup soon moving into Phase 2
3 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Kula resident Thomas Lui lost his home in the Aug. 8 Hawaii Wildfires. At his property site Lui describes to the Lahaina group his experience with the federal debris cleanup and the right-of-entry process. (Photo Credit: Sara Goodeyon) VIEW ORIGINAL
Lahaina wildfire debris cleanup soon moving into Phase 2
4 / 4 Show Caption + Hide Caption – On the visit to Kula the group of local officials from Lahaina saw contractors applying final erosion control at a property in the process of being completed. (Photo Credit: Sara Goodeyon) VIEW ORIGINAL

The Consolidated Debris Removal Program in Lahaina, Maui for the cleanup from the Hawaii Wildfires will soon move in to Phase 2 of the mission which will involve the removal of fire-related debris such as ash, hazardous trees, and concrete foundations.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has been conducting Phase 2 debris removal in Kula since Nov. 7 and as of Dec. 23 has removed debris from 22 residential properties. To prepare Lahaina for Phase 2 operations, USACE invited prominent local officials to visit work sites in Kula to see work in progress and sites that are complete and in turn share this information with the Lahaina community.

The leaders were briefed on how to fill out and turn in right-of-entry forms and other required documentation and what to expect from the Phase 2 cleanup process. The group saw properties where the debris had been removed, soil samples had been collected, final erosion control was complete, and the property had been returned to Maui County.

According to the Pacific Disaster Center, the August 2023 Maui Wildfires Disaster damaged or destroyed more than 2200 Maui properties. The cleanup is requiring a coordinated fire debris removal cleanup that includes Maui County, the EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Cultural monitoring is being conducted at all times during debris operations to help protect the cultural heritage of Hawai‘i and Native Hawaiian people. Native Hawaiian, Maui-based cultural advisors are leading these efforts throughout the process.